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'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltán Kodály, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as [[Music/FryderykChopin Frédéric Chopin]], Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.

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'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) Béla Viktor János Bartók (25 March 1881 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltán Kodály, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as [[Music/FryderykChopin Frédéric Chopin]], Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.


However, he wasn't a traditionalist or a nationalist. Bartók recorded all traditional peasant songs he could find, also for folklorist purposes, but used the material as an inspiration for his own AvantGardeMusic compositions. Some motifs and melodies in his work are recognizable peasant melodies, but other passages are his own material. He also quickly discovered that there ''wasn't'' a true ''national'' music at all. Some melodies he heard while travelling in Romania were similar to music he heard in Hungary or even in Morocco. Bartók mixed [[WorldMusic influences from all over the world]], including Balinese gamelan music and Chinese and Japanese influences.

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However, he wasn't a traditionalist or a nationalist. Bartók recorded all traditional peasant songs he could find, also for folklorist purposes, but used the material as an inspiration for his own AvantGardeMusic compositions. Some motifs and melodies in his work are recognizable peasant melodies, but other passages are his own material. He also quickly discovered that there ''wasn't'' a true ''national'' music at all. Some melodies he heard while travelling in Romania were similar to music he heard in Hungary or even in Morocco. Bartók mixed [[WorldMusic influences from all over the world]], including Balinese gamelan music and Chinese and Japanese influences.


* RuleOfThree: In his ballet The Miraculous Mandarin, three tramps coerce a girl into prostitution. The girl then dances to seduce three men, the last of which is the eponymous Mandarin. The tramps then attempt to kill the Mandarin in three different ways: asphyxiation, stabbing (thrice!), and hanging.



* RuleOfThree: In his ballet The Miraculous Mandarin, three tramps coerce a girl into prostitution. The girl then dances to seduce three men, the last of which is the eponymous Mandarin. The tramps then attempt to kill the Mandarin there different ways: asphyxiation, stabbing (thrice!), and hanging.


* RuleOfThree: In his ballet The Miraculous Mandarin, three tramps coerce a girl into prostitution. The girl then dances to attract three men, the last of which is the eponymous Mandarin. The tramps then attempt to kill the Mandarin there different ways: asphyxiation, stabbing (thrice!), and hanging. None of them work.

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* RuleOfThree: In his ballet The Miraculous Mandarin, three tramps coerce a girl into prostitution. The girl then dances to attract seduce three men, the last of which is the eponymous Mandarin. The tramps then attempt to kill the Mandarin there different ways: asphyxiation, stabbing (thrice!), and hanging. None of them work.

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* RuleOfThree: In his ballet The Miraculous Mandarin, three tramps coerce a girl into prostitution. The girl then dances to attract three men, the last of which is the eponymous Mandarin. The tramps then attempt to kill the Mandarin there different ways: asphyxiation, stabbing (thrice!), and hanging. None of them work.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/BartokTheMagnificent'' feature a white bat named Bartok. Now that we've mentioned this, forget it, for it has nothing to do with him whatsoever. In fact, the bat character is [[DubNameChange renamed to "Bartek"]] in the Hungarian dub, to avoid any confusion with the composer.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/BartokTheMagnificent'' feature a white bat named Bartok. Now that we've mentioned this, forget it, for it has nothing to do with him whatsoever. In fact, the bat character is [[DubNameChange renamed to "Bartek"]] in the Hungarian dub, dub of the films, to avoid any confusion with the composer.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/BartokTheMagnificent'' feature a white bat named Bartok. Now that we've mentioned this, forget it, for it has nothing to do with him whatsoever.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/BartokTheMagnificent'' feature a white bat named Bartok. Now that we've mentioned this, forget it, for it has nothing to do with him whatsoever. In fact, the bat character is [[DubNameChange renamed to "Bartek"]] in the Hungarian dub, to avoid any confusion with the composer.


His most famous works are ''Mikrokosmos'', Romanian Dances, ''Dance Suite'', his three Piano Concertos, ''Music For Strings, Percussion And Celesta'', and the Concerto For Orchestra, which is considered to be his MagnumOpus.

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His most famous works are ''Mikrokosmos'', Romanian Dances, ''Dance Suite'', his three Piano Concertos, ''Music For Strings, Percussion And Celesta'', and the Concerto For Orchestra, which is considered to be his MagnumOpus.
Orchestra.


'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltan Kodàly, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as [[Music/FryderykChopin Frédéric Chopin]], Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.

to:

'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltan Kodàly, Zoltán Kodály, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as [[Music/FryderykChopin Frédéric Chopin]], Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.


'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltan Kodàly, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as Music/FryderykChopin, Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.

to:

'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltan Kodàly, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as Music/FryderykChopin, [[Music/FryderykChopin Frédéric Chopin]], Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.


* Music/FrankZappa's line about the "walls weeping greenish drops" during "The Torture Never Stops" from ''Music/ZootAllures'' (1976) is a reference to Bartók's "Bluebeard's Castle". Zappa also covered Bartók's Third Piano Concerto live on "Make A Jazz Noise Here" (1988), because it was his favorite Bartók piece. He even claimed "it almost made me cry the first time I heard it."

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* Music/FrankZappa's line about the "walls weeping greenish drops" during "The Torture Never Stops" from ''Music/ZootAllures'' (1976) is a reference to Bartók's "Bluebeard's Castle". Zappa also covered Bartók's Third Piano Concerto live on "Make A Jazz Noise Here" "Music/MakeAJazzNoiseHere" (1988), because it was his favorite Bartók piece. He even claimed "it almost made me cry the first time I heard it."


* Szelenyi has a piece aptly titled "Changing Bars." There are only four places where it stays in the same meter for two measures in a row. The rest of the time it alternates between 2/8, 3/8, and 4/8 with no apparent logic behind it.

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* ** Szelenyi has a piece aptly titled "Changing Bars." There are only four places where it stays in the same meter for two measures in a row. The rest of the time it alternates between 2/8, 3/8, and 4/8 with no apparent logic behind it.

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* UncommonTime: This frequently occurs under the heading "Bulgarian Rhythm":
** The Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm from ''Mikrokosmos'' are respectively in (4+2+3)/8, (2+2+3)/8, (2+3)/8, (3+2+3)/8, (2+2+2+3)/8 and (3+3+2)/8.
** The Scherzo alla bulgarese from the Fifth String Quartet is in (4+2+3)/8; its trio varies between (3+2+2+3)/8, (2+3+2+3)/8 and (2+3+3+2)/8, but is really too fast for the average listener to bother counting metrical divisions.
** The Intermezzo interrotto from the Concerto for Orchestra has a main theme alternating between 2/4 and 5/8. It rather sneakily shifts into CommonTime after a modulation, but this turns out to be the setup for a musical joke.
* Szelenyi has a piece aptly titled "Changing Bars." There are only four places where it stays in the same meter for two measures in a row. The rest of the time it alternates between 2/8, 3/8, and 4/8 with no apparent logic behind it.


'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltan Kodàly, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as Music/FryderykChopin, Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional folk music in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.

to:

'''Béla Bartók''' (1883-1945) was a Hungarian composer, widely regarded as one of the most important musicians of the 20th century. He is widely renowned for his interest in traditional peasant's music, which he collected together with his composer friend Zoltan Kodàly, travelling in Eastern Europe and North Africa. Bartók was enarmored by the authenticity and originality of this music. While other Eastern European composers such as Music/FryderykChopin, Music/FranzLiszt and Music/AntoninDvorak had also used influences of traditional folk music FolkMusic in their work Bartók was the first to keep the primitive rawness of the peasant's music intact. As a result his music sometimes sounds nightmarish, but there are also moments that are so moving that it makes you cry.



* AlliterativeName: "'''B'''éla '''B'''artók".



* InHarmonyWithNature: Bartók's music is deeply ingrained in nature, even referencing this in individual pieces, such as "Bear Dance".

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* DarkerAndEdgier: He wasn't the first composer to be influenced by traditional music, but he was the first to maintain the harsh, rural atmosphere of the pieces he heard, not sugarcoating the sound.
* FolkMusic: He used folk music as the basis for his on work, building up a huge collection of field recordings of authentic peasant's music from Eastern Europe, North Africa and Asia.
* HeavyMeta: "Concerto For Orchestra" is an orchestra played by an orchestra.
* InHarmonyWithNature: Bartók's music is deeply ingrained in nature, even referencing this in individual pieces, such as "Bear Dance". Bartók composed quite some mood pieces, characterised by slow movements, making use of eerie dissonances, comparable to the lonely sounds of nature at night. Musicologists gave them the nickname "night music". One piece of "Out Of Doors" is typical of this style and called "The Night's Music".


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* PublicDomainSoundtrack: His compositions frequently quote from traditional music, which he collected on countless field recordings for which he crossed large parts of rural Eastern Europe and Northern Africa, accompanied by his colleague Zoltan Kodàly. Since this music was so ancient he didn't have to pay royalties for it.
* SpellMyNameWithAnS: His name is frequently misspelled with either the accents missing or facing the wrong side.


* AlwaysNight: Bartók composed quite some mood pieces, characterised by slow movements, making use of eerie dissonances, comparable to the lonely sounds of nature at night. Musicologists gave them the nickname "night music". One piece of "Out Of Doors" is typical of this style and called "The Night's Music".

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