Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Music / TheRadiatorsUS

Go To



In the meantime, their following developed in some odd directions. The band's association with the eccentric [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krewe Mardis Gras Krewe]], the Mystic Orphans and Misfits ([=MOMs=]), and their annual performances at the wild, invite-only [=MOMs=] Ball, led to their fans forming their own "krewes" in various cities, such as the Krewe of [=DADs=] in Minnesota, the Monkey Krewe in Florida, and the Krewe de Playa in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, and hosting similar events. Like the [=MOMs=] Ball, these events were often given individual names, such as "Void Where Not Prohibited" (1984 [=MOMs=] Ball) or "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968 Night of the Living [=DADs=]]]" (2007 [=DADs=] Halloween show). The band would often write songs to match the names, making them one of the only bands ever to have {{title track}}s for ''concerts!'' Most of these songs were throwaways, played only once, but a few, like "Fuck'em If They Can't Take a Joke" from the 2003 [=MOMs=] Ball, became part of the band's regular repertoire.

to:

In the meantime, their following developed in some odd directions. The band's association with the eccentric [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krewe Mardis Mardi Gras Krewe]], the Mystic Orphans and Misfits ([=MOMs=]), and their annual performances at the wild, invite-only [=MOMs=] Ball, led to their fans forming their own "krewes" in various cities, such as the Krewe of [=DADs=] in Minnesota, the Monkey Krewe in Florida, and the Krewe de Playa in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, and hosting similar events. Like the [=MOMs=] Ball, these events were often given individual names, such as "Void Where Not Prohibited" (1984 [=MOMs=] Ball) or "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968 Night of the Living [=DADs=]]]" (2007 [=DADs=] Halloween show). The band would often write songs to match the names, making them one of the only bands ever to have {{title track}}s for ''concerts!'' Most of these songs were throwaways, played only once, but a few, like "Fuck'em If They Can't Take a Joke" from the 2003 [=MOMs=] Ball, became part of the band's regular repertoire.


In the meantime, their cult developed in some odd directions. The band's association with the eccentric [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krewe Mardis Gras Krewe]], the Mystic Orphans and Misfits ([=MOMs=]), and their annual performances at the wild, invite-only [=MOMs=] Ball, led to their fans forming their own "krewes" in various cities, such as the Krewe of [=DADs=] in Minnesota, the Monkey Krewe in Florida, and the Krewe de Playa in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, and hosting similar events. Like the [=MOMs=] Ball, these events were often given individual names, such as "Void Where Not Prohibited" (1984 [=MOMs=] Ball) or "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968 Night of the Living [=DADs=]]]" (2007 [=DADs=] Halloween show). The band would often write songs to match the names, making them one of the only bands ever to have {{title track}}s for ''concerts!'' Most of these songs were throwaways, played only once, but a few, like "Fuck'em If They Can't Take a Joke" from the 2003 [=MOMs=] Ball, became part of the band's regular repertoire.

to:

In the meantime, their cult following developed in some odd directions. The band's association with the eccentric [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krewe Mardis Gras Krewe]], the Mystic Orphans and Misfits ([=MOMs=]), and their annual performances at the wild, invite-only [=MOMs=] Ball, led to their fans forming their own "krewes" in various cities, such as the Krewe of [=DADs=] in Minnesota, the Monkey Krewe in Florida, and the Krewe de Playa in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, and hosting similar events. Like the [=MOMs=] Ball, these events were often given individual names, such as "Void Where Not Prohibited" (1984 [=MOMs=] Ball) or "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968 Night of the Living [=DADs=]]]" (2007 [=DADs=] Halloween show). The band would often write songs to match the names, making them one of the only bands ever to have {{title track}}s for ''concerts!'' Most of these songs were throwaways, played only once, but a few, like "Fuck'em If They Can't Take a Joke" from the 2003 [=MOMs=] Ball, became part of the band's regular repertoire.


* TheCasanova: The female version, sometimes called {{Maneater}} appears in "Cannibal Girls".

to:

* TheCasanova: The female version, sometimes called {{Maneater}} [=Maneater=] appears in "Cannibal Girls".


** A siamese ''triplet'' with "Lucinda" into "The Theme from Film/TheMagnificentSeven" into a cover of Music/TheMeters' "Cissy Strut" from ''Live at the Great American Music Hall''.

to:

** A siamese ''triplet'' with "Lucinda" into "The Theme from Film/TheMagnificentSeven" [[Film/TheMagnificentSeven1960 The Magnificent Seven]]" into a cover of Music/TheMeters' "Cissy Strut" from ''Live at the Great American Music Hall''.


In the meantime, their cult developed in some odd directions. The band's association with the eccentric [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krewe Mardis Gras Krewe]], the Mystic Orphans and Misfits ([=MOMs=]), and their annual performances at the wild, invite-only [=MOMs=] Ball, led to their fans forming their own "krewes" in various cities, such as the Krewe of [=DADs=] in Minnesota, the Monkey Krewe in Florida, and the Krewe de Playa in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, and hosting similar events. Like the [=MOMs=] Ball, these events were often given individual names, such as "Void Where Not Prohibited" (1984 [=MOMs=] Ball) or "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead Night of the Living [=DADs=]]]" (2007 [=DADs=] Halloween show). The band would often write songs to match the names, making them one of the only bands ever to have {{title track}}s for ''concerts!'' Most of these songs were throwaways, played only once, but a few, like "Fuck'em If They Can't Take a Joke" from the 2003 [=MOMs=] Ball, became part of the band's regular repertoire.

to:

In the meantime, their cult developed in some odd directions. The band's association with the eccentric [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krewe Mardis Gras Krewe]], the Mystic Orphans and Misfits ([=MOMs=]), and their annual performances at the wild, invite-only [=MOMs=] Ball, led to their fans forming their own "krewes" in various cities, such as the Krewe of [=DADs=] in Minnesota, the Monkey Krewe in Florida, and the Krewe de Playa in UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, and hosting similar events. Like the [=MOMs=] Ball, these events were often given individual names, such as "Void Where Not Prohibited" (1984 [=MOMs=] Ball) or "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead "[[Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968 Night of the Living [=DADs=]]]" (2007 [=DADs=] Halloween show). The band would often write songs to match the names, making them one of the only bands ever to have {{title track}}s for ''concerts!'' Most of these songs were throwaways, played only once, but a few, like "Fuck'em If They Can't Take a Joke" from the 2003 [=MOMs=] Ball, became part of the band's regular repertoire.


->''"Do they do fishead music, bustin' down your ears?"''

to:

->''"Do they do fishead fishhead music, bustin' down your ears?"''


The band started when five working musicians got together for a jam session in singer/keyboardist Ed Volker's garage. The next day, all five quit their current bands and formed The Radiators, which would remain their main gig for the next thirty-three years. Volker, a prolific songwriter, wrote the vast majority of their repertoire, and shared singing duties with guitarist Dave Malone. The band's dual-guitar attack, also featuring guitarist Camille Baudoin, invited frequent comparisons with Music/TheAllmanBrothers, with whom they developed a friendship.[[note]] The Radiators were invited to play at [[https://archive.org/details/rad1997-10-04.flac16 the wedding]] of Allman Brothers guitarist Warren Haynes, and Gregg Allman came to play at The Radiators' 25th anniversary concerts[[/note]]

to:

The band started when five working musicians got together for a jam session in singer/keyboardist Ed Volker's garage. The next day, all five quit their current bands and formed The Radiators, which would remain their main gig for the next thirty-three years. Volker, a prolific songwriter, wrote the vast majority of their repertoire, and shared singing duties with guitarist Dave Malone. The band's dual-guitar attack, also featuring guitarist Camille Baudoin, invited frequent comparisons with Music/TheAllmanBrothers, with whom they later developed a friendship.[[note]] The Radiators were invited to play at [[https://archive.org/details/rad1997-10-04.flac16 the wedding]] of Allman Brothers guitarist Warren Haynes, and Gregg Allman came to play at The Radiators' 25th anniversary concerts[[/note]]


They quickly developed a cult following, and attracted the attention of more established New Orleans musicians like Music/DrJohn, Music/ProfessorLonghair, and particularly with Music/EarlKing, with whom they toured for several years. Within just a few years, they became headliners at the famous New Orleans Jazz Festival (which, as you might guess, was hardly limited to jazz). Soon thereafter, they achieved some mainstream success after signing with Creator/EpicRecords. Their first song to make the charts was "Doctor, Doctor" from ''Law of the Fish'', and their biggest seller was the song "Confidential" from ''Zig-zaggin' Through Ghostland'', which made it all the way up to #8 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock chart.

to:

They quickly developed a cult following, and attracted the attention of more established New Orleans musicians like Music/DrJohn, Music/ProfessorLonghair, and particularly with Music/EarlKing, with whom they toured for several years. Within just a few years, they had enough of a cult following to became regular headliners at the famous New Orleans Jazz Festival (which, as you might guess, was hardly limited to jazz). Soon thereafter, they achieved some mainstream success after signing with Creator/EpicRecords. Their first song to make the charts was "Doctor, Doctor" from ''Law of the Fish'', and their biggest seller was the song "Confidential" from ''Zig-zaggin' Through Ghostland'', which made it all the way up to #8 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock chart.


* SingleStanzaSong: "Law of the Fish". (Usually used in concert as part of a medley.)

to:

* SingleStanzaSong: SingleStanzaSong:
**
"Law of the Fish". (Usually used in concert as part of a medley.)


Added DiffLines:

** The mostly-instrumental "Gummin' Yo' Nub", where the only lyrics are repetitions of the title and the words "No teeth!".


->"Do they do fishead music, bustin' down your ears?"
->-- "Cocktail Music", ''Heat Generation''

to:

->"Do ->''"Do they do fishead music, bustin' down your ears?"
->-- "Cocktail Music",
ears?"''
-->-- '''"Cocktail Music"''',
''Heat Generation''



* ChainsawGood: The song "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" (named for [[Film/TexasChainsawMassacre the movie]])--in the early days, they'd start up an actual chainsaw when performing the song live. (Which got them thrown out of a club or two.)

to:

* ChainsawGood: The song "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" (named for [[Film/TexasChainsawMassacre [[Film/TheTexasChainSawMassacre1974 the movie]])--in the early days, they'd start up an actual chainsaw when performing the song live. (Which got them thrown out of a club or two.)


They quickly developed a cult following, and attracted the attention of more established New Orleans musicians like Music/DrJohn, Music/ProfessorLonghair, and particularly with Music/EarlKing, with whom they toured for several years. Within just a few years, they became headliners at the famous New Orleans Jazz Festival (which, as you might guess, was hardly limited to jazz).

to:

They quickly developed a cult following, and attracted the attention of more established New Orleans musicians like Music/DrJohn, Music/ProfessorLonghair, and particularly with Music/EarlKing, with whom they toured for several years. Within just a few years, they became headliners at the famous New Orleans Jazz Festival (which, as you might guess, was hardly limited to jazz).
jazz). Soon thereafter, they achieved some mainstream success after signing with Creator/EpicRecords. Their first song to make the charts was "Doctor, Doctor" from ''Law of the Fish'', and their biggest seller was the song "Confidential" from ''Zig-zaggin' Through Ghostland'', which made it all the way up to #8 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock chart.


The Radiators (occasionally The New Orleans Radiators) are a {{long runn|er}}ing rock band from [[TheBigEasy New Orleans]], purveyors of a spicy gumbo they call "Fishhead Music"--a blend of swamp rock and New Orleans-style funk, with a dash of soul and a sprinkling of Creole and Cajun influences.

to:

The Radiators (occasionally The New Orleans Radiators) are a {{long runn|er}}ing rock band from [[TheBigEasy New Orleans]], purveyors of a spicy gumbo they call "Fishhead Music"--a blend of swamp rock and New Orleans-style funk, R&B, with a dash of soul funk, a splash of soul, and a sprinkling of Creole and Cajun influences.


** "Sunglasses On" is full of references to the biblical character Moses.

to:

** "Sunglasses On" is full of references to the biblical character Moses.[[Literature/BookOfExodus Moses]].


* FlyingSaucer: * The cover of ''Earth vs. The Radiators'' (as well as the associated concert film) has a flying saucer approaching Earth...sporting a bumper sticker for the band.

to:

* FlyingSaucer: * The cover of ''Earth vs. The Radiators'' (as well as the associated concert film) has a flying saucer approaching Earth...sporting a bumper sticker for the band.

Added DiffLines:

* FlyingSaucer: * The cover of ''Earth vs. The Radiators'' (as well as the associated concert film) has a flying saucer approaching Earth...sporting a bumper sticker for the band.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 21

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report