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* The podrace from ''Film/StarWars: Episode I - Film/ThePhantomMenace'' is all over this trope. Sometimes Anakin passes other racers with ease, and other times he keeps pace with Sebulba over long straightaways. It also genuinely makes zero sense that he wasn't going as fast as he could to begin with, considering how he started the race in last place due to engine failure and his freedom was on the line. Explained in the spin-off videogame: The engines can't run at full power for very long before they begin to overheat, and once their temperature passes the redline they will ''very'' quickly seize up, catch fire or otherwise fail catastrophically.

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* The podrace from ''Film/StarWars: ''[[Film/ThePhantomMenace Star Wars: Episode I - Film/ThePhantomMenace'' The Phantom Menace]]'' is all over this trope. Sometimes Anakin passes other racers with ease, and other times he keeps pace with Sebulba over long straightaways. It also genuinely makes zero sense that he wasn't going as fast as he could to begin with, considering how he started the race in last place due to engine failure and his freedom was on the line. Explained in the spin-off videogame: The engines can't run at full power for very long before they begin to overheat, and once their temperature passes the redline they will ''very'' quickly seize up, catch fire or otherwise fail catastrophically.


* ''VideoGame/StarWarsEpisodeIRacer'' makes the engines overheat and burst into flames if Boost Mode is not turned off before too long, which can result in your engines deteriorating [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration (which nicely explains why Anakin wasn't boosting the whole time in the film)]]. And unless you pay for the rather expensive repairs, you'll start the next race with a half-broken engine. In the sequel, ''Revenge'', your engines won't catch fire anymore, but boosting while overheated will constantly damage your engines, leaving you vulnerable to being knocked out if you hit a wall or get attacked by another racer until you take time to repair the damage.

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* ''VideoGame/StarWarsEpisodeIRacer'' makes the engines overheat and burst into flames if Boost Mode is not turned off before too long, which can result in your engines deteriorating [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration (which nicely explains why Anakin wasn't boosting the whole time in the film)]]. And unless you pay for the rather expensive repairs, you'll start the next race with a half-broken engine. In the sequel, ''Revenge'', your engines won't catch fire anymore, but boosting while overheated will constantly damage your engines, leaving you vulnerable to being knocked out if you hit a wall or get attacked by another racer until you take time to repair the damage.damage, which often will cost you more speed than the prolonged boost gave you in the first place.



* The ''VideoGame/ArmoredCore'' series has Over Boost, which allows an [[HumongousMecha Armored Core]] to move much faster than normal by consuming enormous amounts of energy. Depending on the title, it may also overheat the AC or consume [[DeflectorShields Primal Armor]], leaving you nearly defenseless

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* The ''VideoGame/ArmoredCore'' series has Over Boost, which allows an [[HumongousMecha Armored Core]] to move much faster than normal by consuming enormous amounts of energy. Depending on the title, it may also overheat the AC or consume [[DeflectorShields Primal Armor]], leaving you nearly defenselesswith paper-thin defenses once you arrive at your destination.


* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'', where in one of his attempts to steal a Krabby Patty, Plankton shouts "You'll never catch me Krabs! Not after I shift into MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE!". [[Main/RealityEnsues Since his machine is about a foot tall]], [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments this doesn't even take him out of Krabs' arm range]].

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* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'', where in one of his attempts to steal a Krabby Patty, Plankton shouts "You'll never catch me Krabs! Not after I shift into MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE!". [[Main/RealityEnsues Since his machine is about a foot tall]], [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments this doesn't even take him out of Krabs' arm range]].range.

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Finally, it might be a matter of safety. Crashing and burning is not an effective way to reach a destination, and the driver may initially only be going as fast as they feel comfortable going... until they realize its not enough, and they just have to risk it.

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** Aerospace Fighters from the same game have Overthrust, which gives similar advantages and disadvantages to RealLife Afterburners. You can increase your speed 4-5 times over normal, but burn twice as much fuel and start rapidly heating up.

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* The ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Carpathia RMS Carpathia]]'' was a transatlantic passenger steam ship that responded to the ''[[USefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic's]]'' distress call shortly after midnight on April 15th, 1912. Captain Arthur Henry Rostron, who had been awakened by the ship's wireless operator with news of the distress call, ordered all engineers and engine strokers out of bed and on duty in order to "make all possible speed to the ''Titanic''" before he had the chance to get dressed. He then cut power to most of the ''Carpathia's'' heating and hot water facilities, diverting nearly all of the ship's steam output into the engines. While technically rated at 15.5 knots, ''Carpathia'' had not once exceeded a top speed of 14 knots since her shakedown cruise a decade before that fateful night. Dashing through the frigid Atlantic night towards the ''Titanic'' 58 nautical miles away, dodging ice and navigating [[https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/9158258/Titanic-sank-due-to-mirage-caused-by-freak-weather.html freak weather conditions]] that made the sea even more treacherous, the ''Carpathia'' reached a speed of 17.5 knots. She arrived at the last known location of the ''Titanic'' at 3:30 am on April 15th. Half an hour later, she found the first of the lifeboats. 705 of the ''Titanic's'' original 2,208 passengers were brought aboard the ''Carpathia''. No other ship would arrive in time to find survivors.


* In James Blish's ''Literature/CitiesInFlight'' novels, the cities of the title can fly at faster-than-light speeds, but they're all equipped with a gadget called "Situation N" which can instantly teleport them away from trouble. Only thing is, it can only ever be used once per city. Why? Because if they used it more than once it would be too convenient for the author, I guess.
** This is really a ''FridgeLogic'' issue. A city's "City Fathers" AI has this "Standard Situation N" last resort action that turns loose their accumulated information store to produce some unpredictable solution, which is then wiped from memory to prevent lazy city managers or mayors from using it frivolously. (Why would it be frivolous to use it all the time? Because it's automatically wiped from memory, so that would waste their one last-resort option . . . er . . . wait a minute . . .) In this particular case (near the end of ''Earthman's Burden'') it teleported the cities involved away from an untenable situation; but the leaders didn't know in advance exactly what would happen. It's hard to think of a clearer case of ''deus ex machina''; yet Blish presents the gimmick so convincingly that it took this troper, at least, many a reading before the circularity of the reasoning dawned on him.

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* In James Blish's ''Literature/CitiesInFlight'' novels, the cities of the title can fly at faster-than-light speeds, but they're all equipped with a gadget called "Situation N" which can instantly teleport them away from trouble. Only thing is, it can only ever be used once per city. Why? Because if they used it more than once it would be too convenient for the author, I guess.\n** This is really a ''FridgeLogic'' issue. A city's "City Fathers" AI has this "Standard Situation N" last resort action that turns loose their accumulated information store to produce some unpredictable solution, which is then wiped from memory to prevent lazy city managers or mayors from using it frivolously. (Why would it be frivolous to use it all the time? Because it's automatically wiped from memory, so that would waste their one last-resort option . . . er . . . wait a minute . . .) In this particular case (near the end of ''Earthman's Burden'') it teleported the cities involved away from an untenable situation; but the leaders didn't know in advance exactly what would happen. It's hard to think of a clearer case of ''deus ex machina''; yet Blish presents the gimmick so convincingly that it took this troper, at least, many a reading before the circularity of the reasoning dawned on him.


* During the FinalBattle of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaStikers'', Fate T. Harlaown, whose fighting style is already based around her SuperSpeed, reveals the ultimate mode of her Barrier Jacket (essentially, MagicalGirl-themed PoweredArmor), the True Sonic Form, which allows her to move faster than even top-of-the-line combat cyborgs can track her. Its activation phrase even starts with an "Overdrive" command. The reason why she doesn't use it all the time, however, becomes apparent soon thereafter: with all of the Jacket's energy pumped into speed, it offers all the physical protection of a wet tissue.

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* During the FinalBattle of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaStikers'', ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaStrikers'', Fate T. Harlaown, whose fighting style is already based around her SuperSpeed, reveals the ultimate mode of her Barrier Jacket (essentially, MagicalGirl-themed PoweredArmor), the True Sonic Form, which allows her to move faster than even top-of-the-line combat cyborgs can track her. Its activation phrase even starts with an "Overdrive" command. The reason why she doesn't use it all the time, however, becomes apparent soon thereafter: with all of the Jacket's energy pumped into speed, it offers all the physical protection of a wet tissue.


** Notably the series points out some of the real life the limitations of this trope. [=AE86=] ''doesen't go faster when it's over-reving'', rather Takumi uses this to gain more flexibility when he's changing between gears.

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** Notably the series points out some of the real life the limitations of this trope. [=AE86=] ''doesen't ''doesn't go faster when it's over-reving'', rather Takumi uses this to gain more flexibility when he's changing between gears.gears.
* During the FinalBattle of ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaStikers'', Fate T. Harlaown, whose fighting style is already based around her SuperSpeed, reveals the ultimate mode of her Barrier Jacket (essentially, MagicalGirl-themed PoweredArmor), the True Sonic Form, which allows her to move faster than even top-of-the-line combat cyborgs can track her. Its activation phrase even starts with an "Overdrive" command. The reason why she doesn't use it all the time, however, becomes apparent soon thereafter: with all of the Jacket's energy pumped into speed, it offers all the physical protection of a wet tissue.


* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'', where in one of his attempts to steal a Krabby Patty, Plankton shouts "You'll never catch me Krabs! Not after I shift into MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE!". [[Main/RealityEnsues Since his machine is about a foot tall]], [[Main/FunnyMoments this doesn't even take him out of Krabs' arm range]].

to:

* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'', where in one of his attempts to steal a Krabby Patty, Plankton shouts "You'll never catch me Krabs! Not after I shift into MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE!". [[Main/RealityEnsues Since his machine is about a foot tall]], [[Main/FunnyMoments [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments this doesn't even take him out of Krabs' arm range]].


Odd as it may seem, this unexplained increase in speed can have some basis in reality. It can be simplified as a cost vs. benefit decision. If somebody has 'nothing to lose' and ''must'' be somewhere at a certain time then they have to speed up - BUT - if they push their machine too hard it will fail before they get there. If they had backed off slightly, then it could have broken down ''after'' they had arrived. In a race a driver will hold back simply because there's a notable difference between "the fastest they can drive" and "the fastest they can continuously drive without wear and tear [[PhlebotinumBreakdown completely destroying the engine halfway through the race]]". Smart drivers limit themselves to the latter, and use the engine-wrecking speeds in short bursts--or for those desperate final laps.

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Odd as it may seem, this unexplained increase in speed can have some basis in reality. It can be simplified as a cost vs. benefit decision. If somebody has 'nothing to lose' and ''must'' be somewhere at a certain time then they have to speed up - BUT - if they push their machine too hard it will fail before they get there. If they had backed off slightly, then it could have broken down ''after'' they had arrived. In a race a driver will hold back simply because there's a notable difference between "the fastest they can drive" and "the fastest they can continuously drive without wear and tear [[PhlebotinumBreakdown completely destroying the engine halfway through the race]]". Smart drivers limit themselves to the latter, former, and use the engine-wrecking speeds in short bursts--or for those desperate final laps.

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* PlayedForLaughs in ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'', where in one of his attempts to steal a Krabby Patty, Plankton shouts "You'll never catch me Krabs! Not after I shift into MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE!". [[Main/RealityEnsues Since his machine is about a foot tall]], [[Main/FunnyMoments this doesn't even take him out of Krabs' arm range]].


* The podrace from ''Film/StarWars: Episode I - Film/ThePhantomMenace'' is all over this trope. Sometimes Anakin passes other racers with ease, and other times he keeps pace with Sebulba over long straightaways. It also genuinely makes zero sense that he wasn't going as fast as he could to begin with, considering how he started the race in last place due to engine failure and his freedom was on the line.

to:

* The podrace from ''Film/StarWars: Episode I - Film/ThePhantomMenace'' is all over this trope. Sometimes Anakin passes other racers with ease, and other times he keeps pace with Sebulba over long straightaways. It also genuinely makes zero sense that he wasn't going as fast as he could to begin with, considering how he started the race in last place due to engine failure and his freedom was on the line. Explained in the spin-off videogame: The engines can't run at full power for very long before they begin to overheat, and once their temperature passes the redline they will ''very'' quickly seize up, catch fire or otherwise fail catastrophically.



* ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'' has "Lubricous Speed", an even-faster-than-regular-Faster-Than-Light speed mode for Spaceball One that is used to try to catch up with the heroes. The problem is that it's so fast that it ''overshoots'' the heroes and anything not tied or nailed down inside of the ship is violently thrown around with the immense G-forces of the acceleration and instant stop.

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* ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'' has "Lubricous "Ludicrous Speed", an even-faster-than-regular-Faster-Than-Light speed mode for Spaceball One that is used to try to catch up with the heroes. The problem is that it's so fast that it ''overshoots'' the heroes and anything not tied or nailed down inside of the ship is violently thrown around with the immense G-forces of the acceleration and instant stop.


* The ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' mini-game "Slot Car Derby" punishes players who maintain the maximum speed for too long on tight turns by making the car spin around for a second and have to accelerate from zero again. A common strategy is to ease off on the analog stick just before this happens, watching for the puffs of smoke that serve as a warning, then pump it back to maximum the very next second.

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* The ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' mini-game "Slot Car Derby" punishes players who maintain the maximum speed for too long on tight turns by making the car spin around for a second and have to accelerate from zero again. A common strategy is to ease off on the analog stick just before this happens, watching for the puffs of smoke that serve as a warning, then pump it back to maximum the very next second. "Slot Car Derby" returns in the second game, which also has "Filet Relay", where players dressed as penguins can mash the A button to move faster, but will wobble and fall over if they go too fast.


* Humans (and many other animals) can do something like this. Between adrenalin increasing blood pressure to move more oxygen and fuel to muscle cells, and muscle cells over-performing at the potential cost of both tearing themselves apart ''and'' overheating to death, normal humans can manage to lift cars and outrun sprinters under duress. The reason your average person doesn't perform like an Olympian all the time? They would die very quickly if they kept that over-performance up for longer than a few hours, at best.

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* Humans (and many other animals) can do something like this. Between adrenalin adrenaline increasing blood pressure to move more oxygen and fuel to muscle cells, and muscle cells over-performing at the potential cost of both tearing themselves apart ''and'' overheating to death, normal humans can manage to [[https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/extreme-fear-superhuman/ lift cars cars]] and outrun sprinters under duress. The reason your average person doesn't perform like an Olympian all the time? They would die very quickly if they kept that over-performance up for longer than a few hours, at best.

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