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** "Can't Stop The Dob/Fool The Fingers", which declines to "Dobstopper/Fingerstopper" when a contestant is GenreSavvy (or lucky) enough to beat Roger Dobkowitz's or Kathy Greco's NintendoHard setups. Also applies in hindsight to "Can't Jive The Jay", for original producer Jay Wolpert's own hard setups (most notably, as seen on the DVD set, a 1975 Oldsmobile Delta 88 convertible costing $7,010 that was used in Lucky Seven).

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** "Can't Stop The Dob/Fool The Fingers", which declines to "Dobstopper/Fingerstopper" when a contestant is GenreSavvy (or lucky) enough able to beat Roger Dobkowitz's or Kathy Greco's NintendoHard setups. Also applies in hindsight to "Can't Jive The Jay", for original producer Jay Wolpert's own hard setups (most notably, as seen on the DVD set, a 1975 Oldsmobile Delta 88 convertible costing $7,010 that was used in Lucky Seven).


* Top winners always pick the car/runner-up always gets the trips. [[labelnote:Explanation]]Contestants who have won the most cash value from their prizes who go to the Showcase get the advantage of whether or not to bid or pass on the first Showcase. This usually leads to them seeking out the Showcase with the vehicle, while the other Showcase generally offers a vacationer's trip, which gets passed up by the top winner and saddled to the runner-up.[[/labelnote]]

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* Top winners always pick the car/runner-up always gets the trips. [[labelnote:Explanation]]Contestants who have won the most cash value from their prizes who go to the Showcase get the advantage of whether or not to bid or pass on the first Showcase. This usually leads to them seeking out the Showcase with the vehicle, while the other Showcase generally offers a vacationer's trip, which gets passed up by the top winner and saddled to the runner-up.[[/labelnote]]
* El Cheapo [[labelnote:Explanation]]Funny nickname used to describe choices on Money Game that start with "0" (such as "04"), which are so uncommon that [[CaptainObviousReveal they almost always signify what the last two numbers of the price of a car are]], which started in the Bob Barker era when a contestant exclaimed these words and won the car by choosing said numbers.
[[/labelnote]]


* Top winners always pick the car/runner-up always gets the trips. [[labelnote:Explanation]]Contestants who have won the most cash value from their prizes who go to the Showcase get the advantage of whether or not to bid or pass on the first Showcase. This usually leads to them seeking out the Showcase with the vehicle, while the other Showcase generally offers a vacationer's trip, which gets passed or passed up by the top winner and saddled to the runner-up.[[/labelnote]]

to:

* Top winners always pick the car/runner-up always gets the trips. [[labelnote:Explanation]]Contestants who have won the most cash value from their prizes who go to the Showcase get the advantage of whether or not to bid or pass on the first Showcase. This usually leads to them seeking out the Showcase with the vehicle, while the other Showcase generally offers a vacationer's trip, which gets passed or passed up by the top winner and saddled to the runner-up.[[/labelnote]]


** "First Four Breakfast Club/Midday Revue" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Any First Four contestants (the first four called down at the top of the show) who are still in Contestant's Row following the sixth One-Bid; [[TheDrewCareyShow Mimi Bobeck]] got her own wing when Drew became host).[[/labelnote]]

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** "First Four Breakfast Club/Midday Revue" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Any First Four contestants (the first four called down at the top of the show) who are still in Contestant's Row following the sixth One-Bid; [[TheDrewCareyShow [[Series/TheDrewCareyShow Mimi Bobeck]] got her own wing when Drew became host).[[/labelnote]]


** "El Skunko"[[labelnote:Explanation]]For shows in which all six pricing games were lost outright, including one or more games that were played particularly poorly.[[/labelnote]]

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** "Skunk"[[labelnote:Explanation]]For shows in which all six pricing games were lost outright, including one or more games that were played particularly poorly.[[/labelnote]]
***
"El Skunko"[[labelnote:Explanation]]For shows in which all six pricing games were lost outright, including one or more games that were played particularly poorly.and both contestants overbid on their showcases.[[/labelnote]]


** "$420, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Some contestants [[DudeNotFunny think it's funny]] to repeatedly make this bid. It's slang for marijuana usage. It was made popular as a bid by a contestant who decided to bid that amount for the entire show. Other similar-minded bids include various numbers containing "69" (the sex pose), as well as outrageous bids like ''$2,000,000.''[[/labelnote]]

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** "$420, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Some contestants [[DudeNotFunny [[NeverHeardThatOneBefore think it's funny]] to repeatedly make this bid. It's slang for marijuana usage. It was made popular as a bid by a contestant who decided to bid that amount for the entire show. Other similar-minded bids include various numbers containing "69" (the (Get it? Like the sex pose), pose? Geddit?), as well as outrageous bids like ''$2,000,000.''[[/labelnote]]


** "Exacta"
** "Wipeout"
** "El Skunko"
** "Can't Stop The Dob/Fool The Fingers", which declines to "Dobstopper/Fingerstopper" when a contestant is GenreSavvy (or lucky) enough to beat Roger Dobkowitz's or Kathy Greco's NintendoHard setups. Also applies in hindsight to "Can't Jive The Jay", for original producer Jay Wolpert's own hard setups (most notably, as seen on the DVD set, a $7,010 car used in Lucky Seven).

to:

** "Exacta"
"Exacta"[[labelnote:Explanation]]For a perfectly played game. (For example, in Switcheroo, getting all five prices correct on the first try.)[[/labelnote]]
** "Wipeout"
"Wipeout"[[labelnote:Explanation]]For a game in which -- where getting at least one pricing question right is required to play the payoff portion of the game -- none of the questions were answered correctly. (For instance, getting all four questions wrong on games like Master Key, Rat Race, Shell Game, Bonus Game, etc.) Or, a very poorly playing of Lucky Seven (where the first number chosen costs the player all seven dollars.)[[/labelnote]]
** "El Skunko"
Skunko"[[labelnote:Explanation]]For shows in which all six pricing games were lost outright, including one or more games that were played particularly poorly.[[/labelnote]]
** "Can't Stop The Dob/Fool The Fingers", which declines to "Dobstopper/Fingerstopper" when a contestant is GenreSavvy (or lucky) enough to beat Roger Dobkowitz's or Kathy Greco's NintendoHard setups. Also applies in hindsight to "Can't Jive The Jay", for original producer Jay Wolpert's own hard setups (most notably, as seen on the DVD set, a 1975 Oldsmobile Delta 88 convertible costing $7,010 car that was used in Lucky Seven).


** "$420, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Some contestants [[DudeNotFunny think it's funny]] to repeatedly make this bid. Other similar-minded bids include various numbers containing "69", as well as outrageous bids like ''$2,000,000.''[[/labelnote]]

to:

** "$420, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Some contestants [[DudeNotFunny think it's funny]] to repeatedly make this bid. It's slang for marijuana usage. It was made popular as a bid by a contestant who decided to bid that amount for the entire show. Other similar-minded bids include various numbers containing "69", "69" (the sex pose), as well as outrageous bids like ''$2,000,000.''[[/labelnote]]


* Top winners always pick the car.

to:

* Top winners always pick the car.car/runner-up always gets the trips. [[labelnote:Explanation]]Contestants who have won the most cash value from their prizes who go to the Showcase get the advantage of whether or not to bid or pass on the first Showcase. This usually leads to them seeking out the Showcase with the vehicle, while the other Showcase generally offers a vacationer's trip, which gets passed or passed up by the top winner and saddled to the runner-up.[[/labelnote]]


* Bob Barker's tendency to tease and troll contestants with the reveal of a price in a game by appearing to uncover it... then back away... do it again... back away, and then finally reveal the price just as a contestant is about to explode from the suspense.

to:

* Bob Barker's tendency to tease and troll contestants with the reveal of a price in a game by appearing to uncover it... then back away... do it again... back away, and then finally reveal the price just as a contestant is about to explode from the suspense.suspense.
* Top winners always pick the car.


* "Once it's stopped, we can't start it again for 37 hours." [[labelnote:Explanation]]In his later years, Bob Barker made this joke every time he explained the rules of Range Game, to emphasize that the contestants can only stop the range finder once. Drew Carey attempted this joke on his first playing, but butchered it; to be fair, this had become a DiscreditedMeme by this point anyway.[[/labelnote]]

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* "Once it's stopped, we can't start it again for 37 hours." [[labelnote:Explanation]]In his later years, Bob Barker made this joke every time he explained the rules of Range Game, to emphasize that the contestants can only stop the range finder once. Drew Carey attempted this joke on his first playing, but butchered it; to be fair, this had become a DiscreditedMeme by this point anyway.[[/labelnote]][[/labelnote]]
* Bob Barker's tendency to tease and troll contestants with the reveal of a price in a game by appearing to uncover it... then back away... do it again... back away, and then finally reveal the price just as a contestant is about to explode from the suspense.


** "$420, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Some contestants think it's funny to repeatedly make this bid. Other similar-minded bids include various numbers containing "69", as well as outrageous bids like $2,000,000.[[/labelnote]]

to:

** "$420, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Some contestants [[DudeNotFunny think it's funny funny]] to repeatedly make this bid. Other similar-minded bids include various numbers containing "69", as well as outrageous bids like $2,000,000.[[/labelnote]]''$2,000,000.''[[/labelnote]]


** "$X+1, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Conversely, if they thought all three had underbid, they would bid $1 above the highest bid. If two players had, they'd bid $1 above the next-highest. Players absolutely hated being hit with this. Consider it [[VideogameCrueltyPotential game show cruelty potential.[[/labelnote]]

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** "$X+1, Bob/Drew!" [[labelnote:Explanation]]Conversely, if they thought all three had underbid, they would bid $1 above the highest bid. If two players had, they'd bid $1 above the next-highest. Players absolutely hated being hit with this. Consider it [[VideogameCrueltyPotential game show cruelty potential.potential]].[[/labelnote]]

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