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* Often used in ''SpiderMan'' games.

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* Often used in ''SpiderMan'' ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' games.


* Frequently used by the Literature/{{Culture}}, who have sufficient computing power to create indistinguishable-from reality VR on a whim, and who like to be very prepared before they enter a situation. Gets bizarre in ''Literature/SurfaceDetail'', where we're told the combatants in the War in Heaven use simulations to prepare for "real" battles ''which are themselves taking place in VR''.

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* Frequently used by the Literature/{{Culture}}, Literature/TheCulture, who have sufficient computing power to create indistinguishable-from reality VR on a whim, and who like to be very prepared before they enter a situation. Gets bizarre in ''Literature/SurfaceDetail'', where we're told the combatants in the War in Heaven use simulations to prepare for "real" battles ''which are themselves taking place in VR''.

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* Frequently used by the Literature/{{Culture}}, who have sufficient computing power to create indistinguishable-from reality VR on a whim, and who like to be very prepared before they enter a situation. Gets bizarre in ''Literature/SurfaceDetail'', where we're told the combatants in the War in Heaven use simulations to prepare for "real" battles ''which are themselves taking place in VR''.

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* ''Film/AmericanAssassin'' features the VR goggles version (with the trainees actually moving around in a large gymnasium-like space), complete with electric shocks for shooting non-combatants (and a bigger shock for letting yourself get shot by a simulated "terrorist").


* The heroes of ''FanFic/TheMotleyTwo'' participate in one of these as part of army training, and those who do badly face demotion. It's sort of patterned after typical CompetitiveMultiplayer {{First Person Shooter}}s, with two teams against each other; one of the "game modes" is an "escort the VIP" objective, while in another an outnumbered team defends themselves until they can use an airstrike.

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* The heroes of ''FanFic/TheMotleyTwo'' ''Webcomic/TheMotleyTwo'' participate in one of these as part of army training, and those who do badly face demotion. It's sort of patterned after typical CompetitiveMultiplayer {{First Person Shooter}}s, with two teams against each other; one of the "game modes" is an "escort the VIP" objective, while in another an outnumbered team defends themselves until they can use an airstrike.


* ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest V: The Next Mutation'', being a parody of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', starts with [[AlmightyJanitor Roger]] in a [[UnwinnableTrainingSimulation Kobayashi Maru]]-like simulation in the [[TheFederation StarCon]] Academy before beind discovered by [[JerkAss Captain Raems T. Quirk]] and kicked out. Unlike the Trek version, though, this is a one-man simulation.
** In ''Space Quest 6: The Spinal Frontier'', Roger uses a [[HardLight holo-cabana]] onboard the [=SCS=] ''[=DeepShip=] 86'' to load a training program for the Vulgar nerve pinch.
* The tutorial levels for the second ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' are this, taking place in {{Cyberspace}}.

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* ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest V: The Next Mutation'', ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest''
** ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestVTheNextMutation'',
being a parody of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', starts with [[AlmightyJanitor Roger]] in a [[UnwinnableTrainingSimulation Kobayashi Maru]]-like simulation in the [[TheFederation StarCon]] Academy before beind discovered by [[JerkAss Captain Raems T. Quirk]] and kicked out. Unlike the Trek version, though, this is a one-man simulation.
** In ''Space Quest 6: The Spinal Frontier'', ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestVIRogerWilcoInTheSpinalFrontier'', Roger uses a [[HardLight holo-cabana]] onboard the [=SCS=] ''[=DeepShip=] 86'' to load a training program for the Vulgar nerve pinch.
* The tutorial levels for the second ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' are this, taking ''VideoGame/SystemShock2'' take place in {{Cyberspace}}.


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* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' DLC ''Pinnacle Station'' features the eponymous space station which uses holograms to simulate combat scenarios, both for training and competition. Normally these simulations are harmless, but if you can beat the records in all scenarios, Captain Ahern will offer you a scenario in which you ''can'' get killed.
* In ''VideoGame/CosmicStarHeroine'', once you clear the area of enemies, you can choose "Battle" from pause menu to engage in a virtual recreation of one of the battles from the area, allowing for LevelGrinding in a game with no RespawningEnemies.

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* During Issue #8 of ''VideoGame/TheSecretWorld'', players discover that the [[FictionalUnitedNations Council of Venice]]'s headquarters at the [[ElaborateUndergroundBase Sunken Library]] is in possession of an unimaginably powerful virtual reality machine. As it so happens, this machine is primarily used for training purposes, and players are charged with completing several training sessions in order to earn proper certification to enter [[WhereItAllBegan Tokyo]] in the following issue.


May get dangerous if a HolodeckMalfunction occurs. If it is dangerous or becomes so on a regular basis, it is also a DeadlyTrainingArea. Can be used for a DangerRoomColdOpen or an UnwinnableTrainingSimulation. See also {{Cyberspace}}.

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May get dangerous if a HolodeckMalfunction occurs. If it is dangerous or becomes so on a regular basis, it is also a DeadlyTrainingArea. Can be used for a DangerRoomColdOpen or an UnwinnableTrainingSimulation. See also {{Cyberspace}}.
{{Cyberspace}} and TrainingStage.


* It's part of the {{backstory}} of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn'' game that you're a "telegeneral" leading your troops from a computer screen, as if you're playing a RealTimeStrategy game, and thet you were first flagged as potential command talent because the GDI and NOD are monitoring online strategy games for that reason.

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* It's part of the {{backstory}} of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn'' game that you're a "telegeneral" leading your troops from a computer screen, as if you're playing a RealTimeStrategy game, and thet you were first flagged as potential command talent because the GDI and NOD Nod are monitoring online strategy games for that reason.

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* The ''WesternAnimation/DangerMouse'' relaunch episode "Megahurtz Attacks" has a DangerRoomColdOpen with Penfold taking a training simulation to become a Danger Agent (Grade 2). Because of RuleOfFunny, the simulation works like a video game, with inventory puzzles and enemies turning into giant coins when defeated. The eponymous Megahurtz is the FinalBoss, who escapes into the real world and causes havoc, continuing to run on video game logic.


* The "Danger Room" of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} was originally basically just an obstacle course, but in the later issues it was rebuilt into one of these, using holographic technology.

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* The "Danger Room" of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} ComicBook/XMen was originally basically just an obstacle course, but in the later issues it was rebuilt into one of these, using holographic technology.

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* The tutorial levels for the second ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' are this, taking place in {{Cyberspace}}.


* The "Danger Room" of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} was originally basically just an obstacle course, but in the later issues it was rebuilt into using holographic technology.
* In ''ComicBook/{{Pouvoirpoint}}'', because of the growing threat of proximian attack, the crew of starship Entreprise-2061 has to follow a self-defense training in the gym room, as a [[CaptureTheFlag Capture the flag]] game set in a [[ArtificialOutdoorsDisplay virtual jungle]]. Players wear big VR glasses and use Amiga joysticks.

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* The "Danger Room" of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} was originally basically just an obstacle course, but in the later issues it was rebuilt into one of these, using holographic technology.
* In ''ComicBook/{{Pouvoirpoint}}'', because of the growing threat of proximian Proximian attack, the crew of starship Entreprise-2061 has to follow a carry out self-defense training in the gym room, as in the form of a [[CaptureTheFlag Capture the flag]] Flag]] game set in a [[ArtificialOutdoorsDisplay virtual jungle]]. Players wear big VR glasses and use Amiga joysticks.



* The home computer versions of ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'' seems to follow the official story. However, completing the fifth stage (by destroying Mecha Pon) reveals that Strider was performing a simulation in preparation for the actual battle, and that his skills will become handy when the real invasion starts. The ending also recycles images, implying that the villians General Mikiel and Tong Pooh were praising Strider for completing the simulation.

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* The home computer versions of ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'' seems to follow the official story. However, completing the fifth stage (by destroying Mecha Pon) reveals that Strider was performing a simulation in preparation for the actual battle, and that his skills will become handy when the real invasion starts. The ending also recycles images, implying that the villians villains General Mikiel and Tong Pooh were praising Strider for completing the simulation.

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* ''VideoGame/JudgeDreddDreddVsDeath'': A variation in the tutorial level--the training area itself is real, but the perps and hostages are all holograms.


** The "''Redemption'' Scenario" in the ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' is used as the final exam to enter Rogue Squadron. In a MythologyGag, Mike Stackpole based it on an [[ThatOneLevel infamous level]] in the ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' N64 game.

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** The "''Redemption'' Scenario" in the ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' is used as the final exam to enter Rogue Squadron. In a MythologyGag, Mike Stackpole based it on an [[ThatOneLevel infamous level]] in the ''VideoGame/RogueSquadron'' N64 ''VideoGame/XWing'' PC game.

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