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** In third edition DnD, (and, by extension ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'') most DMs just have monsters and npcs die when they reach 0 hp or lower rather than tracking their hp (the rules official state that characters don't die till they reach -10 hp or the negative of whatever their constitution score is in Pathfinder), mainly because it is both a hassle and creates some moral quandaries, as killing an opponent who is already unconscious and bleeding to death doesn't seem very heroic. The big exception being monsters in Pathfinder with the Ferocity ability (which lets them [[TheDeterminator remain conscious and keep fighting till they are reduced to negative con hp]]). Oddly enough, Pathfinder second edition (which, like DND fifth edition, removes negative hp and just has a character fall unconscious and have to make saving throws to avoid dying) explicitly says that monsters and NPCs should just die when brought to 0 hp, unless it was due to a non-lethal attack.


* The balk rule. Balks are simple to explain, but hard to actually call. A pitcher balks when he makes a motion that deceives a base runner. A pitcher can't act like he's throwing a pitch and then throw to first base to pick off a runner, which is why when trying to pick off a runner, the pitcher will almost always move their front leg towards the base. Balks can also be called when a pitcher also motions toward one base but throws to a different one. The problem is, how do you classify a "motion"? Is it when the pitcher starts his windup? When he lifts his leg? When he moves his arm? There's also the issue of what counts as "towards" a base- if a pitcher starts moving in a direction between home plate and first base, for instance, which base is he throwing to? Balks are almost always controversial at the Major League level as they are the third-most common cause of ejections after balls/strikes and checked swing calls. Balks can also be called for similarly deceptive moves by the catcher. And there's some other things that count as balks, too- it's also a balk if the pitcher motions towards a base like he's going to throw but doesn't throw, if he starts making a throw without first fully coming to a "set" position, if he throws to home plate while his foot isn't on the pitching rubber, or, well, a lot of other things. There's even a few ways to balk that are clearly completely unintentional, like tripping and falling off the mound or dropping the ball.


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* The balk rule. Balks are simple to explain, but hard to actually call. A pitcher balks when he makes a motion that deceives a base runner. A pitcher can't act like he's throwing a pitch and then throw to first base to pick off a runner, which is why when trying to pick off a runner, the pitcher will almost always move their front leg towards the base. Balks can also be called when a pitcher also motions toward one base but throws to a different one. The problem is, how do you classify a "motion"? Is it when the pitcher starts his windup? When he lifts his leg? When he moves his arm? There's also the issue of what counts as "towards" a base- if a pitcher starts moving in a direction between home plate and first base, for instance, which base is he throwing to? Balks are almost always controversial at the Major League level as they are the third-most common cause of ejections after balls/strikes and checked swing calls. Balks can also be called for similarly deceptive moves by the catcher. And there's some other things that count as balks, too- it's also a balk if the pitcher motions towards a base like he's going to throw but doesn't throw, if he starts making a throw without first fully coming to a "set" position, if he throws to home plate while his foot isn't on the pitching rubber, or, well, a lot of other things. There's even a few ways to balk that are clearly completely unintentional, like tripping and falling off the mound or dropping the ball.



* The balk rule. Balks are simple to explain, but hard to actually call. A pitcher has balked when he makes a motion towards a base, but throws to a different base. So a pitcher can't act like he's throwing a pitch and then throw to first base to pick off a runner, which is why when trying to pick off a runner, the pitcher will almost always move their front leg towards the base. The problem is, how do you classify a "motion"? Is it when the pitcher starts his windup? When he lifts his leg? When he moves his arm? There's also the issue of what counts as "towards" a base- if a pitcher starts moving in a direction between home plate and first base, for instance, which base is he throwing to? Balks are almost always controversial at the Major League level. Balks can also be called for similarly deceptive moves by the catcher. And there's some other things that count as balks, too- it's also a balk if the pitcher motions towards a base like he's going to throw but doesn't throw, if he starts making a throw without first fully coming to a "set" position, if he throws to home plate while his foot isn't on the pitching rubber, or, well, a lot of other things. There's even a few ways to balk that are clearly completely unintentional, like tripping and falling off the mound or dropping the ball.


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* The balk rule. Balks are simple to explain, but hard to actually call. A pitcher has balked balks when he makes a motion towards that deceives a base, but throws to a different base. So a base runner. A pitcher can't act like he's throwing a pitch and then throw to first base to pick off a runner, which is why when trying to pick off a runner, the pitcher will almost always move their front leg towards the base. Balks can also be called when a pitcher also motions toward one base but throws to a different one. The problem is, how do you classify a "motion"? Is it when the pitcher starts his windup? When he lifts his leg? When he moves his arm? There's also the issue of what counts as "towards" a base- if a pitcher starts moving in a direction between home plate and first base, for instance, which base is he throwing to? Balks are almost always controversial at the Major League level.level as they are the third-most common cause of ejections after balls/strikes and checked swing calls. Balks can also be called for similarly deceptive moves by the catcher. And there's some other things that count as balks, too- it's also a balk if the pitcher motions towards a base like he's going to throw but doesn't throw, if he starts making a throw without first fully coming to a "set" position, if he throws to home plate while his foot isn't on the pitching rubber, or, well, a lot of other things. There's even a few ways to balk that are clearly completely unintentional, like tripping and falling off the mound or dropping the ball.


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** Mystical Refpanel. Its effect: it can change the target of a card that targets one player to the other. Figuring out what this means will likely require another trip to the wiki. Short version: anything that draws, discards from the hand, changes your LP, or limits your actions, and that only affects one player, and that isn't an Equip, Continuous, or Field Spell, and it only transfers effect, not cost, condition, or whoever used it... You can generally tell a card falls into this when it doesn't see a rerelease, and Refpanel hasn't been reissued in the OCG for ''seventeen years'' as of this writing, despite its fairly pivotal anime appearances.


** Targeting rules are tricky, particularly because of how the game's effect resolution work. When Summons or Abilities are used, targets must be valid prior to the effect even being paid for, otherwise the play is not legal. Comes-into-play effects however differ because those effects don't occur until ''after'' they're paid for. For example, Lenna has two effects: when she comes into play, you can choose a Forward of cost 2 or less in your Break Zone and put it into play for free. She also has an effect that lets you choose a non-Light or Dark Forward in your Break Zone and put it into play. For the first ability, if the cost to play Lenna is paid at least partially through discarding cards, you can choose one of the cards you discarded provided it fits the limitation because by the time the ability is added to the stack, the discarded card is in your Break Zone and thus a valid target. For the second, you cannot choose a card you discarded to pay for her ability because it was not in your Break Zone at the time since you must choose a target prior to paying for the ability.

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** Targeting rules are tricky, particularly because of how the game's effect resolution work. When Summons or Abilities are used, targets must be valid prior to the effect even being paid for, otherwise the play is not legal. Comes-into-play effects however differ because those effects don't occur until ''after'' they're paid for.the card that has the effect enters the field. For example, Lenna has two effects: when she comes into play, you can choose a Forward of cost 2 or less in your Break Zone and put it into play for free. She also has an effect that lets you choose a non-Light or Dark Forward in your Break Zone and put it into play. For the first ability, if the cost to play Lenna is paid at least partially through discarding cards to generate Crystal Points (the in-game resource used to play cards, which are gained either through "dulling" (tapping) Backups or discarding cards in your hand), you can choose one of the cards you discarded provided it fits the limitation because by the time the ability is added to the stack, the discarded card is in your Break Zone and thus a valid target. For the second, you cannot choose a card you discarded to pay for her ability because it was not in your Break Zone at the time since and you must choose a target prior to paying for the ability.


** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, because by the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the effect is from a Summon or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all targets must be valid when you play the Summon or Action/Special Ability before paying the costs. For an example, Miner has two abilities: when he enters the field, you can choose a Backup in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The first ability, you can retrieve a Backup you discarded to pay the cost to put him into play. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his ability because it's not in the Break Zone at the time you choose the target.

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** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, Targeting rules are tricky, particularly because by of how the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the game's effect is from a Summon resolution work. When Summons or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all Abilities are used, targets must be valid when you prior to the effect even being paid for, otherwise the play the Summon or Action/Special Ability before paying the costs. is not legal. Comes-into-play effects however differ because those effects don't occur until ''after'' they're paid for. For an example, Miner Lenna has two abilities: effects: when he enters the field, she comes into play, you can choose a Backup Forward of cost 2 or less in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, play for free. She also has an effect that lets you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a non-Light or Dark Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The play. For the first ability, if the cost to play Lenna is paid at least partially through discarding cards, you can retrieve choose one of the cards you discarded provided it fits the limitation because by the time the ability is added to the stack, the discarded card is in your Break Zone and thus a Backup valid target. For the second, you cannot choose a card you discarded to pay the cost to put him into play. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his for her ability because it's it was not in the your Break Zone at the time since you must choose a target prior to paying for the target.ability.
** Rules for break (destroy) effects have nuances that are not readily evident for Forwards. When a Forward takes damage equal to or greater than its power or is chosen by an effect that says to break a Forward, the Forward is broken and put into the Break Zone (discard pile). Some Forwards have restrictions on what can or cannot break them. Galuf from the Opus VII set for example can't be broken at all during his controller's turn, and Vincent from Opus II can't be broken by effects that don't deal damage. However, there are two ways of getting around those. If an effect removes a Forward from the game, it gets around break effects because removing from the game is not the same as breaking. Similarly, if an effect is worded that you "put" a Forward into the Break Zone, that does not count as breaking the Forward either. Reducing a Forward's power to zero makes the Forward's controller "put" it into the Break Zone, so that doesn't count as a break effect either. So for the aforementioned Galuf and Vincent, removing them from the game or being forced to "put" them into the Break Zone gets around their break restrictions.


* The increased quarterback protection rules have come under intense scrutiny in recent years, in the same vein as the targeting rule. The idea of it is to protect quarterbacks from unnecessary late hits by ensuring players can only hit the quarterback before he throws the football on a passing play, or immediately after the quarterback releases, when the defender is already in the process of the tackle. However, "immediately after the quarterback releases" is subject to the judgement of the officials. This leads to instances where [[https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/chiefs-linebacker-explains-why-he-didnt-sack-tom-brady-on-qbs-touchdown-run/ defenders didn't make an attempt to tackle a quarterback, believing he had thrown the football, only for the quarterback to make a large gain,]] as well as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xn83NcpAQsg defenders getting flagged on what many found to be clean, legal hits]].

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* The increased quarterback protection rules have come under intense scrutiny in recent years, in the same vein as the targeting rule. The idea of it is to protect quarterbacks from unnecessary late hits by ensuring players can only hit the quarterback before he throws the football on a passing play, or immediately after the quarterback releases, when the defender is already in the process of the tackle. However, "immediately after the quarterback releases" is subject to the judgement of the officials. This leads to instances where [[https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/chiefs-linebacker-explains-why-he-didnt-sack-tom-brady-on-qbs-touchdown-run/ defenders didn't make an attempt to tackle a quarterback, believing he had thrown the football, only for the quarterback to make a large gain,]] as well as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xn83NcpAQsg defenders getting flagged on what many found to be clean, legal hits]].
hits]], culminating in a pair of "Roughing the Passer" penalties in the AFC Championship game, in which Brady had his shoulder dusted and Mahomes was grazed below the knees by their would-be tacklers.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' has two rules in its card minigame, Plus and Random. Random is straightforward - your hand is randomized (instead of choosing 5 cards you want), which usually means having to play with sub-par cards. Plus, however, looks straight (if a card is adjacent to two cards, and you can add a single number to card's stats to match the stats of those two cards, both cards are flipped), but ends up being a huge pain in the neck, since it also triggers Combo (cards flipped by Plus, Same or Combo will also flip all adjacent cards with lower stats), allowing the AI to possibly flip the entire table in one move. Not to mention, unlike Same, Plus opportunities are ''very'' easy to overlook, resulting in the AI abusing the rule for all its' worth to pull off wins out of pretty much thin air.


** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, because by the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the effect is from a Summon or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all targets must be valid when you play the Summon or Action/Special Ability before paying the costs. For an example, Miner has two abilities: when he enters the field, you can choose a Backup in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The first ability, you can retrieve a Backup you discarded to pay his effect. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his ability because it's not in the Break Zone at the time you choose the target.

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** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, because by the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the effect is from a Summon or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all targets must be valid when you play the Summon or Action/Special Ability before paying the costs. For an example, Miner has two abilities: when he enters the field, you can choose a Backup in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The first ability, you can retrieve a Backup you discarded to pay his effect.the cost to put him into play. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his ability because it's not in the Break Zone at the time you choose the target.


** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, because by the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the effect is from a Summon or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all targets must be valid when you play the Summon or Activated/Special Ability before paying the costs. For an example, Miner has two abilities: when he enters the field, you can choose a Backup in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The first ability, you can retrieve a Backup you discarded to pay his effect. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his ability because it's not in the Break Zone at the time you choose the target.

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** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, because by the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the effect is from a Summon or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all targets must be valid when you play the Summon or Activated/Special Action/Special Ability before paying the costs. For an example, Miner has two abilities: when he enters the field, you can choose a Backup in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The first ability, you can retrieve a Backup you discarded to pay his effect. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his ability because it's not in the Break Zone at the time you choose the target.

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** Crystal Points (the in-game resources used to play cards) can be generated either by dulling (tapping) Backups, which gives you one Crystal Point for each Backup dulled, or discarding cards, which give you two Crystal Points for each card discarded. One thing that can cause confusion is if a card lets you play a card in your Break Zone (graveyard) to the field or lets you put a card in your Break Zone into your hand, can you target a card that was discarded? If the effect is a comes-into-play effect from a Character card (Forward, Backup, or Monster) you can, because by the time the Character's ability goes on the stack, the card(s) discarded are in the Break Zone and thus valid targets. If the effect is from a Summon or an Action or Special Ability, you can't, because all targets must be valid when you play the Summon or Activated/Special Ability before paying the costs. For an example, Miner has two abilities: when he enters the field, you can choose a Backup in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. For one Earth and one other Crystal Point, you can put Miner into the Break Zone to choose a Forward in your Break Zone and put it into your hand. The first ability, you can retrieve a Backup you discarded to pay his effect. For the second, you cannot, because you have to pick the target before paying the cost, and thus you can't pick the card you discard to use his ability because it's not in the Break Zone at the time you choose the target.


** Combat has the following phases: Combat Preparation, Combat, Combat Resolution. It seems straightforward: you prepare for combat with effects, you choose a Forward to attack, if your opponent has a Forward that can block, he chooses which one will block (if any), and then combat resolves with the Forwards dealing damage to each other. But there's subtleties that can escape players:
*** Once you go into Combat Preparation, any effects that occur when you enter combat occur and can't be stopped by removing the Forward with the ability. You would have to do so before Combat Preparation occurs, meaning you'd need to do so before you even get to the Combat Phase for that turn.

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** Combat has the following phases: Combat Preparation, Combat, Combat Resolution. It seems straightforward: you prepare for combat with effects, you choose a Forward to attack, if your opponent has a Forward that can block, he chooses which one will block (if any), and then combat resolves with the Forwards dealing damage to each other.other or, if the attacker is unblocked, to the opponent directly. But there's subtleties that can escape players:
*** Once you go into Combat Preparation, any effects that occur when you enter combat occur trigger and can't be stopped by removing the Forward with the ability. You would have to do so before Combat Preparation occurs, meaning you'd need to do so before you even get to the Combat Phase for that turn.


*** Once a Forward is attacking, it's attacking, and while the opponent can get rid of the attacking Forward with a Summon or Ability, effects that occur when a Forward attacks would still go off. Getting rid of the attacking Forward at this time effectively cancels the attack, and no damage is dealt.

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*** Once a Forward is attacking, it's attacking, and while the opponent can get rid of the attacking Forward with a Summon or Ability, effects that occur when a Forward attacks would still go off. Getting rid of the attacking Forward at this time effectively cancels the attack, and no prevents damage is dealt.from being dealt to the opponent.



** EX Bursts are effects that occur when you take damage: when you take damage, you flip the top card of your deck. If it has the EX Burst logo, the effect occurs immediately without having to pay the card's cost. What trips players up with it:
*** EX Bursts are not mandatory. If an opponent flips over a card for an EX Burst but decides they're better off not using it, they can choose to ignore it.

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** EX Bursts are effects that occur when you take damage: when you take damage, you flip the top card of your deck. If it has the EX Burst logo, the EX Burst effect occurs immediately without having to pay the card's cost. What trips players up with it:
*** EX Bursts are not mandatory. If an opponent flips over a card for an EX Burst is flipped up but the player who took the damage decides they're better off not using it, they can choose to ignore it.



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* The increased quarterback protection rules have come under intense scrutiny in recent years, in the same vein as the targeting rule. The idea of it is to protect quarterbacks from unnecessary late hits by ensuring players can only hit the quarterback before he throws the football on a passing play, or immediately after the quarterback releases, when the defender is already in the process of the tackle. However, "immediately after the quarterback releases" is subject to the judgement of the officials. This leads to instances where [[https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/chiefs-linebacker-explains-why-he-didnt-sack-tom-brady-on-qbs-touchdown-run/ defenders didn't make an attempt to tackle a quarterback, believing he had thrown the football, only for the quarterback to make a large gain,]] as well as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xn83NcpAQsg defenders getting flagged on what many found to be clean, legal hits]].




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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KeG_i8CWE8 "An American Coach In London"]] featured Ted Lasso voicing his frustrations with the training official.
--> '''Ted Lasso''': "WILL YOU EXPLAIN TO ME HOW THAT WAS OFFSIDE!? ...no, I'm asking you seriously, explain offside to me.



* Buffalo Sabres fans are the only hockey fans that know the rules on players in the goal crease, the result of Brett Hull scoring a controversial Cup-winning goal off his own rebound in the third overtime period of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals. Video replay showed that Hull's skate was in the crease (i.e. the area in front of the goal, reserved for the goalie), which the Sabres argued was a violation of a rule then in effect that disallowed goals if an offensive player was in the goal crease. However, the rule stated that a player can enter the crease, as long as he has control of the puck, and the refs ruled that since Brett's shot rebounded to him, he had never lost control of the puck. After ''that'' disaster, [[ObviousRulePatch the rules were changed,]] so that the player could now be in the goal crease, as long as they do not touch the goaltender. This led to some angry goaltenders as opposed to some angry Sabres fans.

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* Buffalo Sabres fans are the only hockey fans that know the rules on players in the goal crease, the result of Brett Hull scoring a controversial Cup-winning goal off his own rebound in the third overtime period of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals.finals in 1999. Video replay showed that Hull's skate was in the crease (i.e. the area in front of the goal, reserved for the goalie), which the Sabres argued was a violation of a rule then in effect that disallowed goals if an offensive player was in the goal crease. However, the rule stated that a player can enter the crease, as long as he has control of the puck, and the refs ruled that since Brett's shot rebounded to him, he had never lost control of the puck. After ''that'' disaster, Following that season, [[ObviousRulePatch the rules were changed,]] changed]] so that the player could now be in the goal crease, as long as they do not touch the goaltender. This led to some angry goaltenders as opposed to some angry Sabres fans.fans.
** Worth mentioning as well, that rule change was approved and the teams were notified of the change during that season, though the rule was not put into place. Hull himself noted this when interviewed about the goal, speculating that perhaps [[PoorCommunicationKills only the teams were notified and no one else, leading to the confusion.]]




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* For a solid 62 years (1943-2005), the NHL had a "Two-Line Pass" rule, stating that teams could not pass across more than two solid lines at a time (e.g. a blue line and the halfway line), so as to prevent home-run passes out of the defensive zone to a player breaking behind the defense. While teams learned to play around it, it ultimately led to more stagnant games, as defenses would clutter up the areas these passes needed to go through, forcibly preventing goal-scoring opportunities in a tactic known as the "neutral-zone trap". Fans hated it, and it would result in low-scoring, boring hockey games. Once the rule was ditched, allowing passes to come from any part of the ice, defenses had to account for all parts of the ice, making the sport more dynamic and far more interesting to watch.


** Combat has the following phases: Combat Preparation, Combat, Combat Resolution. It seems straightforward: you prepare for combat with effects, you choose a Forward to attack, if your opponent has a Forward that can block, he chooses which one will block, and then combat resolves with the Forwards dealing damage to each other. But there's subtleties that can escape players:

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** Combat has the following phases: Combat Preparation, Combat, Combat Resolution. It seems straightforward: you prepare for combat with effects, you choose a Forward to attack, if your opponent has a Forward that can block, he chooses which one will block, block (if any), and then combat resolves with the Forwards dealing damage to each other. But there's subtleties that can escape players:



*** Once a Forward is attacking, it's attacking, and while the opponent can get rid of it with a Summon or Ability, effects that occur when a Forward attacks would still go off. Similarly, once you declare an attack, your opponent can't use effects that prevent a Forward from attacking. The opponent must do so during Combat Preparation.
*** Similarly, once a Forward is declared as a blocker, it blocks the attack. Removing the Forward would not cancel the block or let the attacker through. Again, effects which would prevent Forwards from blocking must be used during Combat Preparation or when you declare an attack.

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*** Once a Forward is attacking, it's attacking, and while the opponent can get rid of it the attacking Forward with a Summon or Ability, effects that occur when a Forward attacks would still go off. Similarly, once you declare an Getting rid of the attacking Forward at this time effectively cancels the attack, your opponent can't use effects that prevent a Forward from attacking. The opponent must do so during Combat Preparation.
and no damage is dealt.
*** Similarly, once a Forward is declared as a blocker, it blocks the attack. Removing Unlike attacks, removing the blocking Forward would not cancel the block or let the attacker through. Again, effects which would prevent Forwards from blocking must be used during Combat Preparation or when you declare an attack.through.

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