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''[='hours...'=]'' is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies"). Given the comparatively slow state of the dial-up form of internet that was common in the 1990's, Bowie launched his own ISP, [=BowieNet=], the year prior to this album's release partly as a means of giving fans a way to more readily download the album in its entirety.

to:

''[='hours...'=]'' is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI Creator/{{EMI}} sublabel Virgin Records Creator/VirginRecords and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies"). Given the comparatively slow state of the dial-up form of internet that was common in the 1990's, Bowie launched his own ISP, [=BowieNet=], the year prior to this album's release partly as a means of giving fans a way to more readily download the album in its entirety.



** Some versions of the album totally omit the text, stripes, and mock barcodes from the front cover, leaving just the main image against a white background.

to:

** Some versions of the album totally omit the text, stripes, and mock barcodes from the front cover, leaving just the main image against a white background.background.
----


Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart and being certified silver in the UK and gold in France) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). In the US, it would also gain the dubious distinction of being Bowie's first album since ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' to miss the Billboard Top 40, peaking at No. 47. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, ''[='hours...'=]'' would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016, largely due to it repeating the adult contemporary style that had previously embodied the equally divisive ''Music/BlackTieWhiteNoise'' six years prior. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.

to:

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking successful, peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart and being certified silver in the UK and gold in France) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). France. In the US, it would also gain the dubious distinction of being was Bowie's first album since ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' to miss the Billboard Top 40, peaking at No. 47. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, ''[='hours...'=]'' would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016, largely due to it repeating the adult contemporary style that had previously embodied the equally divisive ''Music/BlackTieWhiteNoise'' six years prior. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.
47.

Added DiffLines:

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart and being certified silver in the UK and gold in France) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). In the US, it would also gain the dubious distinction of being Bowie's first album since ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' to miss the Billboard Top 40, peaking at No. 47. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, ''[='hours...'=]'' would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016, largely due to it repeating the adult contemporary style that had previously embodied the equally divisive ''Music/BlackTieWhiteNoise'' six years prior. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.


Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart and being certified silver in the UK and gold in France) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). In the US, it would also gain the dubious distinction of being Bowie's first album since ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' to miss the Billboard Top 40, peaking at No. 47. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, ''[='hours...'=]'' would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016, largely due to it repeating the adult contemporary style that had previously embodied the equally divisive ''Music/BlackTieWhiteNoise'' six years prior. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.


[[caption-width-right:350:''"All of my life I've tried so hard..."'']]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:''"All of my life I've tried so hard...[[caption-width-right:350:''"Lived all our best times, left with the worst."'']]


A [[NewSoundAlbum major departure]] from the [[Music/{{Outside}} preceding]] [[Music/{{Earthling}} two]] albums, being a mix of art rock and pop rock with heavy electronic leanings and a much more LighterAndSofter style both musically and lyrically (save for the hard rock-influenced "What's Really Happening" and "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell"), every song on this album was both used in and originally recorded for the video game ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'', essentially making this Bowie's sole foray into VGM. In addition, the song "What's Really Happening?" was also recorded live using lyrics that were submitted as part of a "Cyber Song" fan competition on Bowie's official website, later advertised on the tray art for the album's CD release.

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). Unlike ''Earthling'', however, it would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.

to:

A [[NewSoundAlbum major departure]] from the [[Music/{{Outside}} preceding]] [[Music/{{Earthling}} two]] albums, being a mix of art rock and pop rock with heavy electronic leanings and a much more LighterAndSofter style both musically and lyrically (save for the hard rock-influenced HardRock-influenced "What's Really Happening" and "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell"), every song on this album was both used in and originally recorded for the video game ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'', essentially making this Bowie's sole foray into VGM. In addition, the song "What's Really Happening?" was also recorded live using lyrics that were submitted as part of a "Cyber Song" fan competition on Bowie's official website, later advertised on the tray art for the album's CD release.

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart) chart and being certified silver in the UK and gold in France) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). In the US, it would also gain the dubious distinction of being Bowie's first album since ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' to miss the Billboard Top 40, peaking at No. 47. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, it ''[='hours...'=]'' would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016.2016, largely due to it repeating the adult contemporary style that had previously embodied the equally divisive ''Music/BlackTieWhiteNoise'' six years prior. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.



!! ''Don't hold your breath but the pretty tropes are going to hell''

to:

!! ''Don't hold your breath ''You're still troping, but the pretty tropes are going to hell''
you don't know why''


[[AC:Japanese-exclusive bonus track]]
# "We All Go Through" (4:10)



!! Bonus Track (Japan):

# "We All Go Through"

----


''[='hours...'=]'' is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies").

to:

''[='hours...'=]'' is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies").
Lies"). Given the comparatively slow state of the dial-up form of internet that was common in the 1990's, Bowie launched his own ISP, [=BowieNet=], the year prior to this album's release partly as a means of giving fans a way to more readily download the album in its entirety.


* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one (six if you count ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).

to:

* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one (six if (depending on whether or not you count ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).SelfTitledAlbum, and ''Tin Machine II'', which depends on whether or not you treat Tin Machine as a true Bowie project or an independent entity, the number goes up to either six or seven).


** For reasons unknown, the spinal portion of the tray art featured different backgrounds between the initial UK/European and US CD releases. The UK/European version featured a series of orange stripes similar to the ones throughout the rest of the album art, with the "davidbowie.com" text in white and in the same font as his logotype on the front cover The US version, meanwhile, features a white background for the spinal portion of the tray art, with the "davidbowie.com" text being in a mock barcode. Some releases across regions completely omit this portion altogether, leaving a solid white background on the upper spine.

to:

** For reasons unknown, the spinal portion of the tray art featured different backgrounds between the initial UK/European and US CD releases. The UK/European version featured a series of orange stripes similar to the ones throughout the rest of the album art, with the "davidbowie.com" text in white and in the same font as his logotype on the front cover cover. The US version, meanwhile, features a white background for the spinal portion of the tray art, with the "davidbowie.com" text being in a mock barcode. Some releases across regions completely omit this portion altogether, leaving a solid white background on the upper spine. As of Creator/ParlophoneRecords' 2016 repressing of the album, the UK/Europe variant of the spine art is considered the standard one.


''Hours'' (stylised as ''[='hours...'=]'') is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies").

A [[NewSoundAlbum major departure]] from the [[Music/{{Outside}} preceding]] [[Music/{{Earthling}} two]] albums, being a mix of art rock and pop rock with much more LighterAndSofter style both musically and lyrically (save for the hard rock-influenced "What's Really Happening" and "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell"), every song on this album was both used in and originally recorded for the video game ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'', essentially making this Bowie's sole foray into VGM. In addition, the song "What's Really Happening?" was also recorded live using lyrics that were submitted as part of a "Cyber Song" fan competition on Bowie's official website, later advertised on the tray art for the album's CD release.

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}}. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, it would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.

to:

''Hours'' (stylised as ''[='hours...'=]'') '=]'' is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies").

A [[NewSoundAlbum major departure]] from the [[Music/{{Outside}} preceding]] [[Music/{{Earthling}} two]] albums, being a mix of art rock and pop rock with heavy electronic leanings and a much more LighterAndSofter style both musically and lyrically (save for the hard rock-influenced "What's Really Happening" and "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell"), every song on this album was both used in and originally recorded for the video game ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'', essentially making this Bowie's sole foray into VGM. In addition, the song "What's Really Happening?" was also recorded live using lyrics that were submitted as part of a "Cyber Song" fan competition on Bowie's official website, later advertised on the tray art for the album's CD release.

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}}.Music/{{Sting}} (not helped by the fact that Sting himself had released his own electronic-tinged pop rock album ''Brand New Day'' the month prior). Unlike ''Earthling'', however, it would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.


* VariantCovers:

to:

* VariantCovers:VariantCover:


''Hours'' (stylised as ''[='hours...'=]'') is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks.

A [[NewSoundAlbum major departure]] from the [[Music/{{Outside}} preceding]] [[Music/{{Earthling}} two]] albums, a lot of the material was used in the video game ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul''. In addition, the song "What's Really Happening?" was also recorded live using lyrics that were submitted as part of a fan competition.

to:

''Hours'' (stylised as ''[='hours...'=]'') is the twenty-second studio album by Music/DavidBowie, released in 1999. It is notable for being not only his last album with both the EMI sublabel Virgin Records and EMI as a whole (with all following albums being released through Creator/ColumbiaRecords), but also the first complete album by a major artist available to download over the Internet, preceding its physical release by two weeks.

weeks (it wasn't the first music of any kind distributed in this manner, though; that would be Bowie's earlier single "Telling Lies").

A [[NewSoundAlbum major departure]] from the [[Music/{{Outside}} preceding]] [[Music/{{Earthling}} two]] albums, being a lot mix of art rock and pop rock with much more LighterAndSofter style both musically and lyrically (save for the material hard rock-influenced "What's Really Happening" and "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell"), every song on this album was both used in and originally recorded for the video game ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul''. ''VideoGame/OmikronTheNomadSoul'', essentially making this Bowie's sole foray into VGM. In addition, the song "What's Really Happening?" was also recorded live using lyrics that were submitted as part of a "Cyber Song" fan competition.
competition on Bowie's official website, later advertised on the tray art for the album's CD release.

Like its predecessor ''Earthling'', ''[='hours...'=]'' was commercially successful (peaking at No. 5 on the UK albums chart) but divisive among fans and critics, with many negatively comparing it to Music/{{Sting}}. Unlike ''Earthling'', however, it would maintain its divisiveness even after Bowie's death in 2016. The album was also a point of contention between Bowie and co-producer and former Tin Machine member Reeves Gabrels, who intended for a rawer, ''Music/DiamondDogs''-esque sound on the album. The CreativeDifferences between Bowie and Gabrels resulted in them breaking professional ties with one another, though on a personal level the two didn't seem to hold much animosity after the fact.



* OtherCommonMusicVideoConcepts - Band from Mundania:
** Both the official ''[='hours...'=]'' videos put Bowie in domestic settings and then ease in fantasy elements. In "Thursday's Child", he and his current lover are getting ready for bed when in the bathroom mirror he sees a reflection of his younger self and an old lover. In "Survive", he broods alone in a cluttered kitchen over a romantic breakup and then gravity goes askew. The unreleased video for "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell" would kept the trend as well (see WhatCouldHaveBeen in the [[Trivia/{{Hours}} Trivia section]]).

to:

* OtherCommonMusicVideoConcepts - -- Band from Mundania:
** Both the official ''[='hours...'=]'' videos put Bowie in domestic settings and then ease in fantasy elements. In "Thursday's Child", he and his current lover are getting ready for bed when in the bathroom mirror he sees a reflection of his younger self and an old lover. In "Survive", he broods alone in a cluttered kitchen over a romantic breakup breakup-- and then gravity goes askew. The unreleased video for "The Pretty Things Are Going to Hell" would kept the trend as well (see WhatCouldHaveBeen in the [[Trivia/{{Hours}} Trivia section]]).



* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one (six if you count ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).

to:

* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one (six if you count ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).SelfTitledAlbum).
* VariantCovers:
** Initial pressings of the CD release feature a lenticular cover, meant to evoke a [=3D=] effect with both the two Bowies and the hallway they're lying in. Later releases simply used a regular print of the image.
** For reasons unknown, the spinal portion of the tray art featured different backgrounds between the initial UK/European and US CD releases. The UK/European version featured a series of orange stripes similar to the ones throughout the rest of the album art, with the "davidbowie.com" text in white and in the same font as his logotype on the front cover The US version, meanwhile, features a white background for the spinal portion of the tray art, with the "davidbowie.com" text being in a mock barcode. Some releases across regions completely omit this portion altogether, leaving a solid white background on the upper spine.
** Some versions of the album totally omit the text, stripes, and mock barcodes from the front cover, leaving just the main image against a white background.


* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one (six if you discount ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).

to:

* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one (six if you discount count ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).


* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's four albums that doesn't feature one.

to:

* TitleTrack: One of Bowie's four albums five albums[[note]]alongside ''Music/DavidBowie1967'', ''Music/HunkyDory'', ''Music/LowDavidBowieAlbum'', and ''Music/{{Lodger}}''[[/note]] that doesn't feature one.one (six if you discount ''Music/SpaceOddity'', which was originally a SelfTitledAlbum).

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