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* The [=IOS=] port of ''VideoGame/KingOfDragonPass'' fixed outstanding bugs and streamlined some of the more finicky areas of the game. This version also adds a number of new scenes including a recurring character and potential ring member, Theya the [[Seer]]. Notably, this version was also ported ''back'' to [=PC=] and Mac; the version for sale on Steam is a re-port of the [=IOS=] game, rather than the original.


* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' and [[VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2 its sequel]] got a CompilationRerelease for the [=PlayStation=] Vita called ''Danganronpa 1x2 RELOAD'', featuring better graphics, touch controls, and a "School Mode" for the first game (based on the Island Mode of the second, which was in the original release). The first game's rerelease was brought over to the West in this form.

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* ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' ''VisualNovel/DanganronpaTriggerHappyHavoc'' and [[VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2 its sequel]] got a CompilationRerelease for the [=PlayStation=] Vita called ''Danganronpa 1x2 RELOAD'', featuring better graphics, touch controls, and a "School Mode" for the first game (based on the Island Mode of the second, which was in the original release). The first game's rerelease was brought over to the West in this form.


* The Wii U Virtual Console version of ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'' is made ten times better with [[SaveScumming Restore Points]]. Restore points significantly cut down on the wasted time and frustration on certain challenges in the game, making OneHundredPercentCompletion a lot more bearable and quite fun.

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* ''Franchise/DonkeyKong'':
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The Wii U Virtual Console version of ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'' is made ten times better with [[SaveScumming Restore Points]]. Restore points significantly cut down on the wasted time and frustration on certain challenges in the game, making OneHundredPercentCompletion a lot more bearable and quite fun.fun.
** Logistics surrounding how the release was handled aside, the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch version of ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryTropicalFreeze'' is the defnitive way to play the game, thanks to 1080p visuals and significantly improved load times. The new Funky Mode added to lower the difficulty also helps players frustrated by the difficulty enjoy the game more, but the technical improvements alone make it qualify for this.


In the case of emulators, the ''entire console itself'' is essentially ported to another platform. While emulation usually introduces problems of its own (such as requiring the host system to be several times more powerful than the original), it can also improve upon the performance of the original console's hardware. For consoles that originally used optical media, the use of virtual drives can reduce load times dramatically. Modern [[UsefulNotes/GraphicsProcessingUnit GPUs]] can easily outperform those of the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation, which means that emulation for their games can be rendered in much higher resolutions than the original consoles were capable of. Save states can even be used to bypass SaveGameLimits. Of course, emulation itself (barring official examples such as the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole and [=PlayStation=] Classics) is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement a pretty controversial subject,]] and while emulators themselves are perfectly legal, the ownership and use of downloaded [=ROMs=], ISO files, [=BIOSes=], etc. are a rather murky gray area.

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In the case of emulators, the ''entire console itself'' is essentially ported to another platform. While emulation usually introduces problems of its own (such as requiring the host system to be several times more powerful than the original), it can also improve upon the performance of the original console's hardware. For consoles that originally used optical media, the use of virtual drives can reduce load times dramatically. Modern [[UsefulNotes/GraphicsProcessingUnit GPUs]] can easily outperform those of the UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation, which means that emulation for their games can be rendered in much higher resolutions than the original consoles were capable of. Save states can even be used to bypass SaveGameLimits. Of course, emulation itself (barring official examples such as the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole and [=PlayStation=] Classics) is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement a pretty controversial subject,]] and while emulators themselves are perfectly legal, the ownership and use of downloaded [=ROMs=], ISO files, [=BIOSes=], etc. are a rather murky gray area.


** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to practice in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (The Original arcade version, the Creator/{{Basiscape}} arrange made for the Xbox 360 port, the Creator/{{Virt}} arrange made for [[VideoGame/DonPachi DoDonPachi DaiFukkatsu Black Label]]'s Ketsui ArrangeMode, and a completely new arrange by Daisuke Matsumoto).

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** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to practice in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (The Original arcade version, the Creator/{{Basiscape}} arrange made for the Xbox 360 port, the Creator/{{Virt}} arrange made for [[VideoGame/DonPachi DoDonPachi DaiFukkatsu Black Label]]'s Ketsui ArrangeMode, and a completely new arrange by Daisuke Matsumoto).


%%** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to practice in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (Original, Basiscape arrange, D. Matsumoto arrange, and Virt arrange).

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%%** ** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to practice in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (Original, Basiscape arrange, D. Matsumoto arrange, (The Original arcade version, the Creator/{{Basiscape}} arrange made for the Xbox 360 port, the Creator/{{Virt}} arrange made for [[VideoGame/DonPachi DoDonPachi DaiFukkatsu Black Label]]'s Ketsui ArrangeMode, and Virt arrange).a completely new arrange by Daisuke Matsumoto).

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* The 2019 remaster of ''VideoGame/OnimushaWarlords'' features upgraded visuals, analog support alongside the original control scheme, the ability to swap weapons without pausing, a rerecorded soundtrack, and dual audio. Oh, and there's a previously censored cutscene now available.


* The SNES port of ''Chuck Rock'' has more colors, multi-layer parallax scrolling backgrounds, and additional sound effects over other versions.

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* The SNES port of ''Chuck Rock'' ''VideoGame/ChuckRock'' has more colors, multi-layer parallax scrolling backgrounds, and additional sound effects over other versions.


%%** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to fight in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (Original, Basiscape arrange, D. Matsumoto arrange, and Virt arrange).

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%%** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to fight practice in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (Original, Basiscape arrange, D. Matsumoto arrange, and Virt arrange).

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%%** After the port of VideoGame/BattleGaregga, M2 has done it again with "Ketsui Deathtiny", which is not only practically [[ArcadePerfectPort arcade-perfect]], but also adds in a "[[EasierThanEasy Super Easy]]" mode, an exclusive arrange mode in "Deathtiny", arcade challenges to fight in specific areas of stages, the 2007 IKD arrange previously only available for one day in a 2007 Cave festival, and a custom mode to mix and match these modes along with ''four'' soundtrack options (Original, Basiscape arrange, D. Matsumoto arrange, and Virt arrange).


** Like the SNES version, the Mega Drive version added background music, passwords, and upgraded graphics. It didn't have extra levels, but it had the most impressive graphics out of all ports, with gorgeous level art and lot of extra detail in the animations and level art.

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** Like the SNES version, the Mega Drive version added background music, passwords, and upgraded graphics. It didn't have extra levels, but it had the most impressive graphics out of all ports, with gorgeous level art and cutscenes, and a lot of extra detail in the animations and level art.


* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia'' on the SNES blew the original home computer ports out of the water, with incredibly good background music (most of the home computer versions had none!), improved graphics, and added levels. [[PortingDisaster The sequel, on the other hand, was farmed out to a much worse developer.]]

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* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia'' on the SNES blew the original home computer ports out of the water, with incredibly good background music (most of the home computer versions had none!), improved graphics, a password-based continue system, and added levels. [[PortingDisaster The sequel, on the other hand, was farmed out to a much worse developer.]]


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** Like the SNES version, the Mega Drive version added background music, passwords, and upgraded graphics. It didn't have extra levels, but it had the most impressive graphics out of all ports, with gorgeous level art and lot of extra detail in the animations and level art.

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** The versions of ''Mega Man X7'' and ''X8'' included in ''Mega Man X Legacy Collection 2'' saw some improvements, which drastically cut down the loading times from their previous [=PS2=] and PC releases, and bumps up the visuals to HD standards, giving these games better picture clarity. Unlike their previous PC releases, their ''Legacy Collection 2'' ports are also available internationally for [=PlayStation=] 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.


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** This series received mobile ports on [=iOS=], Android, and Amazon devices, which presents these games in higher resolutions, features an optional remixed track for their first stage (the Amazon versions also have one for their second stages as well), and touch controls that work beautifully for these games, but they have also been updated to support traditional bluetooth-supported controllers for those that prefer standard controls. This was also the first time that [=RayCrisis=] got a home port based off its arcade version, which has co-op multiplayer and seemless transitions between stages. However, due to being based of their arcade counterparts, these versions also lack the unlockables their console ports had, ''[=RayStorm=]'' does not have individual difficulty sliders for each level, and in the case of the Amazon versions, are lacking online leaderboards and achievements while ''[=RayCrisis=]'' has yet to see a release on Amazon devices.


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* ''VideoGame/{{sora}}'' was re-released through Steam by Fruitbat Factory in 2016, which not only gave this game a faithful English localization, it also gave the game some quality-of-life improvements such as high-resolution visuals, native keyboard remapping, and improved controller support. ''acceleration of SUGURI 2'' got a similar treatment in 2018 with full widescreen presentation and an online lobby system similarly to their overseas release of ''VideoGame/OneHundredPercentOrangeJuice''. Despite being released through Steam, these games are also DRM-agnostic, meaning they can be played without having to run and log into Steam's client to play them offline.


* The New [=3DS=] port of ''VideoGame/HyruleWarriors'', ''Hyrule Warriors Legends'', manages to pack in all of the missions of the original, plus all of the DLC characters and maps (with tweaks to specific missions and unlock placement to give it its own identity). In addition, the game adds new characters (including several fan favorites, like Skull Kid and Tetra) and a story mode for them, an indicator to show what subweapon can interrupt an enemy's attacks, and tweaks to the Giant Boss fights to make fighting them less onerous. The version on the old 3DS is a pretty problematic port however...

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* ''VideoGame/HyruleWarriors''
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The New [=3DS=] port of ''VideoGame/HyruleWarriors'', port, ''Hyrule Warriors Legends'', manages to pack in all of the missions of the original, plus all of the DLC characters and maps (with tweaks to specific missions and unlock placement to give it its own identity). In addition, the game adds new characters (including several fan favorites, like Skull Kid and Tetra) and a story mode for them, an indicator to show what subweapon can interrupt an enemy's attacks, and tweaks to the Giant Boss fights to make fighting them less onerous. The version on the old 3DS is a pretty problematic port however...however...
** The Switch port, subtitled ''Definitive Edition'', included the improvements of ''Legends'', took advantage of the hardware upgrade, and rebalanced Adventure Mode's grading system.


* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' games, in general, tend to get fairly solid ports.

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' games, in general, tend to get fairly solid ports.

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