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** "Beyond the scope" (during cross-examination, the lawyer asks the witness a question about a topic not covered in direct examination. Can also be used during redirect in regards to a topic not brought up during cross.)


[[caption-width-right:324:Okay, now you're just being silly.]]

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[[caption-width-right:324:Okay, now you're just being silly.[[caption-width-right:324:Could be worse. Antoine could have grilled her on the stand instead.]]



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[[caption-width-right:324:Okay, now you're just being silly.]]

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** After the lawyers argue the merits of an objection, the judge will say "(objection) sustained," meaning the judge thinks the objection has merit, and the question or statement has to be moved past without answering or clarifying it. "(Objection) overruled" means the judge thinks the objection doesn't have merit, and things continue as if the previous objection hadn't happened.


* "You don't have to answer that." (A judge can direct the witness not to answer if an objection to the question is sustained. The lawyers ''can't'' (and it's a punishable offense), but will try to do so anyway, at least on TV.)

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* "You don't have to answer that." (A judge can direct the witness not to answer if an objection to the question is sustained. The lawyers generally ''can't'' (and it's a punishable offense), but will try to do so anyway, at least on TV.TV. Note that lawyers can instruct the witness to keep quiet while the judge rules on an objection, especially if the witness is their client.)


** "Witness is not an expert" (Witnesses can only state facts, like what they saw. An expert witness can give opinions, like how long it was between when the victim died and when the police found them, etc.). Getting someone qualified as an expert is either an easy process (a few questions and then asking the court to recognize their expertise), or not contested (prosecutor and defense counsel agrees to the expertise beforehand, and the court is so notified).

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** "Witness is not an expert" (Witnesses can only state facts, like what they saw. saw, and certain limited opinions about matters of common experience, like whether someone was drunk.[[note]]This kind of "lay opinion" evidence is how cops would get DWI convictions before the invention of the breathalyzer, and it still is when the breathalyzer is broken or was improperly calibrated. Interestingly, most jurisdictions do not recognize lay opinion evidence for drug intoxication, creating an entire police specialization in cops trained to recognize the signs of being high on various different drugs, so they can be called as expert witnesses when the police catch someone driving stoned.[[/note]] An expert witness can give opinions, opinions about other matters, like how long it was between when the victim died and when the police found them, etc.). Getting someone qualified as an expert is either an easy process (a few questions and then asking the court to recognize their expertise), or not contested (prosecutor and defense counsel agrees to the expertise beforehand, and the court is so notified).


* "I can no longer represent my client in this matter." (Lawyer speak for, most often, "My client specifically asked me to lie to the court," although it can also mean "My client is a fucking asshole and I hate him and I just can't work with him anymore" or "My client refuses to pay me.")

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* "I can no longer represent my client in this matter." (Lawyer speak for, most often, "My client specifically asked me to lie to the court," although it can also mean "My client is a fucking asshole and I hate him and I just can't work with him anymore" anymore," "My client up and disappeared and I've been trying to find him for months but still have no clue where he is," or "My client refuses to pay me.")


[[quoteright:324:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/badgeringthewitness.png]]

->'''Strong Bad''': This is a subpoena! I summons Exhibit 4-B to my chambers!\\
'''Homestar''': Sustained! ''*hits self with a gavel*''

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[[quoteright:324:http://static.[[quoteright:324:[[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/badgeringthewitness.png]]

png]]]]

->'''Strong Bad''': Bad:''' This is a subpoena! I summons Exhibit 4-B to my chambers!\\
'''Homestar''': '''Homestar:''' Sustained! ''*hits ''[hits self with a gavel*''gavel]''


** In a similar vein "In my chambers, ''now''! Both of you!" (The sort of shenanigans that provoke this in TV Land are generally way past the Mistrial Event Horizon.)

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** In a similar vein * "In my chambers, ''now''! Both of you!" (The sort of shenanigans that provoke this in TV Land are generally way past the Mistrial Event Horizon.)



*** Also parodied in an episode of Series/ChappellesShow

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*** Also parodied in an episode of Series/ChappellesShow''Series/ChappellesShow''



* "I rest my case." (The prosecution or defense believes they have adequately presented their arguments and examined necessary witnesses. Basically, they're done.)
** Note that when the prosecution rests, they still have the option of rebuttal testimony after the defense rests, so they're not really ''done''. However, when the defense rests, they are definitively done (except for cross-examination of rebuttal witnesses, or if the judge allows surrebuttal).
*** In one episode of the TheSimpsons, the lawyer Lionel Hutz brainlessly spouts this phrase after presenting confusing evidence that the man his client is suing has the "evil gene" and is therefore "innocent of not being guilty." "You rest your case?" repeats the judge incredulously. "Oh, I thought that was just a figure of speech," Hutz replies, adding "case closed."

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* "I rest my case." (The prosecution or defense believes they have adequately presented their arguments and examined necessary witnesses. Basically, they're done.)
**
) Note that when the prosecution rests, they still have the option of rebuttal testimony after the defense rests, so they're not really ''done''. However, when the defense rests, they are definitively done (except for cross-examination of rebuttal witnesses, or if the judge allows surrebuttal).
*** ** In one episode of the TheSimpsons, the lawyer Lionel Hutz brainlessly spouts this phrase after presenting confusing evidence that the man his client is suing has the "evil gene" and is therefore "innocent of not being guilty." "You rest your case?" repeats the judge incredulously. "Oh, I thought that was just a figure of speech," Hutz replies, adding "case closed."



* "I'll allow it" (The judge has just permitted a motion by an participating attorney to go ahead)

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* "I'll allow it" (The judge has just permitted a motion by an a participating attorney to go ahead)



** "Withdrawn" (Said by an attorney to supposedly retract a statement before it is stricken from the record)
*** In most cases in RealLife, simply saying "withdrawn" isn't enough. You could be subject to penalties or fines. If you have a reputation for constantly making inflammatory statements (see [[Franchise/LawAndOrder Jack McCoy]]), you won't have any leeway at all, and you're likely to hurt your case by trying to pull this off. You'll also push yourself closer and closer to mistrial with each offense.

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** * "Withdrawn" (Said by an attorney to supposedly retract a statement before it is stricken from the record)
***
record.) In most cases in RealLife, simply saying "withdrawn" isn't enough. You could be subject to penalties or fines. If you have a reputation for constantly making inflammatory statements (see [[Franchise/LawAndOrder Jack McCoy]]), you won't have any leeway at all, and you're likely to hurt your case by trying to pull this off. You'll also push yourself closer and closer to mistrial with each offense.





[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/badgeringthewitness.png]]

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[[quoteright:253:[[Franchise/AceAttorney http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/medium_phoenix_wright_objection_.gif]]]]
[[caption-width-right:253:Overruled!]]



->'''Strong Bad''': This is a subpoena! I summons Exhibit 4-B to my chambers!
->'''Homestar''': Sustained! ''*hits self with a gavel*''

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[[quoteright:253:[[Franchise/AceAttorney http://static.%% Image selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1512355784029007800
%% Please do not replace or remove without starting a new thread.
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/medium_phoenix_wright_objection_.gif]]]]
[[caption-width-right:253:Overruled!]]



org/pmwiki/pub/images/badgeringthewitness.png]]

->'''Strong Bad''': This is a subpoena! I summons Exhibit 4-B to my chambers!
->'''Homestar''':
chambers!\\
'''Homestar''':
Sustained! ''*hits self with a gavel*''


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** "Witness is not an expert" (Witnesses can only state facts, like what they saw. An expert witness can give opinions, like how long it was between when the victim died and when the police found them, etc.). Getting someone qualified as an expert is either an easy process (a few questions and then asking the court to recognize their expertise), or not contested (prosecutor and defense council agrees to the expertise beforehand, and the court is so notified).

to:

** "Witness is not an expert" (Witnesses can only state facts, like what they saw. An expert witness can give opinions, like how long it was between when the victim died and when the police found them, etc.). Getting someone qualified as an expert is either an easy process (a few questions and then asking the court to recognize their expertise), or not contested (prosecutor and defense council counsel agrees to the expertise beforehand, and the court is so notified).


** The United States introduced "affirming" in the 1780s to answer the objections of those whose religious convictions wouldn't let them say the "God" part or swear on Literature/TheBible. [[note]]Before this, it wouldn't be a stretch that anyone who ''wouldn't'' swear on a Bible [[BurnTheWitch might find themselves tied to a flaming piece of wood.]][[/note]]

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** The United States introduced "affirming" in the 1780s to answer the objections of those whose religious convictions wouldn't let them say the "God" part or swear on Literature/TheBible. [[note]]Before this, it wouldn't be a stretch that anyone who ''wouldn't'' swear on a Bible [[BurnTheWitch might find themselves tied to a flaming piece of wood.]][[/note]]]] Which is in itself interesting, because [[Literature/TheBible the book they're refusing to swear on]] says "Do not swear [...] any other oath, but let your "Yes" be "Yes," and your "No," "No."[[/note]]


*** In one episode of the TheSimpsons, the lawyer Lionel Hutz brainlessly spouts this phrase after presenting confusing evidence that the man his client is suing has the "evil gene" and is therefore "innocent of not being guilty." "You rest your case?" asks the judge incredulously. "Oh, I thought that was just a figure of speech," Hutz replies, adding "case closed."

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*** In one episode of the TheSimpsons, the lawyer Lionel Hutz brainlessly spouts this phrase after presenting confusing evidence that the man his client is suing has the "evil gene" and is therefore "innocent of not being guilty." "You rest your case?" asks repeats the judge incredulously. "Oh, I thought that was just a figure of speech," Hutz replies, adding "case closed."

Added DiffLines:

*** In one episode of the TheSimpsons, the lawyer Lionel Hutz brainlessly spouts this phrase after presenting confusing evidence that the man his client is suing has the "evil gene" and is therefore "innocent of not being guilty." "You rest your case?" asks the judge incredulously. "Oh, I thought that was just a figure of speech," Hutz replies, adding "case closed."

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