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* Averted for the most part in the grand strategy games by ''Creator/ParadoxInteractive'' as most actions and events play out in a realistic time frame, with one notable exception: Individual battles between armies can last days, months, or in extreme cases even ''years'', all the while the world continues to turn around them. This means there's often enough time for one army to march halfway across a country to reinforce their comrades who engaged an enemy in battle several weeks prior and are still in the thick of it.


* The years pass by in a strange way in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'': In the beginning, a turn ranges from 50 years to a couple of centuries, depending on the game speed, but in later eras, less years go by per turn until one turn = one year. This would mean that it would take ''years'' for a unit to cross several spaces, whereas it would probably only take several days or maybe months. The "slowing down" effect over the course of the game corresponds to the idea that units can move faster as technology improves (independent of infrastructure upgrades which let units move more spaces per turn). Battles are where this trope kicks in full gear, as they last several of these turns. At the end of each turn, a forest could (by chance) appear in a square that troops are defending in, giving them an unexpected defensive bonus mid-battle.

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* The years pass by in a strange way in ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'': In the beginning, a turn ranges from 50 years to a couple of centuries, depending on the game speed, but in later eras, less years go by per turn until one turn = one year. This would mean that it would take ''years'' for a unit to cross several spaces, whereas it would probably only take several days or maybe months. The "slowing down" effect over the course of the game corresponds to the idea that units can move faster as technology improves (independent of infrastructure upgrades which let units move more spaces per turn). Battles are where this trope kicks in full gear, as they last several of these turns. At the end of each turn, a forest could (by chance) appear in a square that troops are defending in, giving them an unexpected defensive bonus mid-battle. One can only wonder if these "battles" actually represent decade-long conflicts, which would make a ten-turn campaign in the Ancient Era into a ForeverWar that lasts the better part of the millennium.


* In the ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' series, [[InUniverseGameClock One real life second is equal to one in game minute]], making time management important.

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* In the ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' series, [[InUniverseGameClock One one real life second is equal to one in game minute]], making time management important.important. However, time doesn't pass during most menu-related features, which results in oddities like cooking food to cause no time to pass. In addition, the four seasons last around thirty days each. This results in years that last around 120 in-game days. This is taken even further in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'', where seasons are ten days long resulting in 40-day years.



* The ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' series ignores months, instead having the four seasons last around thirty days each. This results in years that last around 120 in-game days. This is taken even further in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'', where seasons are ten days long resulting in 40-day years.

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* The ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' series ignores months, instead having the four seasons last around thirty days each. This results in years that last around 120 in-game days. This is taken even further in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'', where seasons are ten days long resulting in 40-day years.


* The ''Franchise/JakAndDaxter'' games have this to some extent with how quickly the day/night cycle takes to execute; a clock in the Hip Hog Heaven Saloon reveals that one minute in the game world is one second in ours. Despite this, characters still refer to our timescales for missions that have time limits, such as two minutes for the Strip Mine Eco Bomb mission. This is even Lampshaded in the second game:
--> '''Krew''': Now get out! I need my beauty nap!
--> '''Daxter''': Trust me brother, there aren't enough hours in the day!

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* The ''Franchise/JakAndDaxter'' ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'' games have this to some extent with how quickly the day/night cycle takes to execute; a clock in the Hip Hog Heaven Saloon reveals that one minute in the game world is one second in ours. Despite this, characters still refer to our timescales for missions that have time limits, such as two minutes for the Strip Mine Eco Bomb mission. This is even Lampshaded in the second game:
--> '''Krew''': Now get out! I need my beauty nap!
-->
nap!\\
'''Daxter''': Trust me brother, there aren't enough hours in the day!


* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' fits this to a T, at least in Fortress Mode. Dwarves work for months at a time and then sleep for weeks, and it can take a year for them simply to haul a few dozen things from one end of the fort to another. There has been some interest from the creator in finding some way to balance this later and improve the level of detail, but that's far in the future. Adventure Mode averts this, however, as time moves quite slowly, and traveling and sleeping take appropriate amounts of time.

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* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' fits this to a T, at least in Fortress Mode. Dwarves work for months at a time and then sleep for weeks, and it can take a year for them simply to haul a few dozen things from one end of the fort to another. There has been some interest from the creator in finding some way to balance this later and improve the level of detail, but that's far in the future. Adventure Mode averts this, however, as time moves quite slowly, and traveling travelling and sleeping take appropriate amounts of time.


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* ''VideoGame/TwoPointHospital'', spiritual successor to ''VideoGame/ThemeHospital'', has days passing in a matter of seconds. It can take patients a month just to find the entrance to the hospital and they can survive a year or more with no food or toilets, but it's possible to build entire buildings in just a couple of weeks, while rooms full of technical equipment can be built instantly. In fact, rooms can be built so quickly that anyone in the area when it happens gets [[PlayedForLaughs catapulted out of the way]].


'''Note: ''' This trope does not involve times [[{{Pun}} (heh)]] where days in the game equate to only minutes in real life. YearInsideHourOutside is what you're looking at.



* A day in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' is only 48 minutes long. This was presumably done to ensure they player would get to see all the neat weather effects.



* In ''VideoGame/TopShop'', each round represents an entire month, despite the actual rounds only taking a minute or so.
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' tasks you with saving the world from a falling moon that will make impact within 72 hours, which is roughly 54 minutes in real time. You'll be traveling back in time to the first day over and over in order to retry and be able to progress in other areas once you get the appropriate items. There's also a song in game you can play that will slow down the flow of time, allowing you to play for about an hour and a half before you have to go back in time to restart.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'' has had an in-game clock and calendar running since its servers first went online. It doesn't do anything remarkably odd with this trope, but the real kicker to it is that it continues to track the in-game year. Literally thousands of years have passed in-game, but no [=PC=] or [=NPC=] has ever aged, no construction project has ever been completed, no city or civilization has ever changed risen or fallen. It's a stagnant world but time continues to flow.



* ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' is an interesting case. Thanks to an update to the game, players are able to change the time of day settings to whatever they want. You can choose from a 24 minute day cycle,[[note]]one real life minute equals one in-game hour and one real life second equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 48 minute day cycle,[[note]]two real life minutes equals one in-game hour, one real life minute equals an in-game half-hour, and two real life seconds equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 2 hour day cycle,[[note]]Five real life minutes (or seconds) equals one in-game hour (or minutes) and one real life minute equals twelve in-game minutes[[/note]] a 24 hour cycle,[[note]]1:1 time between reality and the game[[/note]] match local time,[[note]]same as the 24 hour cycle, but the time in Paradise City is the time as set on your console or computer[[/note]] or set the time to always be midday (12:00 PM), sunset (8:00 PM), midnight (12:00 AM), or sunrise (6:00 AM).


Compare to ComicBookTime. That page deals with the problem of having long series with hundreds of issues lasting for decades but having no accurate reflection of the change for the characters. Essentially it is a conflict between the work and real life with inconsistencies creeping into the work when they try to update it piecemeal.

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Compare to ComicBookTime. That page deals with the problem of having long series with hundreds of issues lasting for decades but having no accurate reflection of the change for the characters. Essentially it is a conflict between the work and real life with inconsistencies creeping into the work when they try to update it piecemeal.
piecemeal. See also NarniaTime, when timescales of two different locations/settings seem to have no correlation - 1 minute can equate to an hour, or a week, or 5 seconds.


Supertrope of RidiculouslyFastConstruction. In RTS games specifically, this would clearly be related to UnitsNotToScale and Distances Not To Scale -- here time isn't, either. May overlap with InUniverseGameClock.

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Supertrope of RidiculouslyFastConstruction. In RTS games specifically, this would clearly be related to UnitsNotToScale and Distances Not To Scale -- here time isn't, either. May overlap with InUniverseGameClock.
InUniverseGameClock. Typically, this trope [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality has come to be expected since it allows the player to advance the game on their own time.]]


* ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' is an interesting case. Thanks to an update to the game, players are able to change the time of day settings to whatever they want. You can choose from a 24 minute day cycle,[[note]]one real life minute equals one in-game hour and one real life second equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 48 minute day cycle,[[note]]two real life minutes equals one in-game hour, one real life minute equals an in-game half-hour, and two real life seconds equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 2 hour day cycle,[[note]]Five real life minutes (or seconds) equals one in-game hour (or minutes) and one real life minute equals twelve in-game minutes[[/note]] a 24 hour cycle,[[note]]1:1 time between reality and the game[[/note]] match local time,[[note]]same as the 24 hour cycle, but the time in Paradise City is the time as set on your console or computer[[/note]], or set the time to always be midday (12:00 PM), sunset (8:00 PM), midnight (12:00 AM), or sunrise (6:00 AM).

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* ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' is an interesting case. Thanks to an update to the game, players are able to change the time of day settings to whatever they want. You can choose from a 24 minute day cycle,[[note]]one real life minute equals one in-game hour and one real life second equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 48 minute day cycle,[[note]]two real life minutes equals one in-game hour, one real life minute equals an in-game half-hour, and two real life seconds equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 2 hour day cycle,[[note]]Five real life minutes (or seconds) equals one in-game hour (or minutes) and one real life minute equals twelve in-game minutes[[/note]] a 24 hour cycle,[[note]]1:1 time between reality and the game[[/note]] match local time,[[note]]same as the 24 hour cycle, but the time in Paradise City is the time as set on your console or computer[[/note]], computer[[/note]] or set the time to always be midday (12:00 PM), sunset (8:00 PM), midnight (12:00 AM), or sunrise (6:00 AM).

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* ''VideoGame/BurnoutParadise'' is an interesting case. Thanks to an update to the game, players are able to change the time of day settings to whatever they want. You can choose from a 24 minute day cycle,[[note]]one real life minute equals one in-game hour and one real life second equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 48 minute day cycle,[[note]]two real life minutes equals one in-game hour, one real life minute equals an in-game half-hour, and two real life seconds equals one in-game minute[[/note]] a 2 hour day cycle,[[note]]Five real life minutes (or seconds) equals one in-game hour (or minutes) and one real life minute equals twelve in-game minutes[[/note]] a 24 hour cycle,[[note]]1:1 time between reality and the game[[/note]] match local time,[[note]]same as the 24 hour cycle, but the time in Paradise City is the time as set on your console or computer[[/note]], or set the time to always be midday (12:00 PM), sunset (8:00 PM), midnight (12:00 AM), or sunrise (6:00 AM).


* The instruction manual for ''RailroadTycoon 2'' lampshades this by saying that sure, it may seem unrealistic to only deliver two loads of cargo a year, but at least you won't be staring at your computer screen for half a day when one of the trains breaks down.

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* The instruction manual for ''RailroadTycoon ''VideoGame/RailroadTycoon 2'' lampshades this by saying that sure, it may seem unrealistic to only deliver two loads of cargo a year, but at least you won't be staring at your computer screen for half a day when one of the trains breaks down.


* In the ''Franchise/HarvestMoon'' series, [[InUniverseGameClock One real life second is equal to one in game minute]], making time management important.

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* In the ''Franchise/HarvestMoon'' ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' series, [[InUniverseGameClock One real life second is equal to one in game minute]], making time management important.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'' has had an in-game clock and calendar running since its servers first went online. It doesn't do anything remarkably odd with this trope, but the real kicker to it is that it continues to track the in-game year. Literally thousands of years have passed in-game, but no [=PC=] or [=NPC=] has ever aged, no construction project has ever been completed, no city or civilization has ever changed risen or fallen. It's a stagnant world but time continues to flow.

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