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* In ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'', this is mostly avoided by the [=NPCs=], whose dialogue changes depending on the situation (i.e. getting higher standing in Cetus or Fortuna will trigger friendlier responses than when you first arrived). This is played entirely straight by [[spoiler:the Operators]] outside of cutscenes. They have a limited array of dialogue that plays randomly no matter what you're doing, leading to some awkward exchanges like "Phew, that was a close one." after you obliterate a room full of {{Mook}}s in a CurbStompBattle.

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* ''VideoGame/DivinityOriginalSin'': Most [=NPCs=] have a very short script of dialogue they will go through endlessly when not engaged in conversation by a player. Most egregious are the vendors in the Cyseal market who constantly bark about their goods, "Potions to bemuscle you! Scrolls to entussle you!" in an area the player will spend a lot of time in. Among them, the cheese vendor became an AscendedMeme with a quest in the sequel, ''Divinity Original Sin 2'' mockingly bringing back the speech of the Man of Many Cheeses in the mouth of a new character. Despite a patch being released to address the issue, it only added a slight delay between a character ending their lines and going back to repeating them again, very much allowing it to become the MostAnnoyingSound.
* ''VideoGame/DivinityOriginalSin2'': Although it's downplayed significantly compared to its predecessor game, characters still often go through loops of their outside-of-dialogue lines whenever not speaking to a PlayerCharacter. Most notably encountered in Driftwood, where various merchants cry out from their stall, similarly to Cyseal in ''Divinity Original Sin'' 1, the town crier who stands a few feet away from the merchants, endlessly informing you of the same bits of news over and over, and in the city of Arx which features many characters having incendental conversations while the player party wanders through the town.

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** Likewise in "Worse Case Scenario" which is based around a holodeck program simulating a [[TheMutiny Maquis mutiny]]. The program always starts with Chakotay approaching the player character in a corridor on the way to the turbolift and starting the same conversation.


* Creator/WorkingDesigns loved to parody[=/=][[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] this trope. Indeed, very few [=NPC=]s in their games didn't result in a decently complex dialogue between them and the main characters. The same sort of thing (minus the parody) could be found in the ''Franchise/{{Grandia}}'' series, made by Creator/GameArts, the same company responsible the ''Franchise/{{Lunar}}'' series that Working Designs is best known for. In both series, revisiting towns from earlier in the game will invariably result in new dialogue from the [=NPC=]s.

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* Creator/WorkingDesigns loved to parody[=/=][[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] this trope. Indeed, very few [=NPC=]s in their games didn't result in a decently complex dialogue between them and the main characters. The same sort of thing (minus the parody) could be found in the ''Franchise/{{Grandia}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Grandia}}'' series, made by Creator/GameArts, the same company responsible the ''Franchise/{{Lunar}}'' series that Working Designs is best known for. In both series, revisiting towns from earlier in the game will invariably result in new dialogue from the [=NPC=]s.


** In "Nemesis", Chakotay is shot down on a planet where [[HeroicArchetype handsome guerillas]] are fighting [[BeautyEqualsGoodness monstrous aliens]] who commit atrocities ForTheEvulz. He's taken to a village where a young girl greets Chakotay by placing a ring of flowers around his neck, and later decides to fight alongside the guerillas after seeing her and the other villagers dragged off to be executed. Turns out the whole scenario is designed to brainwash Chakotay and other conscripts into hating the enemy. Chakotay is taken back to the village at the end of the episode only to find it as good as new, and is shocked when the [[NotQuiteDead exact same girl]] greets him in the exact same manner.

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** In "Nemesis", Chakotay is shot down on a planet where [[HeroicArchetype handsome guerillas]] are fighting [[BeautyEqualsGoodness monstrous aliens]] who commit atrocities ForTheEvulz. He's taken to a village where a young girl greets Chakotay by placing a ring [[InnocentFlowerGirl garland of flowers flowers]] around his neck, and later decides to fight alongside the guerillas after seeing her and the other villagers dragged off to be executed. Turns out the whole scenario is designed to brainwash Chakotay and other conscripts into hating the enemy. Chakotay is taken back to the village at the end of the episode only to find it as good as new, and is shocked when the [[NotQuiteDead exact same girl]] greets him in the exact same manner.


* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. The episode "Heroes and Demons" mostly takes place in a holodeck program of ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}''. Each time a new crewman enters the program, the holodeck characters start with the same dialogue, even though their programming is sophisticated enough to hold a realistic conversation. The scriptwriters specifically used this trope to remind the audience of computer role-playing games.

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* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''
**
The episode "Heroes and Demons" mostly takes place in a holodeck program of ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}''. Each time a new crewman enters the program, the holodeck characters start with the same dialogue, even though their programming is sophisticated enough to hold a realistic conversation. The scriptwriters specifically used this trope to remind the audience of computer role-playing games.games.
** In "Nemesis", Chakotay is shot down on a planet where [[HeroicArchetype handsome guerillas]] are fighting [[BeautyEqualsGoodness monstrous aliens]] who commit atrocities ForTheEvulz. He's taken to a village where a young girl greets Chakotay by placing a ring of flowers around his neck, and later decides to fight alongside the guerillas after seeing her and the other villagers dragged off to be executed. Turns out the whole scenario is designed to brainwash Chakotay and other conscripts into hating the enemy. Chakotay is taken back to the village at the end of the episode only to find it as good as new, and is shocked when the [[NotQuiteDead exact same girl]] greets him in the exact same manner.


* In ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'', Qlon is one of the 108 Stars of Destiny, but in terms of gameplay he serves no practical purpose whatsoever. He can't be in your party and he doesn't make any additions to your castle. All he does is state the name of your castle, saying "This is [insert name of castle], I feel so good."
* In ''VideoGame/{{The Witcher 3}}'', most generic [=NPCs=] have 2 lines that they repeat when you interact, sometimes if you just come close enough they speak. Sometimes these lines are sentences, single words ("Hm? Yeah? Hm? Yeah?"), grunts, or other sounds (coughing seems to be a common one in the poorer and dirtier areas)

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'', Qlon is one of the 108 Stars of Destiny, but in terms of gameplay he serves no practical purpose whatsoever. He can't be in your party and he doesn't make any additions to your castle. All he does is state the name of your castle, saying "This is [insert name of castle], I feel so good."
* In ''VideoGame/{{The Witcher 3}}'',
''VideoGame/TheWitcher3'', most generic [=NPCs=] have 2 lines that they repeat when you interact, sometimes if you just come close enough they speak. Sometimes these lines are sentences, single words ("Hm? Yeah? Hm? Yeah?"), grunts, or other sounds (coughing seems to be a common one in the poorer and dirtier areas)


* Played with in ''VideoGame/MillenniaAlteredDestinies''. When contacting one of your agents among the four races, they will either hold the same exact conversation with you each time you call them in that time period, or will remember that you've already called them before, depending on how the event is scripted. While this can be attributed to TimeTravel, this happens even if you haven't performed a time jump between conversations.



* Played with in ''VideoGame/MillenniaAlteredDestinies''. When contacting one of your agents among the four races, they will either hold the same exact conversation with you each time you call them in that time period, or will remember that you've already called them before, depending on how the event is scripted. While this can be attributed to TimeTravel, this happens even if you haven't performed a time jump between conversations.

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* Played with in ''VideoGame/MillenniaAlteredDestinies''. When contacting one of your agents among the four races, they will either hold the same exact conversation with you each time you call them in that time period, or will remember that you've already called them before, depending on how the event is scripted. While this can be attributed to TimeTravel, this happens even if you haven't performed a time jump between conversations.

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* In the ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' episode "Inmate 4587", Oliver wakes up every morning in his cell to the same guard saying "Morning, 4587. Beautiful day."


* In the fourth ''Literature/{{Magic 2.0}}'' book, the characters trapped in Todd's game are forced to deal with this, when encountering certain [=NPCs=]. The first time is a wizard, who keeps repeating the "call for adventure" half a dozen times until they say the right words. Other times, they deal with poorly-written scripted [=NPCs=], who respond to questions with completely unrelated answers (apparently, Todd expected them to ask different questions).

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* In the fourth ''Literature/{{Magic ''[[Literature/{{Magic20}} Magic 2.0}}'' 0]]'' book, the characters trapped in Todd's game are forced to deal with this, when encountering certain [=NPCs=]. The first time is a wizard, who keeps repeating the "call for adventure" half a dozen times until they say the right words. Other times, they deal with poorly-written scripted [=NPCs=], who respond to questions with completely unrelated answers (apparently, Todd expected them to ask different questions).

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* In the fourth ''Literature/{{Magic 2.0}}'' book, the characters trapped in Todd's game are forced to deal with this, when encountering certain [=NPCs=]. The first time is a wizard, who keeps repeating the "call for adventure" half a dozen times until they say the right words. Other times, they deal with poorly-written scripted [=NPCs=], who respond to questions with completely unrelated answers (apparently, Todd expected them to ask different questions).


* ''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout1}} Fallout]]'' has this as much as any RPG with dozens of nameless non-player characters in every town, but it's subtly lampshaded out of context when you get to the [[SuperVillainLair Cathedral]]. After you speak to one of the Children once or twice, a possible conversation starter is "You know, every time I talk to someone, people keep repeating everything they say over and over again."
* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has Three Dog and President Eden of Galaxy News Radio and Enclave Radio, respectively. Since most players have their radio on most of the time - if not all of it - the banter given by these two tends to get really repetitive. Three Dog comments on in-game events, although the changes in his monologues can be pretty far-between. Of note, however, Three Dog does make mention that he's pre-taping his segments, which is how he can talk to you while the station is broadcasting him talking about current events.
** Megaton's residents disguise their lack of dialogue by being standoffish and telling you they don't want to chat. With the same few lines, of course, but it's a neat effort.
* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' has the NCR troopers saying [[MemeticMutation "Patrolling the Mojave almost makes you wish for a nuclear winter."]] very, very often.
** "When I got this assignment I was hoping there would be more gambling."
** "We've got stuff we're not even allowed to sell, people! [[MostAnnoyingSound Only at Mick and Ralph's!]]"
*** Of course, that one ''is'' justified: it's low-tech advertising (paying someone to stand on the main street, where plenty of people with caps passes through, and shout store slogans), not actual ''dialogue''. TruthInTelevision to boot, as that's how advertising was done prior to the invention of radio.
** On good terms with the Legion? Expect every Legionnaire you encounter to greet you with "Ave. True to Caesar."
** "NCR officials at Camp [=McCarran=] were relieved when technical difficulties with its monorail line to the New Vegas Strip proved easy to fix. One anonymous official told us a serious mechanical failure would have been a disaster because of the age of the train and the scarcity of the replacement parts."
** Primm apparently demands that its sheriff will swear in every other day.
** Unusually, generic [=NPC=]s will often have the same line read by several different voice actors.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has Three Dog and President Eden of Galaxy News Radio and Enclave Radio, respectively. Since most players have their radio on most of the time - if not all of it - the banter given by these two tends to get really repetitive. Three Dog comments on in-game events, although the changes in his monologues can be pretty far-between. Of note, however, Three Dog does make mention that he's pre-taping his segments, which is how he can talk to you while the station is broadcasting him talking about current events.
** Megaton's residents disguise their lack of dialogue by being standoffish and telling you they don't want to chat. With the same few lines, of course, but it's a neat effort.
* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' has the NCR troopers saying "Patrolling the Mojave almost makes you wish for a nuclear winter" very, very often.
** "When I got this assignment I was hoping there would be more gambling."
** "We've got stuff we're not even allowed to sell, people! [[MostAnnoyingSound Only at Mick and Ralph's!]]"
*** Of course, that one ''is'' justified: it's low-tech advertising (paying someone to stand on the main street, where plenty of people with caps passes through, and shout store slogans), not actual ''dialogue''. TruthInTelevision to boot, as that's how advertising was done prior to the invention of radio.
** On good terms with the Legion? Expect every Legionnaire you encounter to greet you with "Ave. True to Caesar."
** "NCR officials at Camp [=McCarran=] were relieved when technical difficulties with its monorail line to the New Vegas Strip proved easy to fix. One anonymous official told us a serious mechanical failure would have been a disaster because of the age of the train and the scarcity of the replacement parts."
** Primm apparently demands that its sheriff will swear in every other day.
** Unusually, generic [=NPC=]s will often have the same line read by several different voice actors.



* ''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout1}} Fallout]]'' has this as much as any RPG with dozens of nameless non-player characters in every town, but it's subtly lampshaded out of context when you get to the [[SuperVillainLair Cathedral]]. After you speak to one of the Children once or twice, a possible conversation starter is "You know, every time I talk to someone, people keep repeating everything they say over and over again."


* Lampshaded in the Creator/ProZD scetch [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=688z-4SWxOQ "when a game has only one voiceover line for a specific action"]], in which swordfighter Archibald's quote for a thrust is "Hyah! I think that enemy got...the point!"

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* Lampshaded in the Creator/ProZD scetch sketch [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=688z-4SWxOQ "when a game has only one voiceover line for a specific action"]], in which swordfighter Archibald's quote for a thrust is "Hyah! I think that enemy got...the point!"

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