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* AdaptationalContextChange: In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what? It implies the revolutionaries ''care'' about the king being well fed.

to:

* AdaptationalContextChange: In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what? It plate", which implies the revolutionaries ''care'' about the king being well fed.



* DarkerAndEdgier:
** Once upon a time, Kidz Bop would not lay their hands on any PG-13 rated song. Nowadays, having a huge pop hit and being passed over by Kidz Bop is seen as the music industry's equivalent of dodging a bullet. Proof of Kidz Bop's increasingly liberal approach to song selection can be seen in its track record of covering ''Hot 100'' number-one singles. For example, out of 18 #1 singles in 2000, only seven ("Smooth", "What A Girl Wants", "Amazed", "Try Again", "Be with You", "Everything You Want", and "Come On Over Baby") appeared on a Kidz Bop album. Flash-forward to 2015, and "Cheerleader" is the ''thirteenth'' consecutive Hot 100 #1 single to have made it onto a Kidz Bop album.[[note]]Let's count: "Timber", "Dark Horse", "Happy" and "All of Me" on ''26'', "Fancy", "Rude", "Shake It Off", and "All About That Bass" on ''27'', "Blank Space" and "Uptown Funk" on ''28'', "See You Again" on ''29'', and "Bad Blood" and "Cheerleader" on ''30''. The streak was finally broken when neither "Can't Feel My Face" nor "The Hills", The Weeknd's #1 hits, appeared on any Kidz Bop album.[[/note]] This is inverted with "Locked Away", which is inexplicably absent from the series despite being a perfectly clean and massive hit.
** Kidz Bop was once known for being mostly rap-free, rarely including covers of rap songs unless they had a poppy chorus or the rap parts were removed (e.g. "Live Your Life"). This is understandable, since pop is their main genre and most rap music nowadays is too explicit to be considered "kid-friendly". Fast-forward to the mid-2010s, and Kidz Bop is not only starting to include rap verses in their pop covers, but has also started covering rap songs altogether a lot more frequently, even getting away with the more R-rated ones (e.g. "Don't Mind") by rappers with highly child-unfriendly images (e.g. Music/PostMalone, Music/{{Drake}}, Music/CardiB).

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier:
** Once upon a time, Kidz Bop would not lay their hands on any PG-13 rated song. Nowadays, having a huge pop hit and being passed over by Kidz Bop is seen as the music industry's equivalent of dodging a bullet. Proof of Kidz Bop's increasingly liberal approach to song selection can be seen in its track record of covering ''Hot 100'' number-one singles. For example, out of 18 #1 singles in 2000, only seven ("Smooth", "What A Girl Wants", "Amazed", "Try Again", "Be with You", "Everything You Want", and "Come On Over Baby") appeared on a Kidz Bop album. Flash-forward to 2015, and "Cheerleader" is the ''thirteenth'' consecutive Hot 100 #1 single to have made it onto a Kidz Bop album.[[note]]Let's count: "Timber", "Dark Horse", "Happy" and "All of Me" on ''26'', "Fancy", "Rude", "Shake It Off", and "All About That Bass" on ''27'', "Blank Space" and "Uptown Funk" on ''28'', "See You Again" on ''29'', and "Bad Blood" and "Cheerleader" on ''30''. The streak was finally broken when neither "Can't Feel My Face" nor "The Hills", The Weeknd's #1 hits, appeared on any Kidz Bop album.[[/note]] This is inverted with "Locked Away", which is inexplicably absent from the series despite being a perfectly clean and massive hit.
**
DarkerAndEdgier: Kidz Bop was once known for being mostly rap-free, rarely including covers of rap songs unless they had a poppy chorus or the rap parts were removed (e.g. "Live Your Life"). This is understandable, justified, since pop is their main genre and most rap music nowadays is too explicit to be considered "kid-friendly". Fast-forward to the mid-2010s, and Kidz Bop is not only starting to include rap verses in their pop covers, but has also started covering rap songs altogether a lot more frequently, even getting away with the more R-rated ones (e.g. "Don't Mind") by rappers with highly child-unfriendly images (e.g. Music/PostMalone, Music/{{Drake}}, Music/CardiB).



%% * GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming and persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the future, please check the trope page to make sure your example fits the current definition.



* LyricalDissonance: As the entry for AgeInappropriateArt points out, there are plenty of songs with dark themes that were already LyricalDissonance...and their version winds up even cheerier-sounding.
* NeverSayDie: The word is usually altered on most occasions.

to:

* LyricalDissonance: As the entry for AgeInappropriateArt points out, there are plenty of songs with dark themes that were already LyricalDissonance...LyricalDissonance, and their version winds up even cheerier-sounding.
* NeverSayDie: The word is usually altered on most occasions.



** There are occasionally bizarre aversions, such as Music/{{Buckcherry}}'s "Sorry", [[Music/CeeLoGreen Gnarls]] [[Music/BrianBurton Barkely]]'s "Crazy", Music/ZaraLarsson & MNEK's "Never Forget You", Franz Ferdinand's "Take Me Out", Music/DestinysChild's "Survivor", and Music/{{Evanescence}}'s "Bring Me To Life".
* OhMyGods: Inverted; references to the Lord's name in vain are usually modified, although bizarrely left intact on some occasions, like in their cover of Music/FloridaGeorgiaLine's "Cruise (remix)".


** There are occasionally bizarre aversions, such as Music/{{Buckcherry}}'s "Sorry", [[Music/CeeLoGreen Gnarls]] [[Music/BrianBurton Barkely]]'s "Crazy", Music/ZaraLarsson & MNEK's "Never Forget You", Frank Ferdinand's "Take Me Out", Music/DestinysChild's "Survivor", and Music/{{Evanescence}}'s "Bring Me To Life".

to:

** There are occasionally bizarre aversions, such as Music/{{Buckcherry}}'s "Sorry", [[Music/CeeLoGreen Gnarls]] [[Music/BrianBurton Barkely]]'s "Crazy", Music/ZaraLarsson & MNEK's "Never Forget You", Frank Franz Ferdinand's "Take Me Out", Music/DestinysChild's "Survivor", and Music/{{Evanescence}}'s "Bring Me To Life".


* AdaptationalContextChange:
** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what? It implies the revolutionaries ''care'' about the king being well fed.
** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/TheChainsmokers' "Closer", the line "Pull the sheets right off the corner / Of that mattress that you stole" is changed to "Pull the sheets right off the corner / Of the notebook that you stole". Why are they pulling sheets out of a notebook?

to:

* AdaptationalContextChange:
**
AdaptationalContextChange: In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what? It implies the revolutionaries ''care'' about the king being well fed.
** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/TheChainsmokers' "Closer", the line "Pull the sheets right off the corner / Of that mattress that you stole" is changed to "Pull the sheets right off the corner / Of the notebook that you stole". Why are they pulling sheets out of a notebook?
fed.


** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what? It almost implies the revolutionaries care about the king being well fed.

to:

** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what? It almost implies the revolutionaries care ''care'' about the king being well fed.


** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what?

to:

** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what?what? It almost implies the revolutionaries care about the king being well fed.


* AdaptationalContextChange: In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what?

to:

* AdaptationalContextChange: AdaptationalContextChange:
**
In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what?what?
** In Kidz Bop's version of Music/TheChainsmokers' "Closer", the line "Pull the sheets right off the corner / Of that mattress that you stole" is changed to "Pull the sheets right off the corner / Of the notebook that you stole". Why are they pulling sheets out of a notebook?

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalContextChange: In Kidz Bop's version of Music/{{Coldplay}}'s "Viva la Vida", a song told from the perspective of a fallen king, the line "Revolutionaries wait / For my head on a silver plate" is changed to "Revolutionaries wait / For my food on a silver plate" which... what?

Added DiffLines:

* YoungerAndHipper: It's not uncommon for songs to be rewritten with younger protagonists who mention things such as school.

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalNameChange: Mentions of the original artists in songs are changed to mention Kidz Bop, going as far as to rename the "Cupid Shuffle" to "Kidz Bop Shuffle".


* PuppyLove: Despite young children being deemed too young to go on legitimate dates, they still cover songs about romance.

to:

* PuppyLove: Despite young children being deemed too young to go on legitimate dates, they still cover songs about romance.


* LongRunner: They've released 40 [=CDs=] since first starting in 2001.

to:

* LongRunner: They've released 40 41 [=CDs=] since first starting in 2001.



* ParentalBonus: If the original song contains a ShoutOut, Kidz Bop usually leaves it alone if it's clean enough, even if it's referencing something their target audience likely has never heard of. (e.g. Mr. Mister in Music/{{Train}}'s "Hey, Soul Sister")

to:

* ParentalBonus: If the original song contains a ShoutOut, Kidz Bop usually leaves it alone if it's clean enough, even if it's referencing something their target audience likely has never heard of. of (e.g. Mr. Mister in Music/{{Train}}'s "Hey, Soul Sister")Sister").
* PuppyLove: Despite young children being deemed too young to go on legitimate dates, they still cover songs about romance.

Added DiffLines:

* ParentalBonus: If the original song contains a ShoutOut, Kidz Bop usually leaves it alone if it's clean enough, even if it's referencing something their target audience likely has never heard of. (e.g. Mr. Mister in Music/{{Train}}'s "Hey, Soul Sister")


** The rules are inconsistent. In "Jealous" from ''28'', "protective or possessive" was changed to "possessive or obsessive", but "call me obsessed" was changed to "call me a mess". On ''24'', "Can't Hold Us" changes "fight 'till it's over" to "dance 'till it's over", even though the reference is metaphorical, but on ''25'', "Brave"'s reference to a weapon which was ''not'' metaphorical was kept in, along with "Bad Blood" and "Fight Song"'s titles and some of the references, like "Did you have to hurt me?" and "The wrecking balls inside my brain", both from ''30''. All of the GettingCrapPastTheRadar examples count as well.

to:

** The rules are inconsistent. In "Jealous" from ''28'', "protective or possessive" was changed to "possessive or obsessive", but "call me obsessed" was changed to "call me a mess". On ''24'', "Can't Hold Us" changes "fight 'till it's over" to "dance 'till it's over", even though the reference is metaphorical, but on ''25'', "Brave"'s reference to a weapon which was ''not'' metaphorical was kept in, along with "Bad Blood" and "Fight Song"'s titles and some of the references, like "Did you have to hurt me?" and "The wrecking balls inside my brain", both from ''30''. All of the GettingCrapPastTheRadar examples count as well.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Despite being aimed towards children, some inappropriate lyrics remain unaltered here and there. While it's possibly on accident or due to Kidz Bop's misinterpretation of the lyrics, what slips by is quite surprising to say the least.
** In 2009, when UsefulNotes/McDonalds put Kidz Bop [=CDs=] in their Happy Meals, one of the [=CDs=] featured a cover of Gavin Degraw's "I Don't Want to Be", with the line "I'm tired of lookin' round rooms" misheard as "I'm tired of [[PrecisionFStrike fuckin']] round rooms". [[http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/business/Parents-Not-Happy-With-Spicy-Happy-Meal.html This resulted in controversy and complaints surrounding McDonald's.]]
** The Kidz Bop edit of Justin Timberlake's "Suit and Tie" is still very suggestive - the chorus includes the promise of "leaving it all on the floor tonight" among other references.
** Their cover of Music/BarenakedLadies' "One Week" leaves the line "Gotta get in tune with ''Manga/SailorMoon'', cause that cartoon has got the boom anime babes [[SomethingElseAlsoRises that make me think the wrong thing]]" intact.
** Their cover of Elle King's "Ex's and Oh's" doesn't change the line "Like ghosts they want me to make them O", which is a reference to an orgasm.
** They literally get "crap" past the radar in their cover of Music/{{Train}}'s "50 Ways to Say Goodbye" by leaving the "crappy purple Scion" line intact.
** In their cover of Flo Rida's "Wild Ones", every alcoholic beverage reference is removed, but a bizarre aversion is the word "vodka" in the line "Gotta move over like too much vodka".[[note]]The original lyric is "Got a hangover like too much vodka", and given that the term "hangover" wouldn't be appropriate in a Kidz Bop cover, it makes sense for the word to be changed, and being asked to "move over" after excessive vodka consumption also makes sense in context, but the mystery that remains is why the reference to vodka is left intact whereas every other drinking reference is modified[[/note]].
** In their cover of Mark Ronson's "Uptown Funk!", the term "white gold", which is a street term for cocaine, remains intact.
** "Me, Myself & I" has the line "We don't take L's, we just make M's" kept in, despite the L being a term for a line (of cocaine).
** "This Love" has its sexual and drug-based lyrics kept fully intact, complete with the adult singer placing an inappropriate clear emphasis on the line "keep her ''coming'' every night."
** Their cover of "RITMO" has the word "puta" intact. Considering the word is well-known as a Spanish vulgarity even to non-Spanish speakers, how this managed to slip by the very tight Kidz Bop radar is unknown.
** Their version of [[Music/LilNasX "Old Town Road"]] changes "Lean all in my bladder" to "Ridin' on my bladder" "Bull ridin' and boobies" to "Bull ridin' and bougie" and "Wrangler on my booty" to "Wrangler like on TV" but surprisingly and bizarrely leaves "Cheated on my baby/You can go and ask her" intact.

to:

%% * GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Despite being aimed towards children, some inappropriate lyrics remain unaltered here GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming and there. While it's possibly on accident or due to Kidz Bop's misinterpretation of persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the lyrics, what slips by is quite surprising to say future, please check the least.
** In 2009, when UsefulNotes/McDonalds put Kidz Bop [=CDs=] in their Happy Meals, one of the [=CDs=] featured a cover of Gavin Degraw's "I Don't Want to Be", with the line "I'm tired of lookin' round rooms" misheard as "I'm tired of [[PrecisionFStrike fuckin']] round rooms". [[http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/business/Parents-Not-Happy-With-Spicy-Happy-Meal.html This resulted in controversy and complaints surrounding McDonald's.]]
** The Kidz Bop edit of Justin Timberlake's "Suit and Tie" is still very suggestive - the chorus includes the promise of "leaving it all on the floor tonight" among other references.
** Their cover of Music/BarenakedLadies' "One Week" leaves the line "Gotta get in tune with ''Manga/SailorMoon'', cause that cartoon has got the boom anime babes [[SomethingElseAlsoRises that make me think the wrong thing]]" intact.
** Their cover of Elle King's "Ex's and Oh's" doesn't change the line "Like ghosts they want me
trope page to make them O", which is a reference to an orgasm.
** They literally get "crap" past
sure your example fits the radar in their cover of Music/{{Train}}'s "50 Ways to Say Goodbye" by leaving the "crappy purple Scion" line intact.
** In their cover of Flo Rida's "Wild Ones", every alcoholic beverage reference is removed, but a bizarre aversion is the word "vodka" in the line "Gotta move over like too much vodka".[[note]]The original lyric is "Got a hangover like too much vodka", and given that the term "hangover" wouldn't be appropriate in a Kidz Bop cover, it makes sense for the word to be changed, and being asked to "move over" after excessive vodka consumption also makes sense in context, but the mystery that remains is why the reference to vodka is left intact whereas every other drinking reference is modified[[/note]].
** In their cover of Mark Ronson's "Uptown Funk!", the term "white gold", which is a street term for cocaine, remains intact.
** "Me, Myself & I" has the line "We don't take L's, we just make M's" kept in, despite the L being a term for a line (of cocaine).
** "This Love" has its sexual and drug-based lyrics kept fully intact, complete with the adult singer placing an inappropriate clear emphasis on the line "keep her ''coming'' every night."
** Their cover of "RITMO" has the word "puta" intact. Considering the word is well-known as a Spanish vulgarity even to non-Spanish speakers, how this managed to slip by the very tight Kidz Bop radar is unknown.
** Their version of [[Music/LilNasX "Old Town Road"]] changes "Lean all in my bladder" to "Ridin' on my bladder" "Bull ridin' and boobies" to "Bull ridin' and bougie" and "Wrangler on my booty" to "Wrangler like on TV" but surprisingly and bizarrely leaves "Cheated on my baby/You can go and ask her" intact.
current definition.


''Kidz Bop'' is a CD series of pop song covers performed by kids. Currently on the [[LongRunner 40th CD]] of their main series, Kidz Bop has also released several special collection [=CDs=]. Kidz Bop releases albums every six months; it changed to a quarterly release schedule in 2015, shifted to a triannual release schedule, returned to its traditional semiannual release by 2018, and moved to once-a-year releases in 2019.

to:

''Kidz Bop'' is a CD series of pop song covers performed by kids. Currently on the [[LongRunner 40th 41st CD]] of their main series, Kidz Bop has also released several special collection [=CDs=]. Kidz Bop releases albums every six months; it changed to a quarterly release schedule in 2015, shifted to a triannual tri-annual release schedule, returned to its traditional semiannual release by 2018, and moved to once-a-year releases in 2019.



* {{Bowdlerize}}: Kidz Bop does this to songs that originally have profanity or anything relating to substance abuse, alcohol, violence or sex in their lyrics in order to make them more kid-friendly. [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids This makes their song choices interesting, to say the least.]] Even lyrics of more innocent forms of love are edited in more than a few situations.

to:

* {{Bowdlerize}}: Kidz Bop does this to songs that originally have profanity or anything relating to substance abuse, alcohol, violence or sex in their lyrics in order to make them more kid-friendly. [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids This makes their song choices interesting, to say the least.]] Even lyrics of more innocent forms of love are edited in more than a few situations.



* ChildPopstar: The best-known example in 21st century America.

to:

* ChildPopstar: The best-known example in 21st century America.They're a group of kids singing kid-friendly versions of today's pop hits.



** DNCE's "Cake by the Ocean", in the original version, uses cake as a metaphor for sex on the beach, whereas the Kidz Bop version is about eating literal cake.

to:

** DNCE's "Cake by the Ocean", in the original version, uses cake as a metaphor for sex on the beach, beach and cunnilingus, whereas the Kidz Bop version is about eating literal cake.



** Once upon a time, Kidz Bop would not lay their hands on any PG-13 rated song. Nowadays, having a huge pop hit and being passed over by Kidz Bop is seen as the music industry's equivalent of dodging a bullet. Proof of Kidz Bop's increasingly liberal approach to song selection can be seen in its track record of covering ''Hot 100'' number-one singles. For example, out of 18 #1 singles in 2000, only seven ("Smooth", "What A Girl Wants", "Amazed", "Try Again", "Be with You", "Everything You Want", and "Come On Over Baby") appeared on a Kidz Bop album. Flash-forward to 2015, and "Cheerleader" is the ''thirteenth'' consecutive Hot 100 #1 single to have made it onto a Kidz Bop album.[[note]]Let's count: "Timber", "Dark Horse", "Happy" and "All of Me" on ''26'', "Fancy", "Rude", "Shake It Off", and "All About That Bass" on ''27'', "Blank Space" and "Uptown Funk" on ''28'', "See You Again" on ''29'', and "Bad Blood" and "Cheerleader" on ''30''. The streak was finally broken when neither "Can't Feel My Face" nor "The Hills", The Weeknd's #1 hits, appeared on any Kidz Bop album. However, the remaining #1 hits of the year, "What Do You Mean?", "Hello", and "Sorry", the first #1 of 2016, made it onto ''31'' with hardly any issues. "Work" (surprisingly enough), "Love Yourself", and "One Dance" (but not "Pillowtalk" or "Panda") made it onto ''32''. "Can't Stop the Feeling!" and "Cheap Thrills" made it onto ''33''. "Closer" made ''34'', but "Black Beatles" and "Starboy" didn't. "That's What I Like" made ''35'', but "Bad and Boujee", "Humble", and (most surprisingly) "Shape of You" didn't; "I'm the One" made ''36'', while "Despacito" missed the boat. "Look What You Made Me Do", "Havana" and "Perfect" made it on ''37'', but "Bodak Yellow" and "Rockstar" didn't. "God's Plan" made it on ''38'', but not "Nice for What” or "Psycho". "I Like It", "Girls Like You" and "In My Feelings" made it on ''39'' but "This is America" and "Sad!" were obviously snubbed. "Thank U, Next", "7 Rings", "Without Me", "Old Town Road", "Shallow", "Sucker", and "Sunflower" have all been released as singles, but the ship has likely sailed for "Sicko Mode". Time will tell if "Circles", "The Box", "Someone You Loved", "Highest in the Room", and "Lose You to Love Me" will get on ''41''.[[/note]] This is inverted with "Locked Away", which is inexplicably absent from the series despite being a perfectly clean and massive hit.

to:

** Once upon a time, Kidz Bop would not lay their hands on any PG-13 rated song. Nowadays, having a huge pop hit and being passed over by Kidz Bop is seen as the music industry's equivalent of dodging a bullet. Proof of Kidz Bop's increasingly liberal approach to song selection can be seen in its track record of covering ''Hot 100'' number-one singles. For example, out of 18 #1 singles in 2000, only seven ("Smooth", "What A Girl Wants", "Amazed", "Try Again", "Be with You", "Everything You Want", and "Come On Over Baby") appeared on a Kidz Bop album. Flash-forward to 2015, and "Cheerleader" is the ''thirteenth'' consecutive Hot 100 #1 single to have made it onto a Kidz Bop album.[[note]]Let's count: "Timber", "Dark Horse", "Happy" and "All of Me" on ''26'', "Fancy", "Rude", "Shake It Off", and "All About That Bass" on ''27'', "Blank Space" and "Uptown Funk" on ''28'', "See You Again" on ''29'', and "Bad Blood" and "Cheerleader" on ''30''. The streak was finally broken when neither "Can't Feel My Face" nor "The Hills", The Weeknd's #1 hits, appeared on any Kidz Bop album. However, the remaining #1 hits of the year, "What Do You Mean?", "Hello", and "Sorry", the first #1 of 2016, made it onto ''31'' with hardly any issues. "Work" (surprisingly enough), "Love Yourself", and "One Dance" (but not "Pillowtalk" or "Panda") made it onto ''32''. "Can't Stop the Feeling!" and "Cheap Thrills" made it onto ''33''. "Closer" made ''34'', but "Black Beatles" and "Starboy" didn't. "That's What I Like" made ''35'', but "Bad and Boujee", "Humble", and (most surprisingly) "Shape of You" didn't; "I'm the One" made ''36'', while "Despacito" missed the boat. "Look What You Made Me Do", "Havana" and "Perfect" made it on ''37'', but "Bodak Yellow" and "Rockstar" didn't. "God's Plan" made it on ''38'', but not "Nice for What” or "Psycho". "I Like It", "Girls Like You" and "In My Feelings" made it on ''39'' but "This is America" and "Sad!" were obviously snubbed. "Thank U, Next", "7 Rings", "Without Me", "Old Town Road", "Shallow", "Sucker", and "Sunflower" have all been released as singles, but the ship has likely sailed for "Sicko Mode". Time will tell if "Circles", "The Box", "Someone You Loved", "Highest in the Room", and "Lose You to Love Me" will get on ''41''.[[/note]] This is inverted with "Locked Away", which is inexplicably absent from the series despite being a perfectly clean and massive hit.


** "Born This Way" went from being an LGBT rights anthem to being about differing opinions

to:

** "Born This Way" went from being an LGBT rights anthem to being about differing opinionsopinions.



** Their cover of Music/BarenakedLadies' "One Week" leaves intact with the line "Gotta get in tune with ''Manga/SailorMoon'', cause that cartoon has got the boom anime babes [[SomethingElseAlsoRises that make me think the wrong thing]]."

to:

** Their cover of Music/BarenakedLadies' "One Week" leaves intact with the line "Gotta get in tune with ''Manga/SailorMoon'', cause that cartoon has got the boom anime babes [[SomethingElseAlsoRises that make me think the wrong thing]]."thing]]" intact.


Added DiffLines:

** Their version of [[Music/LilNasX "Old Town Road"]] changes "Lean all in my bladder" to "Ridin' on my bladder" "Bull ridin' and boobies" to "Bull ridin' and bougie" and "Wrangler on my booty" to "Wrangler like on TV" but surprisingly and bizarrely leaves "Cheated on my baby/You can go and ask her" intact.

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