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* Parodied in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'', where a policeman is driving down the road and hears an utterly unintelligible static-choked mumble from his radio. The policeman picks up the handset and talks into it in an equally meaningless [[{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]]-esque mumble, revealing that it's not actually radio interference--in this world, cops just talk like that. Both sides can apparently understand each other perfectly.

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* Parodied in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'', where a policeman is driving down the road and hears an utterly unintelligible static-choked mumble from his radio. The policeman picks up the handset and talks into it in an equally meaningless [[{{Peanuts}} [[Franchise/{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]]-esque mumble, revealing that it's not actually radio interference--in this world, cops just talk like that. Both sides can apparently understand each other perfectly.


* ''Film/{{THX 1138}}''.

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%% * ''Film/{{THX 1138}}''.

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* In ''WebAnimation/HazbinHotel'', Alastor, befitting his title as the "Radio Demon" and role in life as a radio show host from the 30s, sounds like he's talking on the radio even in person.

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* Most of Music/MikeOldfield's ''Five Miles Out'' is sung through a vocoder. The song is about a plane getting in trouble in a storm.


This may be simply to serve the RuleOfPerception, because otherwise we might get confused as to who's where. It also has a good technical reason: transmitting only 3 kHz worth of audio is far easier than transmitting 20 kHz regardless of what transmission medium or method is being used, and it's OK to do this when the only thing that matters is the speech itself and not so much the audio quality. This may also be explainable in-Verse as a user interface feature; the fictional designers of the fictional system may have felt it was useful to be able to distinguish radio voices from the voices of people present in the room.

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This may be simply to serve the RuleOfPerception, because otherwise we might get confused as to who's where. It also has a good technical reason: per the laws of mathematics and signal analysis, transmitting only 3 kHz worth of audio is always far easier than transmitting 20 kHz regardless of what transmission medium or method is being used, and it's OK to do this when the only thing that matters is the speech itself and not so much the audio quality. This may also be explainable in-Verse as a user interface feature; the fictional designers of the fictional system may have felt it was useful to be able to distinguish radio voices from the voices of people present in the room.


* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' may be an instance in which [[JustifiedTrope this trope is justified]]; except for having artificial gravity and the jump drive (which is, admittedly, a ''big'' "except"), their tech isn't any more advanced than real life.
** The old BSG (iirc) and ''Franchise/StarWars''' Rebel Alliance fighters (definitely) had the same effect for their military radio comms. It's a close simulation of the actual sound of single sideband radio, as still used by ham operators today, and military voice comms a few decades ago. Besides the "telephone filter" there is a slight, and changing, pitch shift. Note too that the new BSG calls it "wireless," not "radio," and that their "civilian" radio does not have the SSB effect. Speaking of new BSG tech, while they have computers (with image enhancement software) they don't seem to have television. Hm, maybe the latter explains how they had time to invent jump drives and artificial gravity!
*** Hmm. It seems that in Series/{{Caprica}}'s time, when they invented the Cylons, they ''did'' have television. "'Curiouser and curiouser,' said Alice."
*** Television was present on the twelve colonies (Baltar did an interview just before the original attack). Its likely that after the attack and while on the run, there were just no adequate facilities for a TV production and/or there weren't a lot of [=TVs=] that were brought along anyway.
*** They did have televisions in the fleet. An entire episode is devoted to the making of a documentary about the Galactica's pilots. We just don't ever see people sitting around watching television, justified in that all of the characters in that show were routinely pretty busy.
* Used in the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "Silence in the Library"/"Forest of the Dead", when Charlotte watches what's going on on the TV. Particularly notable because [[SorryILeftTheBGMOn the background music]] is similarly treated, suggesting her observation of the library comes with its own chase-scene music.
** This may be justified since [[spoiler: she is the main computer in the library and she is subconsciously controlling everything]] and since it's a chase seen on the TV it should have chase music.

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* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' may be an instance in which [[JustifiedTrope this trope is justified]]; except for having artificial gravity and the jump drive (which is, admittedly, a ''big'' "except"), their tech isn't any more advanced than real life.
**
life. It's with noting that their civilian radios, having a greater emphasis on fidelity, don't sound nearly as bad as their military comms.
*
The old BSG (iirc) and original ''Series/BattlestarGalactica1978'' also featured this effect in inter-ship communications.
*
''Franchise/StarWars''' Rebel Alliance fighters (definitely) had the same effect for their military radio comms.radios. It's a close simulation of the actual sound of single sideband radio, as still used by ham operators today, and military voice comms a few decades ago. Besides the "telephone filter" there is a slight, and changing, pitch shift. Note too that the new BSG calls it "wireless," not "radio," and that their "civilian" radio does not have the SSB effect. Speaking of new BSG tech, while they have computers (with image enhancement software) they don't seem to have television. Hm, maybe the latter explains how they had time to invent jump drives and artificial gravity!
*** Hmm. It seems that in Series/{{Caprica}}'s time, when they invented the Cylons, they ''did'' have television. "'Curiouser and curiouser,' said Alice."
*** Television was present on the twelve colonies (Baltar did an interview just before the original attack). Its likely that after the attack and while on the run, there were just no adequate facilities for a TV production and/or there weren't a lot of [=TVs=] that were brought along anyway.
*** They did have televisions in the fleet. An entire episode is devoted to the making of a documentary about the Galactica's pilots. We just don't ever see people sitting around watching television, justified in that all of the characters in that show were routinely pretty busy.
shift.
* Used in the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "Silence in the Library"/"Forest of the Dead", when Charlotte watches what's going on on the TV. Particularly notable because [[SorryILeftTheBGMOn the background music]] is similarly treated, suggesting her observation of accidentally had the library comes with its own chase-scene music.
** This may be justified since [[spoiler:
same treatment applied to it. ([[spoiler:Or maybe not so accidentally. It's actually a subtle hint that she is actually the main computer in the library and she is subconsciously controlling everything]] everything, and since it's a chase seen on the TV it should have chase music.]])


* Used in the ''StarWars'' movies, in particular the first movie with the attack on the Death Star, where the distortion was filtered through what sounded like a single sideband transmitter. The StarWarsExpandedUniverse suggested that this was at least somewhat deliberate on the part of the Rebellion, as it naturally disguised their voices (and being rebels, they would prefer to keep their identities unknown or at least plausibly deniable) and they'd rather use their limited bandwidth for things like better encryption, frequency hopping, etc than high fidelity. Though they say very little, the Imperial pilots' voices are significantly less distorted.

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* Used in the ''StarWars'' ''Franchise/StarWars'' movies, in particular the first movie with the attack on the Death Star, where the distortion was filtered through what sounded like a single sideband transmitter. The StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' suggested that this was at least somewhat deliberate on the part of the Rebellion, as it naturally disguised their voices (and being rebels, they would prefer to keep their identities unknown or at least plausibly deniable) and they'd rather use their limited bandwidth for things like better encryption, frequency hopping, etc than high fidelity. Though they say very little, the Imperial pilots' voices are significantly less distorted.


* Played straight in TheKingsSpeech, TruthInTelevision for its day.

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* Played straight in TheKingsSpeech, ''Film/TheKingsSpeech'', TruthInTelevision for its day.


* Several of Music/DoctorSteel's songs have epigraphs, some sampled from old Public Service Announcements such as "Duck and Cover", others deliberately done as a parody of such announcements.

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* Several of Music/DoctorSteel's songs have epigraphs, some sampled from old Public Service Announcements such as "Duck and Cover", "Film/DuckAndCover", others deliberately done as a parody of such announcements.

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* ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' and ''VideoGame/BorderlandsThePreSequel'' make good use of this trope to avoid a common RPG speedbump. If you walk away from someone who is delivering quest dialogue, it will crossfade to a bandpassed version that remains at a constant volume wherever you go. The characters automatically switch between Radio Voice and normal voice to stay audible.


* Parodied in ''Film/HighAnxiety'', when Mel Brooks asks his secretary to repeat her intercom message without holding her nose. She replies in a perfectly normal voice.
** Mel Books also parodied this trope in ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}''; specifically, the "jammed radar" scene featuring Creator/MichaelWinslow as the Spaceball manning the radar station. Dark Helmet also talks this way whenever his visor is down.

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* Parodied [[ParodiedTrope Parodied]] in ''Film/HighAnxiety'', when Mel Brooks two films by Creator/MelBrooks:
** ''Film/HighAnxiety'': When Thorndyke
asks his secretary to repeat her intercom message without holding her nose. She nose, she replies in a perfectly normal voice.
** Mel Books also parodied this trope in ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}''; specifically, the ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'': The "jammed radar" scene featuring Creator/MichaelWinslow as the Spaceball manning the radar station. Dark Helmet also talks this way whenever his visor is down.


'''Technician''': [[AC: Can I talk to you for a minute, sir?]]\\

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'''Technician''': [[AC: Can I talk to you for a minute, moment please, sir?]]\\

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* In Episode 1 of ''Podcast/TheOrbitingHumanCircusOfTheAir'' as a radio listener searches through stations and the eponymous radio VarietyShow opens, the "on-air" audio acquires a mildly tinny, distant quality, including protagonist Julian the Janitor's interruption and the ad break TheHost cuts to as a result. Throughout, Julian's personal InteractiveNarrator recounts the proceedings in clearer tones, including Julian's forcible removal from the stage and its concealment from listeners by the ad break.


* Musical example; on Pink Floyd's ''Music/WishYouWereHere'' album, the end of the song "Have A Cigar" is distorted to sound as though it's playing on the radio. This leads into a sequence where the radio is tuned through several channels rapidly before settling on the opening riff of the title track. Eventually, a second guitar joins in undistorted, symbolising the listener (ex-frontman Music/SydBarrett) playing his own guitar along with the radio.

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* Musical example; on Pink Floyd's Music/PinkFloyd's ''Music/WishYouWereHere'' album, the end of the song "Have A Cigar" is distorted to sound as though it's playing on the radio. This leads into a sequence where the radio is tuned through several channels rapidly before settling on the opening riff of the title track. Eventually, a second guitar joins in undistorted, symbolising the listener (ex-frontman Music/SydBarrett) playing his own guitar along with the radio.



* In the song "Patterns" by Simon and Garfunkel. After "The pattern never alters, until..", "The rat dies" is heard in Radio Voice.
* Several of DoctorSteel's songs have epigraphs, some sampled from old Public Service Announcements such as "Duck and Cover", others deliberately done as a parody of such announcements.

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* In the song "Patterns" by Simon and Garfunkel.Music/SimonAndGarfunkel. After "The pattern never alters, until..", "The rat dies" is heard in Radio Voice.
* Several of DoctorSteel's Music/DoctorSteel's songs have epigraphs, some sampled from old Public Service Announcements such as "Duck and Cover", others deliberately done as a parody of such announcements.

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* ''Series/TheGoodies''. When Bill and Tim are sent on a rocket to the Moon, they keep saying "beep!" at the end of every sentence while communicating with Graham at MissionControl, to imitate the [[http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/quindar.html Quindar tones]].

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