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* It is possible to run out of starship fuel in ''VideoGame/MassEffect2''. It's not instantly fatal, as you can expend other resources to get you to the nearest star port. But if you run out of fuel ''and'' resources you can't move and the game is over. Fortunately, this is so hard to do you basically have to try to do it in order to pull it off.

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* It is possible to run out of starship fuel in ''VideoGame/MassEffect2''. It's not instantly fatal, as you can expend other resources to get you to the nearest star port. But if you run out of fuel ''and'' resources you can't move and the game is over. Fortunately, this is so hard to do you [[UnwinnableByInsanity basically have to try to do it in order to pull it off.
off.]]


* ''FireEmblem'' games. You can't repeat battles, and the items you have are the ones you'll use in next battle, so not wasting your equipment is crucial for progress. Many of the games tend to give heaps of gold on an irregular and [[GuideDangIt unpredictable]] basis, so you can end up with no gold for several chapters if you spend it all too early.

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* ''FireEmblem'' ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games. You can't repeat battles, and the items you have are the ones you'll use in next battle, so not wasting your equipment is crucial for progress. Many of the games tend to give heaps of gold on an irregular and [[GuideDangIt unpredictable]] basis, so you can end up with no gold for several chapters if you spend it all too early.


-> ''Itís important that you grind. But with no Inns, how are you supposed to heal? Tonics are found through the mansion, and automatically heal everyone in your party 100% regardless of your levels. That may sound too convenient, but remember, you canít buy tonics. Youíve to ration the handful littered throughout the whole mansion.''
--> ''WebVideo/TheHappyVideoGameNerd, during his review of ''VideoGame/SweetHome'' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNz93wC7W68&t=2m37s here]]''

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-> ''Itís ->''Itís important that you grind. But with no Inns, how are you supposed to heal? Tonics are found through the mansion, and automatically heal everyone in your party 100% regardless of your levels. That may sound too convenient, but remember, you canít buy tonics. Youíve to ration the handful littered throughout the whole mansion.''
--> -->-- ''WebVideo/TheHappyVideoGameNerd, during his review of ''VideoGame/SweetHome'' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNz93wC7W68&t=2m37s here]]''


* ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys1'' has electricity. You start at 99%, and it drains constantly throughout the night, although it drains faster when you have the lights on or the doors closed. You need to make it from midnight to 6AM. If the power runs out, the robots kill you. If you run out of power between 5 and 6AM, you ''might'' be able to survive by PlayingPossum - [[spoiler: Freddy always shows up in person for power outages, and spends nearly a minute (an in-game hour) celebrating with a creepy song.]]


* This is the whole basis of ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys''. You are being stalked by hostile animatronics. You can't leave your station, but you can check their locations with your camera tablet, use door lights to check if they're right outside your door, and shut the doors to prevent them from getting through. However, when the defenses are active, they drain power, and you only have a finite amount (which already drains slowly because of your office lights and fans). When the power runs out, [[BigBad Freddy]] ''will'' kill you, unless you're just on the edge of the clock flipping to [[InstantWinCondition 6 AM]].



* This is the whole basis of ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys''. You are being stalked by hostile animatronics. You can't leave your station, but you can check their locations with your camera tablet, use door lights to check if they're right outside your door, and shut the doors to prevent them from getting through. However, when the defenses are active, they drain power, and you only have a finite amount (which already drains slowly because of your office lights and fans). When the power runs out, [[BigBad Freddy]] ''will'' kill you, unless you're just on the edge of the clock flipping to [[InstantWinCondition 6 AM]].

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* This is In the whole basis same vein as ''Sheltered'' above, there's ''VideoGame/SixtySeconds''. At the beginning of ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys''. You are being stalked by hostile animatronics. You can't leave your station, but the game, you have 60 seconds to grab all the supplies (and family members) you can check their locations with your camera tablet, use door lights to check if they're right outside your door, and shut take them to the doors to bunker. After that comes the hard part- surviving until you can be rescued. Supplies can be replenished by scavenging or random events, but they can also be destroyed. Going without food or water for too long will kill family members, and lack of important items can make them get sick, go insane, or prevent them you from getting through. However, when the defenses are active, they drain power, and you only have a finite amount (which already drains slowly because of your office lights and fans). When the power runs out, [[BigBad Freddy]] ''will'' kill you, unless you're just on the edge of the clock flipping to [[InstantWinCondition 6 AM]].reaching an ending.

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* This is the whole basis of ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys''. You are being stalked by hostile animatronics. You can't leave your station, but you can check their locations with your camera tablet, use door lights to check if they're right outside your door, and shut the doors to prevent them from getting through. However, when the defenses are active, they drain power, and you only have a finite amount (which already drains slowly because of your office lights and fans). When the power runs out, [[BigBad Freddy]] ''will'' kill you, unless you're just on the edge of the clock flipping to [[InstantWinCondition 6 AM]].


* The first ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' game, ''Codename 47'', involved a pre-mission menu that also allowed the player to buy extra ammo and other smaller equipment, in addition to selecting the equipment for a mission.

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* The first ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' game, ''Codename 47'', involved ''VideoGame/HitmanCodename47'', involves a pre-mission menu that also allowed allows the player to buy extra ammo and other smaller equipment, in addition to selecting the equipment for a mission.



* ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' has electricity. You start at 99%, and it drains constantly throughout the night, although it drains faster when you have the lights on or the doors closed. You need to make it from midnight to 6AM. If the power runs out, the robots kill you. If you run out of power between 5 and 6AM, you ''might'' be able to survive by PlayingPossum - [[spoiler: Freddy always shows up in person for power outages, and spends nearly a minute (an in-game hour) celebrating with a creepy song.]]

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* ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys'' ''VideoGame/FiveNightsAtFreddys1'' has electricity. You start at 99%, and it drains constantly throughout the night, although it drains faster when you have the lights on or the doors closed. You need to make it from midnight to 6AM. If the power runs out, the robots kill you. If you run out of power between 5 and 6AM, you ''might'' be able to survive by PlayingPossum - [[spoiler: Freddy always shows up in person for power outages, and spends nearly a minute (an in-game hour) celebrating with a creepy song.]]


* The trope is parodied in one strip of ''VG Cats'', where Cloud will not even spend one of his inn coupons[[note]]Not only are inn coupons useless for anything else, but even without them, it hardly costs anything to stay at an inn[[/note]] to heal a badly wounded party.
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' integrates this and other WesternRPG [[RPGElements Elements]] into the greater ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series. From the beginning, you have to scrounge around for melee weapons, bows, food, and little animals to make potions with. Since all weapons break easily, you need to continuously find new weapons to replace them, and the sheer amount of food items you can find and make is balanced out by the damage that later enemies do. You even need to manage your "experience" in the form of the Spirit Orbs, as you can cash in four of them for a HeartContainer or a Stamina upgrade, though there is a character who can exchange one for the other.
** Although the game integrates resource management to a much greater level than any previous game in the series, there are no truly limited resources: weapons and monsters respawn periodically with the Blood Moon. However, the Trial of the Sword, available by DLC, plays it completely straight: there are a series of rooms with fixed contents, and no gear or items can be brought in from outside. If the player fails to use the environment to their greatest advantage, the Trial can become unbeatable.

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* The trope is parodied in one strip of ''VG Cats'', where Cloud will not even spend one of his inn coupons[[note]]Not only are inn coupons useless for anything else, but even without them, it hardly costs anything to stay at an inn[[/note]] to heal a badly wounded party.
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' integrates this and other WesternRPG [[RPGElements Elements]] into the greater ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series. From the beginning, you have to scrounge around for melee weapons, bows, food, and little animals to make potions with. Since all weapons break easily, you need to continuously find new weapons to replace them, and the sheer amount of food items you can find and make is balanced out by the damage that later enemies do. You even need to manage your "experience" in the form of the Spirit Orbs, as you can cash in four of them for a HeartContainer or a Stamina upgrade, though there is a character who can exchange one for the other.
** Although the game integrates resource management to a much greater level than any previous game in the series, there are no truly limited resources: weapons and monsters respawn periodically with the Blood Moon. However, the Trial of the Sword, available by DLC, plays it completely straight: there are a series of rooms with fixed contents, and no gear or items can be brought in from outside. If the player fails to use the environment to their greatest advantage, the Trial can become unbeatable.



* The main resources to manage in the ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis'' series include finances, manpower available for recruitment, and various diplomatic statistics.


[[caption-width-right:244:But what if [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade you're]] bleeding to death moreso later?]]

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[[caption-width-right:244:But [[caption-width-right:244:[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade But what if [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade you're]] you're bleeding to death moreso later?]]
later?]]]]



* A staple in Creator/FrictionalGames' survival horrors, but not without subversions.

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* A staple in Creator/FrictionalGames' survival horrors, but not without subversions.horrors:



** ''VideoGame/AmnesiaTheDarkDescent'' has lantern oil [[CaptainObvious for your lantern]] (similar to Penumbra's batteries for the flashlight), and tinderboxes for lighting candles, lamps, static lanterns and other light sources strewn across the environment. Without light, your SanityMeter drops rapidly. The healing item stand-ins for the previous painkillers are, appropriately enough for the period, vials of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laudanum Laudanum]].
** ''VideoGame/{{SOMA}}'' is more of a subversion, due to its even greater focus on exploration and narrative than the earlier titles. While you still need to keep an eye out on replenishing your health regularly and you're frequently searching for clues and solving puzzles, you're not rationing items, [[InfiniteFlashlight always have a light source]], and you have a diegetic-only inventory.

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** ''VideoGame/AmnesiaTheDarkDescent'' has lantern oil [[CaptainObvious for your lantern]] lantern (similar to Penumbra's batteries for the flashlight), and tinderboxes for lighting candles, lamps, static lanterns and other light sources strewn across the environment. Without light, your SanityMeter drops rapidly. The healing item stand-ins for the previous painkillers are, appropriately enough for the period, vials of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laudanum Laudanum]].
** ''VideoGame/{{SOMA}}'' is more of a subversion, due to its even greater focus on exploration and narrative than the earlier titles. While you still need to keep an eye out on replenishing your health regularly and you're frequently searching for clues and solving puzzles, you're not rationing items, [[InfiniteFlashlight always have a light source]], and you have a diegetic-only inventory.
Laudanum]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Sheltered}}'' is about a family trying to survive as long as they can in a fallout shelter immediately following a nuclear war. Supplies scarce and they need to go out into the wasteland to find more.

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* The old Avalon Hill boardgame ''Third Reich'' takes place at the corps level and is quite abstract. Attacking is very expensive. A 2:1 attack succeeds about 97.5% of the time (3:1 always succeeds) and the die roll is used to determine the casualties. Defending ground units get terrain multipliers so 2:1 is usually closer to 4:1. Managing your resources and supply lines is a huge (and very boring) part of the game.


* The later ''VideoGame/BattleTech'' video game requires the player to manage heat in battle, similar to the source material. Generate too much heat in battle without being able to vent it via heat sinks, and your 'Mech will start malfunctioning and either shut down (or, in a worst case scenario, explode catastrophically). This makes ''heat dispersal'' the valuable resource that has to be managed on a per-unit basis. You also need to pay for and ration out your available reserves of medical care and technical support, ensuring you have enough of both to recover and repair damaged units and heal injured warriors in anything less than two months.

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* The later ''VideoGame/BattleTech'' video game requires the player to manage heat in battle, similar to the source material. Generate too much heat in battle without being able to vent it via heat sinks, and your 'Mech will start malfunctioning and either shut down (or, in a worst case scenario, explode catastrophically). This makes ''heat dispersal'' the valuable resource that has to be managed on a per-unit basis. You also need to pay for and ration out your available reserves of medical care and technical support, ensuring you have enough of both to recover and repair damaged units and heal injured warriors in anything less than two months. On top of that, you also have to manage your unit's morale and standing with various benefactors; don't expect a warm welcome if you show up on House Liao's doorstep after shooting up their Capellan Home Guards.

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* The later ''VideoGame/BattleTech'' video game requires the player to manage heat in battle, similar to the source material. Generate too much heat in battle without being able to vent it via heat sinks, and your 'Mech will start malfunctioning and either shut down (or, in a worst case scenario, explode catastrophically). This makes ''heat dispersal'' the valuable resource that has to be managed on a per-unit basis. You also need to pay for and ration out your available reserves of medical care and technical support, ensuring you have enough of both to recover and repair damaged units and heal injured warriors in anything less than two months.

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* ''VideoGame/CultistSimulator'' requires you to ensure a constant supply of money, so as to pay for both ongoing survival, recovering from injuries ''and'' a string of [[TomeOfEldritchLore sinister tomes]].


* In the ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' series, you have to manage the health, morale and income of both your character and his band of companions and adventurers. Availability and variety of food, how well you handle battles or diplomacy with rivals, and how much you regularly pay your companions (the better the soldier, the higher the wage) all factors into troop morale. Additionally, there's also the matter of buying or acquiring better mounts, armour and weaponry throghout the course of the game, as you start alone and [[WithThisHerring with humble equipment]]. Though the vanilla games and most of their mods simply use universal currency for recruitment, payments and rewards, some mods play around with making this more complex. For example, a well-regarded mod about the [[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings War of the Ring]] replaced the currency with "resource points", which the player had to earn separately from each of the many factions present in the mod to purchase or recruit within their territory.

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* In the ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'' series, you have to manage the health, morale and income of both your character and his band of companions and adventurers. Availability and variety of food, how well you handle battles or diplomacy with rivals, and how much you regularly pay your companions (the better the soldier, the higher the wage) all factors into troop morale. Additionally, there's also the matter of buying or acquiring better mounts, armour and weaponry throghout throughout the course of the game, as you start alone and [[WithThisHerring with humble equipment]]. Though the vanilla games and most of their mods simply use universal currency for recruitment, payments and rewards, some mods play around with making this more complex. For example, a well-regarded mod about the [[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings War of the Ring]] replaced the currency with "resource points", which the player had to earn separately from each of the many factions present in the mod to purchase or recruit within their territory.



* The ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' series offers you a lot of resource management, including food and medical items, ammunition, weapon parts, and most impressively of all, cybernetic implant modules and other software (which you can use to improve your abilities, or for accessing devices and hacking). The initial version of the second game was somewhat infamous for overdoing it with [[BreakableWeapons quickly-weathering firearms]]. Due to all the games' heavily RPG-esque approach and {{cyberpunk}}-based items, they are something of a precussor to the first ''Deus Ex'' game, which built on their ideas.

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* The ''VideoGame/SystemShock'' series offers you a lot of resource management, including food and medical items, ammunition, weapon parts, and most impressively of all, cybernetic implant modules and other software (which you can use to improve your abilities, or for accessing devices and hacking). The initial version of the second game was somewhat infamous for overdoing it with [[BreakableWeapons quickly-weathering firearms]]. Due to all the games' heavily RPG-esque approach and {{cyberpunk}}-based items, they are something of a precussor precursor to the first ''Deus Ex'' game, which built on their ideas.



** The episodically published ''VideoGame/{{Penumbra}}'' series has packets of painkillers as healing items and the battery life of your flashlight (luckily, you can find replacement batteries fairly regularly, if you look around). Your other light source is a glowstick which never runs out, but it's weak for illuminating larger distances. The opening episode, ''Overture'', also has the occassional packet of food supplies, the contents of which you can throw to lure away certain enemies. The sequel, ''Black Plague'', was somewhat criticised for [[TenSecondFlashlight nerfing the battery life]] of the flashlight quite a bit, forcing you to replace batteries more often (though that also adds to the tension and loneliness).

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** The episodically published ''VideoGame/{{Penumbra}}'' series has packets of painkillers as healing items and the battery life of your flashlight (luckily, you can find replacement batteries fairly regularly, if you look around). Your other light source is a glowstick which never runs out, but it's weak for illuminating larger distances. The opening episode, ''Overture'', also has the occassional occasional packet of food supplies, the contents of which you can throw to lure away certain enemies. The sequel, ''Black Plague'', was somewhat criticised for [[TenSecondFlashlight nerfing the battery life]] of the flashlight quite a bit, forcing you to replace batteries more often (though that also adds to the tension and loneliness).



* ''VideoGame/SirYouAreBeingHunted'' makes being tracked by mustachioed, tweed-clad robots that much harder by limiting you to whatever you can scavenge and fit inside your grid. Rifles and shotguns in particular can really mess up your tetris game.

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* ''VideoGame/SirYouAreBeingHunted'' makes being tracked by mustachioed, tweed-clad robots that much harder by limiting you to whatever you can scavenge and fit inside your grid. Rifles and shotguns in particular can really mess up your tetris Tetris game.



* ''VideoGame/UnrealWorld'' is an open-world roguelike set in a land based on prehistoric, Iron Age Finland. The primary goal is to simply survive throughout the calendar year, and one can go about it in numerous ways. The game is strongly management-focused, with the player regularly needing to eat, drink, rest and sleep, nad avoid overheating, hypothermia or catching diseases. Additionally, every tool and structure needs to be built from gathered resources. Resource gathering itself can often take a while, especially if there's a need for larger quantities of building materials (e.g. for building a log cabin) or rarer, special materials (e.g. quality leather, as a tying/binding implement) and certain crops (both wild and agricultural plants follow seasonal cycles, so you can't just pick them whenever you want). Outside of exploring to find new natural resources for everyday life, the player can also barter with {{NPC}}s from established settlements and existing tribes.

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* ''VideoGame/UnrealWorld'' is an open-world roguelike set in a land based on prehistoric, Iron Age Finland. The primary goal is to simply survive throughout the calendar year, and one can go about it in numerous ways. The game is strongly management-focused, with the player regularly needing to eat, drink, rest and sleep, nad and avoid overheating, hypothermia or catching diseases. Additionally, every tool and structure needs to be built from gathered resources. Resource gathering itself can often take a while, especially if there's a need for larger quantities of building materials (e.g. for building a log cabin) or rarer, special materials (e.g. quality leather, as a tying/binding implement) and certain crops (both wild and agricultural plants follow seasonal cycles, so you can't just pick them whenever you want). Outside of exploring to find new natural resources for everyday life, the player can also barter with {{NPC}}s from established settlements and existing tribes.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Caesar}}'' series, by the same developers as ''Pharaoh'', has very similar resource-and-distribution management. Due to the ancient Roman setting, this includes building reservoirs and aquaducts for supplying cities with water, and so on.

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Caesar}}'' series, by the same developers as ''Pharaoh'', has very similar resource-and-distribution management. Due to the ancient Roman setting, this includes building reservoirs and aquaducts aqueducts for supplying cities with water, and so on.

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