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* ''Literature/{{Wicked}}'' (the book, not the [[Theatre/{{Wicked}} musical]]) has been seen by critics as a metaphor not only for Nazism/Fascism but also for Nixonian politics. Then again, it may have been intentional...

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* ''Literature/{{Wicked}}'' ''Literature/TheWickedYears'' (the book, book series, not the [[Theatre/{{Wicked}} musical]]) musical adaptation]]) has been seen by critics as a metaphor not only for Nazism/Fascism but also for Nixonian politics. Then again, it may have been intentional...



* Website/{{Tumblr}} is ''(in)famous'' for its fondness of this trope.


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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': The FantasticRacism towards [[LittleBitBeastly Faunus]] veers into the degree of DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything for much of the fandom. Several of the major Faunus characters are POC-coded (Blake and Sun having Asian-inspired designs and Ilia being AmbiguouslyBrown), which adds onto this. Some fans also take Weiss' Volume 1 distrust of Faunus this way as Weiss has a German name.


** The Framework reality in the final third of Season 4 has so much reference to 2017 American politics it cannot be called parallel:
*** The Hydra controlled government use more drones to surveil its citizens.

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** The Framework reality in the final third of Season 4 has so much reference many references to 2017 American politics it they cannot be called parallel:
parallels:
*** The Hydra controlled HYDRA-controlled government use more drones to surveil its citizens.

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Fairy Tales]]
* "Little Jack Horner" is a NurseryRhyme about a hungry boy that dips his finger in some pie. Since the 1700s, it's been interpreted as being political. It's been seen as being about opportunism, being antiauthoritarian, being anticlerical, etc.
[[/folder]]





* While WordOfGod has stated that ''Series/BreakingBad'' is a story of how "Mr. Chips became Scarface," the original driving force behind Walt's meth manufacturing; to help pay for his medical bills, has prompted pro-single payer health care advocates in the US to use the show to [[http://www.anorak.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/breaking-bad-in-the-UK.jpg highlight the issue of health care costs in the United States,]] as well as the War on Drugs. Even the creator has [[http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/news/bryan-cranston-on-the-joy-of-cooking-meth-obamacare-and-malcolm-in-the-middle-20110610 claimed]] that the show could not be set anywhere else but the United States.
* Both political parties, Democrat and Republican, see [[TheEmpire The Alliance]] in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' as the other and the Browncoats as themselves. WordOfGod says that was an accident.
* A rather odd example is ''Series/ThatsMyBush''. Despite being created by Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone and featuring the former President's administration and family as characters, it wasn't intended as political satire, but rather a parody of cookie cutter 80s sitcoms. (Parker and Stone admitted that, just in case things had gone the other way, they also had a pitch for a sitcom about Al Gore, and said they would have used more or less the same jokes no matter who'd actually won.)



* Much of the internet, including some professional critics, stated that Series/LukeCage was a commentary on police brutality towards black men. Some of the show's creators even encouraged this sort of thinking, doing things like having Luke wear a black hoodie (which has become symbolic of the Trayvon Martin shooting), and remarking that it was time for a bulletproof black superhero. News outlets like Britain's Guardian had articles like 'A Bulletproof Black Man: Luke Cage is the superhero America needs now.' The actual show doesn't really say much about the matter; it focuses more on gang violence and Luke only comes into conflict with police after being framed for a crime (and even then, they don't use excessive force).

to:

* Much ''Series/TheAmericans'': A show that glamorizes UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar with BigBad DirtyCommunists all over the place, on Creator/{{Fox|News Channel}}? It's almost too easy...
** It takes a pretty nuanced view of what the KGB sleepers do, as well as showing the less-than-savory methods the FBI Counterintelligence people get up to.
* ''Series/{{Babylon}}'' had as one of its central plot threads the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by police officers. Rather awkwardly, shortly after the series started broadcasting in Britain (and shortly before its American broadcast), this suddenly became a very, very, hot-button issue.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' has been decried as leftist propaganda specifically made to decry the [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Bush administration]]. This moves into CriticalResearchFailure, since ''B5'' '''ended''' two years before Bush was elected President. Oops.
** {{President Evil}}s are an atavistic evil archetype in what might as well be called American mythology. Practically every American president was roughly comparable to President Clark [[{{Demonization}} if you believe the opposition]]. Drawing from this folklore, is in a sense no different then appealing to Babylonian myth.
** Besides, President Clark bears a resemblance to UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson, particularly since he comes to office with the assassination of his predecessor (the image of his inauguration looks just like the famous photo of Johnson's), that he turns out to have orchestrated, as some RealLife {{Conspiracy Theorist}}s claim [[WhoShotJFK happened]] with UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy.
** JMS has written several episodes where he purposefully did not take a stand in the issue presented, but rather presented both sides and let the viewers draw their own conclusions. This hasn't stopped many people from claiming that such episodes are clearly (for/against) (their views/views opposing their own). One example of an inversion of this trope is the episode ''Confessions and Lamentations'', which is about a fresh outbreak of an alien disease that was believed to be spread through immoral behavior. A lot of people claimed this episode was meant as an allegory for AIDS, missing the fact that it's a closer parallel to the Black Death (which is even discussed in the episode itself). JMS has gone on record as stating that the point
of the internet, including some professional critics, stated episode was to say that Series/LukeCage was politicizing a commentary on police brutality towards black men. Some disease is never a good idea. He did, however, explicitly compare the Clark administration to George W. Bush in one of the show's creators even encouraged this sort DVD commentaries.
--->'''Creator/JMichaelStraczynski''': A lot
of thinking, doing our episodes are [[{{Applicability}} constructed to work as mirrors]]; you see what you put into it. "Believers" has been interpreted as pro- religion, anti-religion, and religion-neutral... "Quality" has been interpreted, as you note, as pro-capital punishment, and anti-capital punishment. We do, as you say, much prefer to leave the decision on what things like having Luke wear a black hoodie (which has become symbolic of mean to the Trayvon Martin shooting), viewer to hash out. A good story should provoke discussion, debate, argument... [[BarBrawl and remarking that it was time for a bulletproof black superhero. News outlets like Britain's Guardian had articles like 'A Bulletproof Black Man: Luke Cage is the superhero America needs now.' The actual show doesn't really say much about the matter; it focuses more on gang violence and Luke only comes into conflict with police after being framed for a crime (and even then, they don't use excessive force).occasional bar fight]].



* The third season of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' drew heavily on current events. Earth is savagely attacked, apparently out of nowhere, and the NX-01 (bringing along a cohort of SpaceMarines) heads into a treacherous region of space to find the culprits. Many fans were afraid this storyline would be untrue to ''Trek'''s philosophy, but they needn't have worried: the aliens aren't all bad (though there are a few problems - like that the most humanoid ones get a FaceHeelTurn but the [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent reptilian]] Xindi stay evil (although [[YouHaveFailedMe you wouldn't say no to]] [[BadBoss the head reptile, either]]) and the [[BigCreepyCrawlies insectoids]] [[strike: stay evil]] get cold feet while in transit to Earth and are blown up by the reptilians for their troubles), Archer's new hard-edged attitude isn't always endorsed, and there's enough ambiguity all round to keep it from being StrawmanPolitical in either direction.
** Prior to that, a couple of first-season episodes -- "Fortunate Son" and especially "Detained" -- examined elements of the war on terror. But contrary to a common assumption, the decision to name the first season's bad guys "Suliban" happened long before 9/11. They ''were'' named after the Taliban, but only because Rick Berman thought that name had the exotic sound he wanted; [[FunnyAneurysmMoment no one was expecting it to become a household name]].
* A book claimed that ''Series/StargateSG1'' was white supremacist propaganda.
** This claim may be inspired by the fact that the ''only'' religion of old (and by extension its "gods", i.e. the aliens standing in as these gods, or who inspired it) that is portrayed as good is Myth/NorseMythology. Said "gods" are a race of [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Sufficiently Advanced]] [[TheGreys Grey Aliens]] called Asgard, who regularly help Earth (and the teams of the Stargate Command in particular, who earned their trust), while otherwise posing as benevolent gods to less advanced societies in the few times they show up on their planets. Basically any other religion that shows up is staffed by Goa'uld, who are always evil and incredibly selfish (there is one exception in Lord Yu, who never claimed to be a God, and who was the first Chinese Emperor).
** There is also an exception for the Abrahamic religions. Christianity gets directly mentioned exactly once in the series, and then in a (more or less) positive light. The TrueCompanions travel to a world where the people were culled from MiddleAges England. Daniel posits a theory (which turns out to be wrong) that the Goa'uld who controls this world may be posing as the {{God}} of the Abrahamic faiths. Teal'c dismisses this idea, stating that he's read Literature/TheBible and finds it impossible to imagine that any Goa'uld could be as benevolent as the deity from that book. Meanwhile the other two, Islam and Judaism, are never adressed at all. There ''is'' however a Goa'uld who poses as {{Satan}} and turned a planet/moon into hell just because he could.
** Others interpreted it as the final victory of science over religion, fought by heroic atheists and liberated ex-faithful against an amalgamation of the leaders of the world's faiths.
*** The series does make the point that gods aren't defined by their powers, but rather by their actions and benevolence. The Goa'uld and the Ori, who abuse their [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens positions of privilege]] over their subjects, are not fit to act as gods over the people they rule. This was probably intentional, but considering Daniel's statements about fire being bad (the Ori use fire as a good symbolism, even choosing to appear as it instead of the default ascended light form) coming from the Ancients, it doesn't seem to mean they were against Christianity.
*** It's important to note that, while this is mostly in the background and not heavily discussed, the main characters themselves are shown as being on different wavelengths when it comes to religion. Jack O'Neill is snarkily irreverent and cynical towards religion in pretty much all its forms. Cam Mitchell tends to be positive about it, mostly through anecdotes about his very religious grandmother, but it's unclear whether or how much he himself believes the same things. Samantha Carter, in the face of her possible death, expressed the hope that after all of her work convincing enslaved people that they were following false gods, "somewhere one of those gods" was real. Her father, Jacob/Sel'mak, is openly a believer. The series supports religious tolerance (and the additional aesop that pretending to be a god in order to exploit people is bad), but it's hard to find a strong stance for or against religion per se. The series doesn't even condemn paganism, as it's never clear whether the Goa'uld created/inspired the ancient religions or simply decided to impersonate its deities (most clues given point at the former, though).
* [[http://www.slate.com/id/2177380/pagenum/all/ This Slate article]], which explains that Jerry Series/{{Seinfeld}} and his comedy routine represents conformity and lack of identity in a totalitarian government. Um... right.
** ''Slate'' (and to a lesser extent ''Salon'') absolutely loves this trope. Any even remotely popular pop culture phenomenon eventually becomes the victim of a pretentious, middlebrow ''Slate'' article that tries to analyze it and wring out some sort of important insight concerning our society. The [[JumpingTheShark nadir]] was probably [[http://www.slate.com/id/2111762/ this piece]], an earnest, serious 1,300-word examination of....UglyGuyHotWife.
*** [[http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2008/11/15/pathos_lolcats/ I can has pretenshis midulbrow analusis?]]
*** Heather Havrilesky, in her regular TV show review column for Salon.com, has a tendency to embrace this trope. Particularly when reviewing reality television, for some reason.
*** What is particularly funny about the ''Slate'' article is that UglyGuyHotWife is actually a trope that can be analyzed - it is part the basic OddCouple dynamic that provides comedy, and having one of them be ugly is a visual shorthand that enhance this. The reason the ugly one is male is because of society's traditional (and outdated) expectation that women should take pains to look nice. The article mentions precisely none of this (presumably because it is too ''bloody obvious''), instead attributing it to bizarre subconscious desires by men and women, and the whole thing ends being patronizing to both sexes.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' has been decried as leftist propaganda specifically made to decry the [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Bush administration]]. This moves into CriticalResearchFailure, since ''B5'' '''ended''' two years before Bush was elected President. Oops.
** {{President Evil}}s are an atavistic evil archetype in what might as well be called American mythology. Practically every American president was roughly comparable to President Clark [[{{Demonization}} if you believe the opposition]]. Drawing from this folklore, is in a sense no different then appealing to Babylonian myth.
** Besides, President Clark bears a resemblance to UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson, particularly since he comes to office with the assassination of his predecessor (the image of his inauguration looks just like the famous photo of Johnson's), that he turns out to have orchestrated, as some RealLife {{Conspiracy Theorist}}s claim [[WhoShotJFK happened]] with UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy.
** JMS has written several episodes where he purposefully did not take a stand in the issue presented, but rather presented both sides and let the viewers draw their own conclusions. This hasn't stopped many people from claiming that such episodes are clearly (for/against) (their views/views opposing their own). One example of an inversion of this trope is the episode ''Confessions and Lamentations'', which is about a fresh outbreak of an alien disease that was believed to be spread through immoral behavior. A lot of people claimed this episode was meant as an allegory for AIDS, missing the fact that it's a closer parallel to the Black Death (which is even discussed in the episode itself). JMS has gone on record as stating that the point of the episode was to say that politicizing a disease is never a good idea. He did, however, explicitly compare the Clark administration to George W. Bush in one of the DVD commentaries.
--->'''Creator/JMichaelStraczynski''': A lot of our episodes are [[{{Applicability}} constructed to work as mirrors]]; you see what you put into it. "Believers" has been interpreted as pro- religion, anti-religion, and religion-neutral... "Quality" has been interpreted, as you note, as pro-capital punishment, and anti-capital punishment. We do, as you say, much prefer to leave the decision on what things mean to the viewer to hash out. A good story should provoke discussion, debate, argument... [[BarBrawl and the occasional bar fight]].
* The Visitors in ''Series/{{V 2009}}'' have been interpreted as symbolizing UsefulNotes/BarackObama. This isn't helped by the fact that the show's plot (the alien Visitors, who receive the devotion of the people, are secretly plotting to destroy the world) bears a lot of similarities to various right-wing fears about Obama -- compare the Visitors' alien nature to the [[UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories "birther" conspiracy]]. Doesn't really help when the aliens provide "Universal Healthcare", and call it spreading hope... The writers have denied this, and claimed that the show is more about post-9/11 America than the current President.
* The children's television show ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}'' was accused of promoting the homosexual agenda to children.
** It was also (more than once) accused of promoting communism, conformity, lack of critical thinking and a "the state takes care of everything" mentality (or a "everything should be free" mentality). Proponents of this tend to point fingers at Social Justice Warriors, which fit the bill more often than not, but there's definitely more responsible under the surface than a TV show made for babies.

to:

* The third season of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' drew heavily on current events. Earth is savagely attacked, apparently out of nowhere, and the NX-01 (bringing along a cohort of SpaceMarines) heads into a treacherous region of space to find the culprits. Many fans were afraid this storyline would be untrue to ''Trek'''s philosophy, but they needn't have worried: the aliens aren't all bad (though there are a few problems - like While WordOfGod has stated that ''Series/BreakingBad'' is a story of how "Mr. Chips became Scarface", the most humanoid ones get a FaceHeelTurn but the [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent reptilian]] Xindi stay evil (although [[YouHaveFailedMe you wouldn't say no to]] [[BadBoss the head reptile, either]]) and the [[BigCreepyCrawlies insectoids]] [[strike: stay evil]] get cold feet while in transit original driving force behind Walt's meth manufacturing; to Earth and are blown up by the reptilians for their troubles), Archer's new hard-edged attitude isn't always endorsed, and there's enough ambiguity all round to keep it from being StrawmanPolitical in either direction.
** Prior to that, a couple of first-season episodes -- "Fortunate Son" and especially "Detained" -- examined elements of the war on terror. But contrary to a common assumption, the decision to name the first season's bad guys "Suliban" happened long before 9/11. They ''were'' named after the Taliban, but only because Rick Berman thought that name had the exotic sound he wanted; [[FunnyAneurysmMoment no one was expecting it to become a household name]].
* A book claimed that ''Series/StargateSG1'' was white supremacist propaganda.
** This claim may be inspired by the fact that the ''only'' religion of old (and by extension its "gods", i.e. the aliens standing in as these gods, or who inspired it) that is portrayed as good is Myth/NorseMythology. Said "gods" are a race of [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Sufficiently Advanced]] [[TheGreys Grey Aliens]] called Asgard, who regularly
help Earth (and the teams of the Stargate Command in particular, who earned their trust), while otherwise posing as benevolent gods to less advanced societies pay for his medical bills, has prompted pro-single payer health care advocates in the few times they US to use the show up on their planets. Basically any other religion that shows up is staffed by Goa'uld, who are always evil and incredibly selfish (there is one exception in Lord Yu, who never claimed to be a God, and who was the first Chinese Emperor).
** There is also an exception for the Abrahamic religions. Christianity gets directly mentioned exactly once in the series, and then in a (more or less) positive light. The TrueCompanions travel to a world where the people were culled from MiddleAges England. Daniel posits a theory (which turns out to be wrong) that the Goa'uld who controls this world may be posing as the {{God}} of the Abrahamic faiths. Teal'c dismisses this idea, stating that he's read Literature/TheBible and finds it impossible to imagine that any Goa'uld could be as benevolent as the deity from that book. Meanwhile the other two, Islam and Judaism, are never adressed at all. There ''is'' however a Goa'uld who poses as {{Satan}} and turned a planet/moon into hell just because he could.
** Others interpreted it as the final victory of science over religion, fought by heroic atheists and liberated ex-faithful against an amalgamation of the leaders of the world's faiths.
*** The series does make the point that gods aren't defined by their powers, but rather by their actions and benevolence. The Goa'uld and the Ori, who abuse their [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens positions of privilege]] over their subjects, are not fit to act as gods over the people they rule. This was probably intentional, but considering Daniel's statements about fire being bad (the Ori use fire as a good symbolism, even choosing to appear as it instead of the default ascended light form) coming from the Ancients, it doesn't seem to mean they were against Christianity.
*** It's important to note that, while this is mostly in the background and not heavily discussed, the main characters themselves are shown as being on different wavelengths when it comes to religion. Jack O'Neill is snarkily irreverent and cynical towards religion in pretty much all its forms. Cam Mitchell tends to be positive about it, mostly through anecdotes about his very religious grandmother, but it's unclear whether or how much he himself believes the same things. Samantha Carter, in the face of her possible death, expressed the hope that after all of her work convincing enslaved people that they were following false gods, "somewhere one of those gods" was real. Her father, Jacob/Sel'mak, is openly a believer. The series supports religious tolerance (and the additional aesop that pretending to be a god in order to exploit people is bad), but it's hard to find a strong stance for or against religion per se. The series doesn't even condemn paganism, as it's never clear whether the Goa'uld created/inspired the ancient religions or simply decided to impersonate its deities (most clues given point at the former, though).
*
[[http://www.slate.com/id/2177380/pagenum/all/ This Slate article]], which explains that Jerry Series/{{Seinfeld}} and his comedy routine represents conformity and lack of identity in a totalitarian government. Um... right.
** ''Slate'' (and to a lesser extent ''Salon'') absolutely loves this trope. Any even remotely popular pop culture phenomenon eventually becomes
anorak.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/breaking-bad-in-the-UK.jpg highlight the victim issue of a pretentious, middlebrow ''Slate'' article that tries to analyze it and wring out some sort of important insight concerning our society. The [[JumpingTheShark nadir]] was probably health care costs in the United States,]] as well as the War on Drugs. Even the creator has [[http://www.slate.com/id/2111762/ this piece]], an earnest, serious 1,300-word examination of....UglyGuyHotWife.
*** [[http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2008/11/15/pathos_lolcats/ I can has pretenshis midulbrow analusis?]]
*** Heather Havrilesky, in her regular TV show review column for Salon.com, has a tendency to embrace this trope. Particularly when reviewing reality television, for some reason.
*** What is particularly funny about the ''Slate'' article is that UglyGuyHotWife is actually a trope that can be analyzed - it is part the basic OddCouple dynamic that provides comedy, and having one of them be ugly is a visual shorthand that enhance this. The reason the ugly one is male is because of society's traditional (and outdated) expectation that women should take pains to look nice. The article mentions precisely none of this (presumably because it is too ''bloody obvious''), instead attributing it to bizarre subconscious desires by men and women, and the whole thing ends being patronizing to both sexes.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' has been decried as leftist propaganda specifically made to decry the [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Bush administration]]. This moves into CriticalResearchFailure, since ''B5'' '''ended''' two years before Bush was elected President. Oops.
** {{President Evil}}s are an atavistic evil archetype in what might as well be called American mythology. Practically every American president was roughly comparable to President Clark [[{{Demonization}} if you believe the opposition]]. Drawing from this folklore, is in a sense no different then appealing to Babylonian myth.
** Besides, President Clark bears a resemblance to UsefulNotes/LyndonJohnson, particularly since he comes to office with the assassination of his predecessor (the image of his inauguration looks just like the famous photo of Johnson's), that he turns out to have orchestrated, as some RealLife {{Conspiracy Theorist}}s claim [[WhoShotJFK happened]] with UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy.
** JMS has written several episodes where he purposefully did not take a stand in the issue presented, but rather presented both sides and let the viewers draw their own conclusions. This hasn't stopped many people from claiming that such episodes are clearly (for/against) (their views/views opposing their own). One example of an inversion of this trope is the episode ''Confessions and Lamentations'', which is about a fresh outbreak of an alien disease that was believed to be spread through immoral behavior. A lot of people claimed this episode was meant as an allegory for AIDS, missing the fact that it's a closer parallel to the Black Death (which is even discussed in the episode itself). JMS has gone on record as stating that the point of the episode was to say that politicizing a disease is never a good idea. He did, however, explicitly compare the Clark administration to George W. Bush in one of the DVD commentaries.
--->'''Creator/JMichaelStraczynski''': A lot of our episodes are [[{{Applicability}} constructed to work as mirrors]]; you see what you put into it. "Believers" has been interpreted as pro- religion, anti-religion, and religion-neutral... "Quality" has been interpreted, as you note, as pro-capital punishment, and anti-capital punishment. We do, as you say, much prefer to leave the decision on what things mean to the viewer to hash out. A good story should provoke discussion, debate, argument... [[BarBrawl and the occasional bar fight]].
* The Visitors in ''Series/{{V 2009}}'' have been interpreted as symbolizing UsefulNotes/BarackObama. This isn't helped by the fact that the show's plot (the alien Visitors, who receive the devotion of the people, are secretly plotting to destroy the world) bears a lot of similarities to various right-wing fears about Obama -- compare the Visitors' alien nature to the [[UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories "birther" conspiracy]]. Doesn't really help when the aliens provide "Universal Healthcare", and call it spreading hope... The writers have denied this, and claimed
rollingstone.com/movies/news/bryan-cranston-on-the-joy-of-cooking-meth-obamacare-and-malcolm-in-the-middle-20110610 claimed]] that the show is more about post-9/11 America than could not be set anywhere else but the current President.
* The children's television show ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}'' was accused of promoting the homosexual agenda to children.
** It was also (more than once) accused of promoting communism, conformity, lack of critical thinking and a "the state takes care of everything" mentality (or a "everything should be free" mentality). Proponents of this tend to point fingers at Social Justice Warriors, which fit the bill more often than not, but there's definitely more responsible under the surface than a TV show made for babies.
United States.



** The general line in fan analysis is that "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E5TheWebPlanet The Web Planet]]" is a RedScare allegory, because it's about the Zarbi workers rising up against their Menoptera masters. But it's a ''really'' big reach - there's no absolutely no indication the Zarbi are any more intelligent than farm animals, and even though the monster in the story [[OurMonstersAreWeird has the power to control gold]] it doesn't work in any way analogous to any kind of economic system, which seems like it'd be a no-brainer for an anti-communism story. Maybe it's just a PlanetaryRomance {{Xenofiction}} runaround with pretty butterfly people fighting the ant people?
** It's well known "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers]]" is about [[AuthorTract the evils of taxation]] and written by a Thatcher supporter, but, since the actual story presents the issue more as 'untouchable mega-corporations and corrupt bankers have bought out the government and are draining money out of the poorest to boost their own profits while keeping the population constantly afraid via media to distract them', modern critics tend to read it as a satire on the evils of privatization, or Occupy-style anti-capitalist. Privatization was just around the corner in 1977, and the Occupy movement was 35 years away. Is it more likely that Creator/RobertHolmes was secretly hard-left and able to see the future, or that he was ramping up the setting's systemic injustice to the point he accidentally [[BrokenAesop broke his own right-wing aesop]]?
** In the Eighties, script editor Eric Saward purposefully tried to avoid political subtext as much as possible for a variety of reasons (lack of desire to offend, lack of desire to make allegorical stories about the real world in favor of interacting with the series' own history as a work of fiction, and several other reasons). This caused some BrokenAesop moments, like when the series bought back the highly political Silurians in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep an apolitical action story where nothing indicates either side is anything more than just a nasty lizard creature]] - and of course the politics ended up in there anyway. This restriction ended when producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner stopped caring, freeing the next script editor Andrew Cartmel to make clearly and transparently political stories about BBC politics ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E4TheGreatestShowInTheGalaxy The Greatest Show in the Galaxy]]"), UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E2TheHappinessPatrol The Happiness Patrol]]") and lesbianism ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E4Survival Survival]]").

to:

** The general line in fan analysis is that "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E5TheWebPlanet The Web Planet]]" is a RedScare allegory, because it's about the Zarbi workers rising up against their Menoptera masters. But it's a ''really'' big reach - there's no absolutely no indication the Zarbi are any more intelligent than farm animals, and even though the monster in the story [[OurMonstersAreWeird has the power to control gold]] it doesn't work in any way analogous to any kind of economic system, which seems like it'd be a no-brainer for an anti-communism story. Maybe it's just a PlanetaryRomance {{Xenofiction}} runaround with pretty butterfly people fighting the ant people?
** It's well known "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers]]" is about [[AuthorTract the evils of taxation]] and written by a Thatcher supporter, but, since the actual story presents the issue more as 'untouchable "untouchable mega-corporations and corrupt bankers have bought out the government and are draining money out of the poorest to boost their own profits while keeping the population constantly afraid via media to distract them', them", modern critics tend to read it as a satire on the evils of privatization, or Occupy-style anti-capitalist. Privatization was just around the corner in 1977, and the Occupy movement was 35 years away. Is it more likely that Creator/RobertHolmes was secretly hard-left and able to see the future, or that he was ramping up the setting's systemic injustice to the point he accidentally [[BrokenAesop broke his own right-wing aesop]]?
** In the Eighties, script editor Eric Saward purposefully tried to avoid political subtext as much as possible for a variety of reasons (lack of desire to offend, lack of desire to make allegorical stories about the real world in favor of interacting with the series' own history as a work of fiction, and several other reasons). This caused some BrokenAesop moments, like when the series bought back the highly political Silurians in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E1WarriorsOfTheDeep an apolitical action story where nothing indicates either side is anything more than just a nasty lizard creature]] - and of course the politics ended up in there anyway. This restriction ended when producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner stopped caring, freeing the next script editor Andrew Cartmel to make clearly and transparently political stories about BBC politics ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E4TheGreatestShowInTheGalaxy The Greatest Show in the Galaxy]]"), UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E2TheHappinessPatrol The Happiness Patrol]]") and lesbianism ("[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E4Survival Survival]]").



** Creator/MarkGatiss is often criticized for reactionary racist/sexist/warmongering {{Family Unfriendly Aesop}}s in his ''Who'' stories, but his real-world political leanings are known as left-wing. A lot of it may be down to bad luck - "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead The Unquiet Dead]]" (often read as an allegory for how war refugees should be treated with suspicion and can never assimilate into society) happened to come out at a time when asylum seekers were featured heavily in the news. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]" accidentally portrays mutually assured destruction as good, which might have gone unnoticed had the episode not synced up with the death of Margaret Thatcher. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E11TheCrimsonHorror The Crimson Horror]]" has Creator/DianaRigg playing the episode's EvilIsSexy NobleDemon star, who (just before it aired) went in the papers saying uninformed [[StrawFeminist things]] about feminists.

to:

** Creator/MarkGatiss is often criticized for reactionary racist/sexist/warmongering {{Family Unfriendly Aesop}}s in his ''Who'' stories, but his real-world political leanings are known as left-wing. A lot of it may be down to bad luck - "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead The Unquiet Dead]]" (often read as an allegory for how war refugees should be treated with suspicion and can never assimilate into society) happened to come out at a time when asylum seekers were featured heavily in the news. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E8ColdWar Cold War]]" accidentally portrays mutually assured destruction as good, which might have gone unnoticed had the episode not synced up with the death of Margaret Thatcher. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E11TheCrimsonHorror The Crimson Horror]]" has Creator/DianaRigg playing the episode's EvilIsSexy NobleDemon star, who (just before it aired) went in the papers saying uninformed [[StrawFeminist things]] about feminists.



--->'''Sally''': How can you know what I'm gonna say?\\
'''The Doctor''': Look to your left.\\
''Sally looks to her left, and sees Larry transcribing everything she says.''\\
'''Larry''': What does he mean by "look to your left"? I've written tons about that one. I think it's a political statement.

to:

--->'''Sally''': --->'''Sally:''' How can you know what I'm gonna say?\\
'''The Doctor''': Doctor:''' Look to your left.\\
''Sally ''[Sally looks to her left, and sees Larry transcribing everything she says.''\\
'''Larry''':
says]''\\
'''Larry:'''
What does he mean by "look to your left"? I've written tons about that one.on the forums. I think it's a political statement.\\
'''Sally:''' He means ''you''.



** [[https://them0vieblog.com/2017/05/21/doctor-who-extremis-review/ At least]] [[https://them0vieblog.com/2017/05/28/doctor-who-the-pyramid-at-the-end-of-the-world-review/ one blogger]] has interpreted "Extremis" and "The Pyramid At The End Of The World" as a reaction against the election of Donald Trump as US President and the UK's decision to leave the European Union. The view is slightly helped by the writer of the latter also writing "The Zygon Invasion" and "The Zygon Inversion" which is clearly an allegory for the political climate at the time regarding refugees and terrorists. It should also be noted this blogger does use EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory a lot.
* ''Series/TheAmericans'': A show that glamorizes UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar with BigBad DirtyCommunists all over the place, on Creator/{{Fox|News Channel}}? It's almost too easy...
** It takes a pretty nuanced view of what the KGB sleepers do, as well as showing the less-than-savory methods the FBI Counterintelligence people get up to.
* ''Series/{{Babylon}}'' had as one of its central plot threads the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by police officers. Rather awkwardly, shortly after the series started broadcasting in Britain (and shortly before its American broadcast), this suddenly became a very, very, hot-button issue.
* ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'': The 2018 revival is being treated as this due to Roseanne (the star and her character) being a supporter of UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump and clashing with her liberal daughter and granddaughter. The situation got worse when Trump gave Roseanne Barr a congratulatory phone call her and proclaimed to his base that the show "belongs to us", as well as evidence of Barr promoting anti-liberal conspiracy theories and satirical photos of her dressed up as Adolf Hitler resurfaced. In social media circles, the show is being called a mainstream bullhorn for the Trump movement, and it's gotten to the point where just watching it (or not) is being considered political act in and of itself.

to:

** [[https://them0vieblog.com/2017/05/21/doctor-who-extremis-review/ At least]] [[https://them0vieblog.com/2017/05/28/doctor-who-the-pyramid-at-the-end-of-the-world-review/ one blogger]] has interpreted "Extremis" [[Recap/DoctorWHoS36E6Extremis "Extremis"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E7ThePyramidAtTheEndOfTheWorld "The Pyramid At The at the End Of The World" of the World"]] as a reaction against the election of Donald Trump as US President and the UK's decision to leave the European Union. The view is slightly helped by the writer of the latter also writing [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E7TheZygonInvasion "The Zygon Invasion" Invasion"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E8TheZygonInversion "The Zygon Inversion" Inversion"]], which is clearly an allegory for the political climate at the time regarding refugees and terrorists. It should also be noted this blogger does use EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory a lot.
* ''Series/TheAmericans'': A show that glamorizes UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar with BigBad DirtyCommunists all over the place, on Creator/{{Fox|News Channel}}? It's almost too easy...
** It takes a pretty nuanced view of what the KGB sleepers do, as well as showing the less-than-savory methods the FBI Counterintelligence people get up to.
* ''Series/{{Babylon}}'' had as one of its central plot threads the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by police officers. Rather awkwardly, shortly after the series started broadcasting in Britain (and shortly before its
Both American broadcast), this suddenly became a very, very, hot-button issue.
* ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'': The 2018 revival is being treated as this due to Roseanne (the star and her character) being a supporter of UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump and clashing with her liberal daughter and granddaughter. The situation got worse when Trump gave Roseanne Barr a congratulatory phone call her and proclaimed to his base that the show "belongs to us", as well as evidence of Barr promoting anti-liberal conspiracy theories and satirical photos of her dressed up as Adolf Hitler resurfaced. In social media circles, the show is being called a mainstream bullhorn for the Trump movement, and it's gotten to the point where just watching it (or not) is being considered
political act in parties, Democrat and of itself.Republican, see [[TheEmpire The Alliance]] in ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' as the other and the Browncoats as themselves. WordOfGod says that was an accident.



* ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'': The 2018 revival is being treated as this due to Roseanne (the star and her character) being a supporter of UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump and clashing with her liberal daughter and granddaughter. The situation got worse when Trump gave Roseanne Barr a congratulatory phone call her and proclaimed to his base that the show "belongs to us", as well as evidence of Barr promoting anti-liberal conspiracy theories and satirical photos of her dressed up as Adolf Hitler resurfaced. In social media circles, the show is being called a mainstream bullhorn for the Trump movement, and it's gotten to the point where just watching it (or not) is being considered political act in and of itself.
* [[http://www.slate.com/id/2177380/pagenum/all/ This Slate article]], which explains that Jerry Series/{{Seinfeld}} and his comedy routine represents conformity and lack of identity in a totalitarian government. Um... right.
** ''Slate'' (and to a lesser extent ''Salon'') absolutely loves this trope. Any even remotely popular pop culture phenomenon eventually becomes the victim of a pretentious, middlebrow ''Slate'' article that tries to analyze it and wring out some sort of important insight concerning our society. The [[JumpingTheShark nadir]] was probably [[http://www.slate.com/id/2111762/ this piece]], an earnest, serious 1,300-word examination of....UglyGuyHotWife.
*** [[http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2008/11/15/pathos_lolcats/ I can has pretenshis midulbrow analusis?]]
*** Heather Havrilesky, in her regular TV show review column for Salon.com, has a tendency to embrace this trope. Particularly when reviewing reality television, for some reason.
*** What is particularly funny about the ''Slate'' article is that UglyGuyHotWife is actually a trope that can be analyzed - it is part the basic OddCouple dynamic that provides comedy, and having one of them be ugly is a visual shorthand that enhance this. The reason the ugly one is male is because of society's traditional (and outdated) expectation that women should take pains to look nice. The article mentions precisely none of this (presumably because it is too ''bloody obvious''), instead attributing it to bizarre subconscious desires by men and women, and the whole thing ends being patronizing to both sexes.
* A book claimed that ''Series/StargateSG1'' was white supremacist propaganda.
** This claim may be inspired by the fact that the ''only'' religion of old (and by extension its "gods", i.e. the aliens standing in as these gods, or who inspired it) that is portrayed as good is Myth/NorseMythology. Said "gods" are a race of [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens Sufficiently Advanced]] [[TheGreys Grey Aliens]] called Asgard, who regularly help Earth (and the teams of the Stargate Command in particular, who earned their trust), while otherwise posing as benevolent gods to less advanced societies in the few times they show up on their planets. Basically any other religion that shows up is staffed by Goa'uld, who are always evil and incredibly selfish (there is one exception in Lord Yu, who never claimed to be a God, and who was the first Chinese Emperor).
** There is also an exception for the Abrahamic religions. Christianity gets directly mentioned exactly once in the series, and then in a (more or less) positive light. The TrueCompanions travel to a world where the people were culled from MiddleAges England. Daniel posits a theory (which turns out to be wrong) that the Goa'uld who controls this world may be posing as the {{God}} of the Abrahamic faiths. Teal'c dismisses this idea, stating that he's read Literature/TheBible and finds it impossible to imagine that any Goa'uld could be as benevolent as the deity from that book. Meanwhile the other two, Islam and Judaism, are never adressed at all. There ''is'' however a Goa'uld who poses as {{Satan}} and turned a planet/moon into hell just because he could.
** Others interpreted it as the final victory of science over religion, fought by heroic atheists and liberated ex-faithful against an amalgamation of the leaders of the world's faiths.
*** The series does make the point that gods aren't defined by their powers, but rather by their actions and benevolence. The Goa'uld and the Ori, who abuse their [[SufficientlyAdvancedAliens positions of privilege]] over their subjects, are not fit to act as gods over the people they rule. This was probably intentional, but considering Daniel's statements about fire being bad (the Ori use fire as a good symbolism, even choosing to appear as it instead of the default ascended light form) coming from the Ancients, it doesn't seem to mean they were against Christianity.
*** It's important to note that, while this is mostly in the background and not heavily discussed, the main characters themselves are shown as being on different wavelengths when it comes to religion. Jack O'Neill is snarkily irreverent and cynical towards religion in pretty much all its forms. Cam Mitchell tends to be positive about it, mostly through anecdotes about his very religious grandmother, but it's unclear whether or how much he himself believes the same things. Samantha Carter, in the face of her possible death, expressed the hope that after all of her work convincing enslaved people that they were following false gods, "somewhere one of those gods" was real. Her father, Jacob/Sel'mak, is openly a believer. The series supports religious tolerance (and the additional aesop that pretending to be a god in order to exploit people is bad), but it's hard to find a strong stance for or against religion per se. The series doesn't even condemn paganism, as it's never clear whether the Goa'uld created/inspired the ancient religions or simply decided to impersonate its deities (most clues given point at the former, though).
* The third season of ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' drew heavily on current events. Earth is savagely attacked, apparently out of nowhere, and the NX-01 (bringing along a cohort of SpaceMarines) heads into a treacherous region of space to find the culprits. Many fans were afraid this storyline would be untrue to ''Trek'''s philosophy, but they needn't have worried: the aliens aren't all bad (though there are a few problems - like that the most humanoid ones get a FaceHeelTurn but the [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent reptilian]] Xindi stay evil (although [[YouHaveFailedMe you wouldn't say no to]] [[BadBoss the head reptile, either]]) and the [[BigCreepyCrawlies insectoids]] [[strike: stay evil]] get cold feet while in transit to Earth and are blown up by the reptilians for their troubles), Archer's new hard-edged attitude isn't always endorsed, and there's enough ambiguity all round to keep it from being StrawmanPolitical in either direction.
** Prior to that, a couple of first-season episodes -- "Fortunate Son" and especially "Detained" -- examined elements of the war on terror. But contrary to a common assumption, the decision to name the first season's bad guys "Suliban" happened long before 9/11. They ''were'' named after the Taliban, but only because Rick Berman thought that name had the exotic sound he wanted; [[FunnyAneurysmMoment no one was expecting it to become a household name]].
* The children's television show ''Series/{{Teletubbies}}'' was accused of promoting the homosexual agenda to children.
** It was also (more than once) accused of promoting communism, conformity, lack of critical thinking and a "the state takes care of everything" mentality (or a "everything should be free" mentality). Proponents of this tend to point fingers at Social Justice Warriors, which fit the bill more often than not, but there's definitely more responsible under the surface than a TV show made for babies.
* A rather odd example is ''Series/ThatsMyBush''. Despite being created by Creator/TreyParkerAndMattStone and featuring the former President's administration and family as characters, it wasn't intended as political satire, but rather a parody of cookie cutter 80s sitcoms. (Parker and Stone admitted that, just in case things had gone the other way, they also had a pitch for a sitcom about Al Gore, and said they would have used more or less the same jokes no matter who'd actually won.)
* The Visitors in ''Series/{{V 2009}}'' have been interpreted as symbolizing UsefulNotes/BarackObama. This isn't helped by the fact that the show's plot (the alien Visitors, who receive the devotion of the people, are secretly plotting to destroy the world) bears a lot of similarities to various right-wing fears about Obama -- compare the Visitors' alien nature to the [[UsefulNotes/ConspiracyTheories "birther" conspiracy]]. Doesn't really help when the aliens provide "Universal Healthcare", and call it spreading hope... The writers have denied this, and claimed that the show is more about post-9/11 America than the current President.



[[folder: Troper works]]

to:

[[folder: Troper [[folder:Troper works]]


Relatedly, many critics hold a belief that '''every''' work is political, regardless of what the author intended; for instance, critics may feel that an author has particular moral or social obligations to challenge the "status quo" (or whatever the critic ''believes'' is the status quo).

to:

Relatedly, many critics hold a belief that '''every''' work is political, regardless of what the author intended; for instance, critics may feel that an author has particular moral or social obligations to challenge the "status quo" (or whatever the critic ''believes'' is the status quo).
quo). A related school of thought holds that, since the author is someone with opinions who exists in a political context, those opinions and context must necessarily shape their work in various ways with varying degrees of subtly and self-awareness. An attempt to be apolitical is a kind of political statement unto itself.


* The Music/{{Gorillaz}} song ''Fire Coming Out of the Monkey's Head'' from ''Music/DemonDays''. Listen to the lyrics, especially the closing lines.

Added DiffLines:

*The spanish song "La Cucaracha" acquired a lot of variations over the course of history, especially during the Mexican Revolution period. To the point where even one of the more common variations can refer to president Huerta's addiction.


** Ever since ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes1968'' hit theaters in 1968, people of all political tendencies have interpreted the franchise as a metaphor for black people rising and taking over white people ([[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and let's leave it at that]]). The movies' antinuclear, pacifist message is far more evident.

to:

** Ever since ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes1968'' hit theaters in 1968, people of all political tendencies have interpreted the franchise as a metaphor for black people rising and taking over white people ([[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement ([[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and let's leave it at that]]). The movies' antinuclear, pacifist message is far more evident.



* One for the industry as a whole: with the rise of indie gaming and a number of explicitly political games being released in recent years, there has been a trend ([[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement for good or for ill]]) for many to start seeing ''all'' games as having a political message (again, for good or for ill). The argument being that since a video game is the product of its time, it cannot help but reflect the political themes/beliefs/prejudices of the times. This has caused...tensions.

to:

* One for the industry as a whole: with the rise of indie gaming and a number of explicitly political games being released in recent years, there has been a trend ([[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement ([[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement for good or for ill]]) for many to start seeing ''all'' games as having a political message (again, for good or for ill). The argument being that since a video game is the product of its time, it cannot help but reflect the political themes/beliefs/prejudices of the times. This has caused...tensions.



* Website/{{Cracked}} explores this as it applies to [[http://www.cracked.com/article_19402_6-mind-blowing-ways-zombies-vampires-explain-america.html vampire and zombie stories in the US]]. Books/games/movies/etc. about [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] become more prevalent when a Democrat is President, and [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]] become more popular when a Republican holds office. The reasons for this [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment will not be discussed here]], but are discussed in great detail in the article.

to:

* Website/{{Cracked}} explores this as it applies to [[http://www.cracked.com/article_19402_6-mind-blowing-ways-zombies-vampires-explain-america.html vampire and zombie stories in the US]]. Books/games/movies/etc. about [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] become more prevalent when a Democrat is President, and [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]] become more popular when a Republican holds office. The reasons for this [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment will not be discussed here]], but are discussed in great detail in the article.



** The episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E1TheCutieMapPart1 "The Cutie Map"]], in which the villain rules over a {{dystopia}}n village of brainwashed ponies stripped of their individuality in the name of "equality", was welcomed enthusiastically by some right-wing and conservative viewers who interpreted it as a criticism of [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad political correctness]]. To the point where a certain far-right author, partly for trolling purposes, encouraged his blog's readers to vote the episode into that year's UsefulNotes/HugoAward as part of a campaign against the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment (alleged or not)]] left-wing bias of the awards.

to:

** The episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E1TheCutieMapPart1 "The Cutie Map"]], in which the villain rules over a {{dystopia}}n village of brainwashed ponies stripped of their individuality in the name of "equality", was welcomed enthusiastically by some right-wing and conservative viewers who interpreted it as a criticism of [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad political correctness]]. To the point where a certain far-right author, partly for trolling purposes, encouraged his blog's readers to vote the episode into that year's UsefulNotes/HugoAward as part of a campaign against the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment (alleged or not)]] left-wing bias of the awards.


* Creator/MarkMillar continues to insist that any political allegory in ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', a plot in which superheroes who didn't want to register with the government were rounded up and shipped off to what's come to be called "Space Guantanamo" by both fans and the ''Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics'', was completely accidental. A JustifiedTrope in this case, as Millar is ''British'' and likely didn't have quite as much context on American politics as others involved.

to:

* Creator/MarkMillar continues to insist that any political allegory in ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', a plot in which superheroes who didn't want to register with the government were rounded up and shipped off to what's come to be called "Space Guantanamo" by both fans and the ''Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics'', was completely accidental. A JustifiedTrope in this case, as Millar is ''British'' and likely didn't have quite as much context on American politics as others involved.


* Creator/MarkMillar continues to insist that any political allegory in ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', a plot in which superheroes who didn't want to register with the government were rounded up and shipped off to what's come to be called "Space Guantanamo" by both fans and the ''Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics'', was completely accidental.

to:

* Creator/MarkMillar continues to insist that any political allegory in ''Comicbook/CivilWar'', a plot in which superheroes who didn't want to register with the government were rounded up and shipped off to what's come to be called "Space Guantanamo" by both fans and the ''Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics'', was completely accidental. A JustifiedTrope in this case, as Millar is ''British'' and likely didn't have quite as much context on American politics as others involved.


* ''Manga/HighSchoolOfTheDead'': One of the most prominent examples would be Souichiro Takagi (father of Saya), who's a right wing ultra-nationalist who comes into conflict with some of the Straw Liberals [[ZombieAdvocate who still consider "them" to be human]]. The protagonists themselves are emphasized to be more individualistic based on the ensuing conflicts.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/DetroitBecomeHuman'': The game is clearly an allegory for civil rights and slavery with androids taking the place of blacks and other minorities, but David Cage has denied this. However, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwVERl0OYjc this video from Mother's Basement]] shows how this claim is incorrect, and just how bad this allegory is.


** Some have interpreted the ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' as an allegory for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, despite Tolkien's [[WordOfGod explicit denial]] that he was into allegory, stated dislike of the concept, irritation at speculation over the one Ring's "symbolism" and the fact the storyline was conceived, in part, from UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.

to:

** Some have interpreted the ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' as an allegory for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, despite Tolkien's [[WordOfGod explicit denial]] that he was into allegory, stated dislike of the concept, irritation at speculation over the one Ring's "symbolism" and the fact the storyline was conceived, in part, from UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.


* In the LP of [[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga Mario or Luigi Superstar Saga]] by LetsPlay/{{medibot}} and [=MyNameIsKaz=], Kaz's offhand comment on how much money Prince Peasly spends on the flashing light and sparkles that appear when he gestures leads to discussions on how the Bean-Bean Kingdom courts are despotic and tyrannical, embroiled deep in violations of Bean People rights and conspiracies involving the secret mining and production of a fuel reserve to secure their position of power amongst their neighbour states. [[https://youtu.be/hmiyQRCGmGU It has to be heard to be believed.]]

to:

* In the LP of [[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga Mario or Luigi Superstar Saga]] by LetsPlay/{{medibot}} and [=MyNameIsKaz=], Kaz's offhand comment on how much money Prince Peasly spends Peasley must spend on [[BishieSparkle the flashing light and sparkles that appear when he gestures gestures]] leads to discussions on how the Bean-Bean Kingdom courts are obviously despotic and tyrannical, and that they are embroiled deep in violations of Bean People rights and conspiracies involving the secret mining and production of a fuel reserve to secure their position of power amongst their neighbour states. [[https://youtu.be/hmiyQRCGmGU It has to be heard to be believed.]]


Relatedly, many critics hold a belief that '''every''' work is political, regardless of what the author intended; for instance, a work that lacks a certain level of racial or gender diversity may be seen as upholding the racial / gender status quo because most works of fiction in the Western world are rather lacking in that department, and since MostWritersAreMale (and White) they are culturally biased without being aware of it. In this view, the critic may feel that the author has particular moral or social obligations to portray particular types of people / events / places etc. in particular types of ways, since otherwise the work may be loaded with UnfortunateImplications.

to:

Relatedly, many critics hold a belief that '''every''' work is political, regardless of what the author intended; for instance, a work that lacks a certain level of racial or gender diversity may be seen as upholding the racial / gender status quo because most works of fiction in the Western world are rather lacking in that department, and since MostWritersAreMale (and White) they are culturally biased without being aware of it. In this view, the critic critics may feel that the an author has particular moral or social obligations to portray particular types of people / events / places etc. in particular types of ways, since otherwise challenge the work may be loaded with UnfortunateImplications.
"status quo" (or whatever the critic ''believes'' is the status quo).



* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': ''Asterix'' has also interpreted by xenophobes and racists as propaganda for an all white, all French, rural, traditionalist France that keeps foreign invaders out of the country. This claim is not in line with the creators. The series' writer Creator/ReneGoscinny was Jewish and survived World War Two, knowing firsthand what it feels like to be persecuted.

to:

* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': ''Asterix'' has also interpreted by xenophobes and racists as propaganda for an all white, all French, rural, traditionalist France that keeps foreign invaders out of the country. This claim is not in line with the creators. The series' writer Creator/ReneGoscinny was Jewish and survived World War Two, knowing Two- he knows firsthand what it feels like to be persecuted.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' is a fantasy series written for children. But the second arc is about Dragon Hitler convincing his impoverished brethren to wage war on a tundra-dwelling species comprised primarily of soldiers with aristocratic heritage, so one may be reminded of [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Nazi Germany fighting the USSR]].

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