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* Many fans were nervous ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' would be subject to this once the two leads finally [[RelationshipUpgrade hooked up]] in the movie and found that the series [[SoWhatDoWeDoNow still had another season]]. To their credit, the writers kept the relationship instead of [[ResetButton copping out]]. There are differing opinions on how well their romance was handled(the majority found it well handled), but most fans think it was good enough to [[AvertedTrope avert]] this trope. It helps that, even as a couple, they were still written with the same dynamic as when they were JustFriends; Kim would still snark at Ron or [[DeathGlare glare]] at him if he said/did something she thought was stupid, but it was balanced out with the occasional kiss or other romantic gesture.

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* Many fans were nervous ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' would be subject to this once the two leads finally [[RelationshipUpgrade hooked up]] in the movie and found that the series [[SoWhatDoWeDoNow still had another season]]. To their credit, the writers kept the relationship instead of [[ResetButton copping out]]. There are some differing opinions on how well their romance was handled(the majority found it well handled), but most fans think it was good enough to [[AvertedTrope avert]] this trope. It helps that, even as a couple, they were still written with the same dynamic as when they were JustFriends; Kim would still snark at Ron or [[DeathGlare glare]] at him if he said/did something she thought was stupid, but it was balanced out with the occasional kiss or other romantic gesture.

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* ''Literature/{{Percy Jackson And The Olympians}}'' actually lampshades this in The Mark of Athena, when Aphrodite outright states that while [[spoiler:Percy and Annabeth]] were fun to play around with in the first series, they're no longer interesting to watch now that they've gotten together.


* Many fans were nervous ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' would be subject to this once the two leads finally [[RelationshipUpgrade hooked up]] in the movie and found that the series [[SoWhatDoWeDoNow still had another season]]. To their credit, the writers kept the relationship instead of [[ResetButton copping out]]. There are differing opinions on how well their romance was handled, but most fans think it was good enough to [[AvertedTrope avert]] this trope. It helps that, even as a couple, they were still written with the same dynamic as when they were JustFriends; Kim would still snark at Ron or [[DeathGlare glare]] at him if he said/did something she thought was stupid, but it was balanced out with the occasional kiss or other romantic gesture.

to:

* Many fans were nervous ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' would be subject to this once the two leads finally [[RelationshipUpgrade hooked up]] in the movie and found that the series [[SoWhatDoWeDoNow still had another season]]. To their credit, the writers kept the relationship instead of [[ResetButton copping out]]. There are differing opinions on how well their romance was handled, handled(the majority found it well handled), but most fans think it was good enough to [[AvertedTrope avert]] this trope. It helps that, even as a couple, they were still written with the same dynamic as when they were JustFriends; Kim would still snark at Ron or [[DeathGlare glare]] at him if he said/did something she thought was stupid, but it was balanced out with the occasional kiss or other romantic gesture.

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* ''Webcomic/QuestionableContent'': Referenced by Wil the poet after he [[RelationshipUpgrade settles into a relationship]]. He ends up [[https://questionablecontent.net/view.php?comic=2023 eavesdropping]] on people [[DrowningOurRomanticSorrows Drowning their Romantic Sorrows]] at the bar:
-->'''Elliot:''' I fail to see how that would make me feel any-- are you ''taking notes?''\\
'''Wil:''' Ever since I got a girlfriend, my life has been entirely devoid of pathos! This is primo material!

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* Allura/Lance was never the most popular pairing of ''WesternAnimation/VoltronLegendaryDefender'', but it did have a reasonably dedicated following - one that was decidedly not interested in it when it became canon. On top of reading as a rebound due to coming right after Allura's breakup with Lotor (which meant that Lance was AlwaysSecondBest in his ''relationships'' as well as everything else in life) and the "wear the girl down" implications the relationship had for Allura, the writers didn't seem to have any idea how to handle the pairing or how to make interesting interactions with them. It dominated most of their scenes in the seventh and eighth seasons, and mostly came across as tedious and cliche, on top of [[{{Flanderization}} largely eating]] [[SatelliteLoveInterest Lance's characterization.]] Its culmination in [[spoiler:Allura's death, followed by Lance inexplicably turning Altean and giving up his dreams of being a space pilot to become a farmer]], just made the whole thing even less appealing.


* ''Webcomic/MenageA3'' habitually averts the trope by being a SexComedy much more than it's any sort of romance, whatever some fannish shippers might want. The characters get into ''[[EveryoneHasLotsOfSex relationships]],'' but these are generally short-lived or incredibly unstable, and are frequently obviously bad ideas from the first; hence, they may crash and burn, or just fizzle due to bad communication. Any pairing that the shippers might suggest (''[[EveryoneIsBi any pairing]]'') can happen, but it probably won't end anything much. Even when the lead character who started the comic as a desperate virgin got laid, it involved a previously minor character, the relationship promptly crashed, and the ex-virgin didn't change much as a person. It's assumed by most of the fan base that most of the main cast will end up in long-term relationships when the comic comes to an end, and various final pairings are discussed from time to time, but it would be dangerous to bet on anything.
* ''WebComic/GirlsWithSlingshots'' has generally averted this when dealing with [[BetaCouple secondary characters' relationships]], like Thea and Mimi, Chris and Melody, and Maureen and Jameson...etc (although probably because they did not receive as much focus as the main characters), but this was interestingly played with in its treatment of the relationship between main character, Hazel, and Zach: At first they started with tons of UnresolvedSexualTension and WillTheyOrWontThey moments, then they finally hooked up and became a couple. But problems started to arise in that Hazel received no CharacterDevelopment whatsoever and continued to be the same [[UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist selfish]] and [[ManChild immature person]], at first this was PlayedForLaughs and for a large chunk of the webcomic's run, Zach was portrayed as the infinitely patient and perfect wish-fulfilment boyfriend who selflessly put up with a girlfriend who gave nothing back to the relationship other than sex and the sight of being drunk, this caused a lot of [[WhatDoesSheSeeInHim What Does He See in Her?]] and NoAccountingForTaste reactions in the readers. The author most have realized this, so [[AuthorsSavingThrow this was taken]] to its [[{{Deconstruction}} logical conclussion]] when Hazel's antics pushed Zach too far and made him break up with her. The webcomic ended with Hazel and Zach settling BetterAsFriends and walking together to the sunset.

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* ''Webcomic/MenageA3'' habitually averts the trope by being a SexComedy much more than it's any sort of romance, whatever some fannish shippers might want. The characters get into ''[[EveryoneHasLotsOfSex relationships]],'' but these are generally short-lived or incredibly unstable, and are frequently obviously bad ideas from the first; hence, they may crash and burn, or just fizzle due to bad communication. Any pairing that the shippers might suggest (''[[EveryoneIsBi any pairing]]'') can happen, but it probably won't end anything much. Even when the lead character who started the comic as a desperate virgin got laid, it involved a previously minor character, the relationship promptly crashed, and the ex-virgin didn't change much as a person. It's assumed by most Most of the fan base accurately predicted that most of the main cast will would end up in long-term relationships when towards the comic comes end of the comic, with any shipping discussions to an end, and various be had being predictions on what the final pairings are discussed from time to time, but it would be dangerous to bet on anything.
ultimately be, though strong bets were avoided until the the creators alerted the readers about the approaching finale.
* ''WebComic/GirlsWithSlingshots'' has generally averted this when dealing with [[BetaCouple secondary characters' relationships]], like Thea and Mimi, Chris and Melody, and Maureen and Jameson...etc (although probably because they did not receive as much focus as the main characters), but this was interestingly played with in its treatment of the relationship between main character, Hazel, and Zach: At first they started with tons of UnresolvedSexualTension and WillTheyOrWontThey moments, then they finally hooked up and became a couple. But problems started to arise in that Hazel received no CharacterDevelopment whatsoever and continued to be the same [[UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist selfish]] and [[ManChild immature person]], at first this was PlayedForLaughs and for a large chunk of the webcomic's run, Zach was portrayed as the infinitely patient and perfect wish-fulfilment boyfriend who selflessly put up with a girlfriend who gave nothing back to the relationship other than sex and the sight of being drunk, this caused a lot of [[WhatDoesSheSeeInHim What Does He See in Her?]] and NoAccountingForTaste reactions in the readers. The author most must have realized this, so [[AuthorsSavingThrow this was taken]] to its [[{{Deconstruction}} logical conclussion]] when Hazel's antics pushed Zach too far and made him break up with her. The webcomic ended with Hazel and Zach settling BetterAsFriends and walking together to the sunset.


* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Peter Parker and Mary Jane, according to Creator/JoeQuesada. Peter and Mary Jane were HappilyMarried for around 20 years. Joey Q, resident Editor in Chief, decides that Peter being single would lead to far more interesting stories than being tied down. Cue ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', massive ShipSinking, Quesada ''instantly'' drawing more backlash than his already-controversial DC counterpart Creator/DanDiDio ever managed, and an InternetBackdraft that is still present to this day. The newspaper strips, in contrast, continued to keep the duo together in a stable married relationship.

to:

* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Peter Parker and Mary Jane, according to Creator/JoeQuesada. Peter and Mary Jane were HappilyMarried for around 20 years. Joey Q, resident Editor in Chief, decides that Peter being single would lead to far more interesting stories than being tied down. Cue ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', massive ShipSinking, Quesada ''instantly'' drawing more backlash than his already-controversial DC counterpart Creator/DanDiDio ever managed, and an InternetBackdraft that is still present to this day. The newspaper strips, in contrast, continued to keep the duo together in a stable married relationship.relationship, while the alternate universe series ''ComicBook/RenewYourVows'' also kept them together while making them a SuperFamilyTeam with their child Annie May.


Another contributing factor is that writing a convincing relationship, with genuine depth of character and development, is a much more difficult feat than pouring on the quick-reaction drama and will-they-won't-they, far above and beyond an actual RelationshipWritingFumble. Once that crutch of anticipation "romance" is no longer there for the writer to lean on, weaknesses in the writing suddenly show through that the audience was too distracted by the narrative tension to notice -- or care about -- earlier. When the writing is too thin, there's just nothing much there afterwards (after the TheyDo) for the audience to care about or invest in. If the writing doesn't have actual substance, the writer can only really rely on cheap narrative tricks to keep their audience.

to:

Another contributing factor is that writing a convincing relationship, with genuine depth of character and development, is a much more difficult feat than pouring on the quick-reaction drama and will-they-won't-they, far above and beyond an actual RelationshipWritingFumble. Once that crutch of anticipation "romance" is no longer there for the writer to lean on, weaknesses in the writing suddenly show through that the audience was too distracted by the narrative tension to notice -- or care about -- earlier. When the writing is too thin, there's just nothing much there afterwards (after the TheyDo) for the audience to care about or invest in. If the writing doesn't have actual substance, the writer can only really rely on cheap narrative tricks to keep their audience.
audience. On top of that, any problems or twists with an actual ongoing romance can end up being blood in the water for rival factions of shippers.



* ''ComicBook/AvatarTheLastAirbenderThePromise'' runs into this with Aang and Katara. After they hooked up at literally the very end of the original series, the comic continuation has them as a SickeninglySweethearts couple and Katara being reduced to secondary character, killing interest in both fans [[InUniverse and their friends]]. They eventually do move past SickeninglySweethearts, but beyond that there really isn't anything interestingly done with them bar maybe one moment where Katara reflects how their relationship mirrors the multicultural heritage of the colonies over which Aang and Zuko are currently arguing.

to:

* ''ComicBook/AvatarTheLastAirbenderThePromise'' runs into this with Aang and Katara. After they hooked up at literally the very end of the original series, the comic continuation has them as a SickeninglySweethearts couple and Katara being reduced to a far more secondary character, killing interest in both fans [[InUniverse and their friends]]. They eventually do move past SickeninglySweethearts, but beyond that there really isn't anything interestingly done with them bar maybe one moment where Katara reflects how their relationship mirrors the multicultural heritage of the colonies over which Aang and Zuko are currently arguing.arguing.
** Mai and Zuko had similar problems - though they'd been together in the series proper, it only got focus in a handful of episodes and they spent far more time apart than together. When ''The Promise'' took the pairing to the center and removed the biggest reason for them to not like each other (Zuko's guilt about betraying his uncle), it became evident that the two had almost no chemistry, while Mai proved decidedly unsympathetic. It was so poorly received that it had people latching onto Zuko/''Suki'' after they shared a few conversations, in the hopes that maybe the comic was leading in a different direction.


* ''ComicBook/AvatarTheLastAirbenderThePromise'' runs into this with Aang and Katara. After they hooked up at literally the very end of the original series, the comic continuation has them as a SickeninglySweethearts couple and Katara being reduced to a damsel in distress, trophy girlfriend, killing interest in both fans [[InUniverse and their friends]].

to:

* ''ComicBook/AvatarTheLastAirbenderThePromise'' runs into this with Aang and Katara. After they hooked up at literally the very end of the original series, the comic continuation has them as a SickeninglySweethearts couple and Katara being reduced to a damsel in distress, trophy girlfriend, secondary character, killing interest in both fans [[InUniverse and their friends]]. They eventually do move past SickeninglySweethearts, but beyond that there really isn't anything interestingly done with them bar maybe one moment where Katara reflects how their relationship mirrors the multicultural heritage of the colonies over which Aang and Zuko are currently arguing.


* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Peter Parker and Mary Jane, according to Creator/JoeQuesada. Peter and Mary Jane were HappilyMarried for around 20 years. Joey Q, resident Editor in Chief, decides that Peter being single would lead to far more interesting stories than being tied down. Cue ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', massive ShipSinking, Quesada ''instantly'' drawing more backlash than his already-controversial DC counterpart Creator/DanDiDio ever managed, and an InternetBackdraft that is still present to this day. The newspaper strips however have kept them married and the pair have enjoyed twenty-eight years of reasonable stability.
* ''ComicBook/AvatarTheLastAirbenderThePromise'' runs into this with Aang and Katara. After they hooked up at literally the very end of the original series, the comic continuation has to treat them as a real couple, with the SickeninglySweethearts nature of it and Katara being reduced to a damsel in distress, trophy girlfriend killing interest in both fans [[InUniverse and their friends]].

to:

* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Peter Parker and Mary Jane, according to Creator/JoeQuesada. Peter and Mary Jane were HappilyMarried for around 20 years. Joey Q, resident Editor in Chief, decides that Peter being single would lead to far more interesting stories than being tied down. Cue ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', massive ShipSinking, Quesada ''instantly'' drawing more backlash than his already-controversial DC counterpart Creator/DanDiDio ever managed, and an InternetBackdraft that is still present to this day. The newspaper strips however have kept them strips, in contrast, continued to keep the duo together in a stable married and the pair have enjoyed twenty-eight years of reasonable stability.
relationship.
* ''ComicBook/AvatarTheLastAirbenderThePromise'' runs into this with Aang and Katara. After they hooked up at literally the very end of the original series, the comic continuation has to treat them as a real couple, with the SickeninglySweethearts nature of it couple and Katara being reduced to a damsel in distress, trophy girlfriend girlfriend, killing interest in both fans [[InUniverse and their friends]].


* Happens whenever lesbians hook up in German soap operas. In this case, it's literally "bed" death, as most of the time the pair is seen sitting on the edge of a bed, holding hands -- and doing nothing else. Oh, with the exception of talking for countless scenes (but then again, TalkingIsAFreeAction).


Another contributing factor is that writing a convincing relationship, with genuine depth of character and development, is a much more difficult feat than pouring on the quick-reaction drama and will-they-won't-they, far above and beyond an actual RelationshipWritingFumble. Once that crutch of anticipation "romance" is no longer there for the writer to lean on, weaknesses in the writing suddenly show through that the audience was too distracted by the narrative tension to notice -- or care about -- earlier. When the writing is too thin, there's just nothing much there afterwards (after the TheyDo) for the audience to care about or invest in. If your writing doesn't have actual substance, the writer can only really rely on cheap narrative tricks to keep their audience.

to:

Another contributing factor is that writing a convincing relationship, with genuine depth of character and development, is a much more difficult feat than pouring on the quick-reaction drama and will-they-won't-they, far above and beyond an actual RelationshipWritingFumble. Once that crutch of anticipation "romance" is no longer there for the writer to lean on, weaknesses in the writing suddenly show through that the audience was too distracted by the narrative tension to notice -- or care about -- earlier. When the writing is too thin, there's just nothing much there afterwards (after the TheyDo) for the audience to care about or invest in. If your the writing doesn't have actual substance, the writer can only really rely on cheap narrative tricks to keep their audience.


Another possible reason for the above is that writing a convincing relationship, with genuine depth of character and development, is a much more difficult feat than pouring on the quick-reaction drama and will-they-won't-they. Once that latter crutch is no longer there for the writer to lean on, weaknesses in the writing suddenly show through that the audience was too distracted by the narrative tension to notice -- or care about -- earlier.

This trope may be an extreme reflection of [[http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4478040.stm what tends to happen, over time, to real life relationships]]; after the first year, the "honeymoon" of the romance is over. Few writers seek to capitalize on the RuleOfDrama potential here.

to:

Another possible reason for the above contributing factor is that writing a convincing relationship, with genuine depth of character and development, is a much more difficult feat than pouring on the quick-reaction drama and will-they-won't-they. will-they-won't-they, far above and beyond an actual RelationshipWritingFumble. Once that latter crutch of anticipation "romance" is no longer there for the writer to lean on, weaknesses in the writing suddenly show through that the audience was too distracted by the narrative tension to notice -- or care about -- earlier.

earlier. When the writing is too thin, there's just nothing much there afterwards (after the TheyDo) for the audience to care about or invest in. If your writing doesn't have actual substance, the writer can only really rely on cheap narrative tricks to keep their audience.

This trope may be an extreme reflection of [[http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4478040.stm what tends to happen, over time, to real life relationships]]; after the first year, the "honeymoon" of the romance is over. Or rather, when the easy excitement of getting together is over and the couple have to actually work on the relationship. Few writers seek to capitalize on the RuleOfDrama potential here.


* ''Series/{{Castle}}'': It was widely speculated that the show would never put Castle and Beckett together, as the show was powered by the UST between the two leads, and the fandom is powerfully driven by shipping. Even Castle's actor, Creator/NathanFillion, was openly against it. However, the two finally hooked up (although they haven't married yet) at the end of Season 4, and have been happily in a relationship all through Season 5. Even Fillion admits he was wrong and the "Moonlighting Curse" has been broken. Season 4 (and season 3 to a lesser extent) are considered weak points, because the attempts to keep Castle and Beckett apart were pretty flimsy anyway. A good example is "The Limey". Castle and Beckett were each given a new RomanticFalseLead in the episode. Interestingly, instead of audience anger being directed toward the false leads (which happened previously with False Leads such as Detective Demming and Josh Davidson), the majority of the frustration instead landed on ''Castle and Beckett'', since they stubbornly refused to have a mature conversation about their feeling for each other, making it a rather obvious attempt to artificially extend the tension, leading fans to simply say "get on with it!"

to:

* ''Series/{{Castle}}'': It was widely speculated that the show would never put Castle and Beckett together, as the show was powered by the UST between the two leads, and the fandom is powerfully driven by shipping. Even Castle's actor, Creator/NathanFillion, was openly against it. However, the two finally hooked up (although they haven't married yet) at the end of Season 4, and have been happily in a relationship all through Season 5. Even Fillion admits he was wrong and the "Moonlighting Curse" has been broken. Season 4 (and season 3 to a lesser extent) are considered weak points, because the attempts to keep Castle and Beckett apart were pretty flimsy anyway. A good example is "The Limey". Castle and Beckett were each given a new RomanticFalseLead in the episode. Interestingly, instead of audience anger being directed toward the false leads (which happened previously with False Leads such as Detective Demming and Josh Davidson), the majority of the frustration instead landed on ''Castle and Beckett'', since they stubbornly refused to have a mature conversation about their feeling feelings for each other, making it a rather obvious attempt to artificially extend the tension, leading fans to simply say "get on with it!"

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