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** '''Light [=RPGs=]''' often focus on cinematic narratives and memorable characters, usually, but not always, with a more linear gameplay and less direct customization than Western [=RPGs=]; Light [=RPGs=] typically have a similar feel to {{visual novel}}s, [[{{Film}} feature films]] or {{anime}}. Until recently, most such games came from Japan, and are thus nicknamed {{JRPG}}s. A good point of distinction is that [=WRPGs=] typically have some CharacterCustomization, whereas an Light [=RPG=] will more likely have a preset PlayerCharacter, who might have some customization applied to things like their abilities and equipment/clothing but their personality and physical appearance will always be the same. Light [=RPGs=] tend to use a [[TurnBasedCombat turn-based]] or [[CombatantCooldownSystem pseudo-turn-based system]] where the player individually inputs actions for every character in the team each turn, although some more recent examples use entirely real-time combat systems, albeit ones still very much focused on the tactical use of abilities, positioning, weaknesses, and the like over twitch reflexes. Examples of this sub-genre are the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' franchises.

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** '''Light [=RPGs=]''' often focus on cinematic narratives and memorable characters, usually, but not always, with a more linear gameplay and less direct customization than Western [=RPGs=]; Light [=RPGs=] typically have a similar feel to {{visual novel}}s, [[{{Film}} feature films]] films]], {{anime}}, {{manga}} or {{anime}}.{{light novels}}. Until recently, most such games came from Japan, and are thus nicknamed {{JRPG}}s. A good point of distinction is that [=WRPGs=] typically have some CharacterCustomization, whereas an Light [=RPG=] will more likely have a preset PlayerCharacter, who might have some customization applied to things like their abilities and equipment/clothing but their personality and physical appearance will always be the same. Light [=RPGs=] tend to use a [[TurnBasedCombat turn-based]] or [[CombatantCooldownSystem pseudo-turn-based system]] where the player individually inputs actions for every character in the team each turn, although some more recent examples use entirely real-time combat systems, albeit ones still very much focused on the tactical use of abilities, positioning, weaknesses, and the like over twitch reflexes. Examples of this sub-genre are the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' franchises.

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** '''{{Dungeon Crawl|ing}}ers''' heavily inspired by ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'', the earliest Eastern [=RPGs=], like their Western counterparts, focused on monster-bashing and loot-gathering, with turn-based combat descended from ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' and usually [[ExcusePlot only the barest of bones for a plot]]. Examples include the earliest ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'', ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', and ''VideoGame/MegamiTensei'' games. If that sounds off, it's because the sub-genre was short-lived, as it quickly began evolving into...


** '''Sandbox [=RPGs=]''' were codified by the aforementioned ''Ultima'' series from [[VideoGame/UltimaIV the fourth installment]] onwards. This subgenre is all about free-roaming exploration, character customization, and environment interactivity. Its incumbent king is ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series, though the growing number of WideOpenSandbox games with RPGElements threatens to erase the distinction between the two categories.
** '''Narrative [=RPGs=]''' are the youngest sub-genre codified in the late '90s by ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'' and the ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series, which put the spotlight on their storytelling aspects. These games usually have a compelling character cast and an engaging storyline and, in this, are often compared to contemporaneous Eastern [=RPGs=]. More recent examples of this category include ''Franchise/MassEffect'', ''Franchise/TheWitcher'', and ''Franchise/DragonAge'' series.

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** '''Sandbox [=RPGs=]''' were codified by the aforementioned ''Ultima'' series from [[VideoGame/UltimaIV the fourth installment]] onwards. This subgenre is all about free-roaming exploration, character customization, and environment interactivity. Its incumbent king is ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series, though the growing number of WideOpenSandbox games with RPGElements threatens to erase the distinction between the two categories.
categories (old-school purists would claim that the distinction between the two would be that the Sandbox [=RPG=] focuses on simulating a world and allowing the player character to systemically interact with it, as opposed to simply delivering content, although by this definition the genre is arguably already extinct given the evolution of its tent-pole franchises, its closest living relatives being the more tightly-focused ImmersiveSim).
** '''Narrative [=RPGs=]''' are the youngest sub-genre codified in the late '90s by ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'' and the ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series, which put the spotlight on their storytelling aspects. These games usually have a compelling character cast and an engaging storyline and, in this, are often compared to contemporaneous Eastern [=RPGs=].[=RPGs=], though on the whole they still provide broader choices (both in [[CombatDiplomacyStealth gameplay]] and [[StoryBranching story]]) than their Eastern counterparts. More recent examples of this category include ''Franchise/MassEffect'', ''Franchise/TheWitcher'', and ''Franchise/DragonAge'' series.



** '''Light [=RPGs=]''' often focus on cinematic narratives and memorable characters, usually, but not always, with a more linear gameplay and less direct customization than Western [=RPGs=]; Light [=RPGs=] typically have a similar feel to {{visual novel}}s, [[{{Film}} feature films]] or {{anime}}. Until recently, most such games came from Japan, and are thus nicknamed {{JRPG}}s. A good point of distinction is that [=WRPGs=] typically have some CharacterCustomization, whereas an Light [=RPG=] will more likely have a preset PlayerCharacter, who might have some customization applied to things like their abilities and equipment/clothing but their personality and physical appearance will always be the same. Light [=RPGs=] tend to use a [[TurnBasedCombat turn-based]] or [[CombatantCooldownSystem pseudo-turn-based system]] where the player individually inputs actions for every character in the team each turn. Examples of this sub-genre are the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' franchises.

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** '''Light [=RPGs=]''' often focus on cinematic narratives and memorable characters, usually, but not always, with a more linear gameplay and less direct customization than Western [=RPGs=]; Light [=RPGs=] typically have a similar feel to {{visual novel}}s, [[{{Film}} feature films]] or {{anime}}. Until recently, most such games came from Japan, and are thus nicknamed {{JRPG}}s. A good point of distinction is that [=WRPGs=] typically have some CharacterCustomization, whereas an Light [=RPG=] will more likely have a preset PlayerCharacter, who might have some customization applied to things like their abilities and equipment/clothing but their personality and physical appearance will always be the same. Light [=RPGs=] tend to use a [[TurnBasedCombat turn-based]] or [[CombatantCooldownSystem pseudo-turn-based system]] where the player individually inputs actions for every character in the team each turn.turn, although some more recent examples use entirely real-time combat systems, albeit ones still very much focused on the tactical use of abilities, positioning, weaknesses, and the like over twitch reflexes. Examples of this sub-genre are the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'', ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'', and ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' franchises.


* StatsDissonance \\
A character's stats are to be interpreted outside their usual context.



A party member whose' primary abilities are mostly non-offensive.

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A party member whose' whose primary abilities are mostly non-offensive.

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** SoulsLikeRPG

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*** '''{{Souls Like RPG}}s''' denotes a very specific set that focus heavily on managing stamina and dodging, as well as observing enemy reactions to avoid ''incredibly'' hard hitting attacks. As the name suggests, the ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' franchise popularized the genre.

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->''"For when I want all the freedom of having a story revolve around my choices without being confined by the choices of either going to work or starving."''
-->-- '''Kyle Martin'''


* {{Dating Sim}}s
* {{Farm Life Sim}}s
* [[InteractiveFiction Text Adventure]] / {{Gamebooks}}
* {{LARP}}



* [[InteractiveFiction Text Adventure]] / {{Gamebooks}}
* {{Dating Sim}}s
* TurnBasedTactics
* {{LARP}}




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* TurnBasedTactics


* [[InteractiveFiction Text Adventure]] / ChooseYourOwnAdventure

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* [[InteractiveFiction Text Adventure]] / ChooseYourOwnAdventure{{Gamebooks}}

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* FinalDungeonPreview \\
The player pays an early visit to what will be the game's final dungeon.


* AnAdventurerIsYou \\
A description of the class-based systems common to many Role Playing Games.



* AnAdventurerIsYou \\
A description of the class-based systems common to many Role Playing Games.
* AHomeownerIsYou \\
You get to buy a house, basically just because.


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* AHomeownerIsYou \\
You get to buy a house, basically just because.


** '''{{Dungeon Crawl|ing}}ers''' focus on [[RPGsEqualCombat fighting, looting, and grinding]], with [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory little interest in the story or world exploration]]. The earliest Western [=RPGs=] fell into this pattern. ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' and the earlier ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' installments [[TropeCodifier codified]] the pattern. They are conceptually related to ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'' and [[{{Roguelike}} the genre it spawned]] (see below). This sub-genre had gone out of favor during TheNineties, and only the ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' series and its many clones still carry its tradition.

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** '''{{Dungeon Crawl|ing}}ers''' focus on [[RPGsEqualCombat fighting, looting, and grinding]], with [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory little interest in the story or world exploration]]. The earliest Western [=RPGs=] fell into this pattern. pattern, [[TropeCodifier codified]] by ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' and the earlier ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' installments [[TropeCodifier codified]] the pattern. They are ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}''. It is conceptually related to ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'' and [[{{Roguelike}} the genre it spawned]] (see below). This sub-genre had gone out of favor during TheNineties, and only the ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' series and its many clones still carry its tradition.


Let's keep the CrowningMusicOfAwesome going through this sequence's battles instead of the BattleThemeMusic.

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Let's keep the CrowningMusicOfAwesome SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic going through this sequence's battles instead of the BattleThemeMusic.


{{RPG}}s have their origin in [[TabletopGames pen-and-paper systems]] which traditionally have UsefulNotes/{{dice}}-based combat and character generation, descended from a combination of tabletop wargaming and collaborative theater. ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' was the first such system to be sold, followed by other early systems such as ''TabletopGame/TheFantasyTrip'', SpaceOpera RPG ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' and ''TabletopGame/TunnelsAndTrolls''. These type of role-playing games are now known as {{Tabletop RPG}}s.

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{{RPG}}s have their origin in [[TabletopGames pen-and-paper systems]] which traditionally have UsefulNotes/{{dice}}-based combat and character generation, descended from a combination of tabletop wargaming WarGaming (such as TabletopGame/{{Chess}} and TabletopGame/{{Go}}) and collaborative theater. ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' was the first such system to be sold, followed by other early systems such as ''TabletopGame/EmpireOfThePetalThrone'', ''TabletopGame/TheFantasyTrip'', SpaceOpera RPG ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' and ''TabletopGame/TunnelsAndTrolls''. These type of role-playing games are now known as {{Tabletop RPG}}s.



* '''{{Western RPG}}s ([=WRPGs=])''' often focus on greater CharacterCustomization and free-roaming exploration. {{Player Character}}s tend not to have a predefined personality, allowing the players to determine their characterization via [[KeywordsConversation interactive]] {{dialogue|Tree}}. Western [=RPGs=] traditionally bore a resemblance to {{Tabletop RPG}}s, TurnBasedStrategy, and Tactical [=RPGs=] thanks to their roots in WarGaming, but many modern examples use real-time combat, while deemphasizing [[CommonTacticalGameplayElements tactical control]] of the PlayerParty, which is often [[ManualLeaderAIParty delegated to the AI]]. Western [=RPGs=] come in three main flavors, though hybrids are also common.

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* '''{{Western RPG}}s ([=WRPGs=])''' often focus on greater CharacterCustomization and free-roaming exploration. {{Player Character}}s tend not to have a predefined personality, allowing the players to determine their characterization via [[KeywordsConversation interactive]] {{dialogue|Tree}}. Western [=RPGs=] traditionally bore a resemblance to turn-based {{Tabletop RPG}}s, TurnBasedStrategy, and Tactical [=RPGs=] thanks to their roots in WarGaming, with many also having tactical WarGaming elements, but many modern examples use real-time combat, while deemphasizing [[CommonTacticalGameplayElements tactical control]] of the PlayerParty, which is often [[ManualLeaderAIParty delegated to the AI]]. Western [=RPGs=] come in three main flavors, though hybrids are also common.



** '''{{Tactical RPG}}s''' are related to Light [=RPGs=] but with a focus on moving around a gridlike system, often with abilities that take advantage of this to strike multiple enemies at the same time or to fight from a distance [[note]]In Western [=RPGs=] this type of tactical combat is typical, thanks to their wargaming roots[[/note]]. However, what separates the Tactical RPG subgenre from other [=RPGs=] is that they tend to greatly resemble {{Strategy Game}}s, but with RPGElements. On Wiki/TVTropes, this type of game is thus lumped in with TurnBasedStrategy, as the two genres are very close. More recent examples of Eastern Tactical [=RPGs=], however, have also incorporated RealTimeStrategy elements. (Tactical [=RPGs=], however, can usually be distinguished easily from strategy games, as RealTimeStrategy and TurnBasedStrategy games tend to be much more open ended, and about conquering territory, whereas Tactical [=RPGs=] usually have an overarching plot typical to an Light [=RPG=].)

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** '''{{Tactical RPG}}s''' are related to Light [=RPGs=] but with a focus on moving around a gridlike system, often with abilities that take advantage of this to strike multiple enemies at the same time or to fight from a distance [[note]]In distance. While there are also Western [=RPGs=] this type of with wargaming-like tactical combat is typical, thanks to their wargaming roots[[/note]]. However, combat, what separates the Tactical RPG subgenre from other [=RPGs=] is that they tend to greatly resemble {{Strategy Game}}s, but with RPGElements. On Wiki/TVTropes, this type of game is thus lumped in with TurnBasedStrategy, as the two genres are very close. More recent examples of Eastern Tactical [=RPGs=], however, have also incorporated RealTimeStrategy elements. (Tactical [=RPGs=], however, can usually be distinguished easily from strategy games, as RealTimeStrategy and TurnBasedStrategy games tend to be much more open ended, and about conquering territory, whereas Tactical [=RPGs=] usually have an overarching plot typical to an Light [=RPG=].)

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