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** Buck Owens' 1969 No. 1 country hit "Tall, Dark Stranger." Video stills from the song, plus at least three others, were included in the liner notes to Owens' three-CD box set, issued by Rhino Records in 1991. Both "Tall Dark Stranger" and "Big In Vegas," which topped out at No. 5 in early January 1970, have been uploaded to various video sharing sites and also have aired on ''Series/HeeHaw'' and the [=GAC=] family of networks.

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** Buck Owens' 1969 No. 1 country hit "Tall, Dark Stranger." Video stills from the song, plus at least three others, were included in the liner notes to Owens' three-CD box set, issued by Rhino Records Creator/RhinoRecords in 1991. Both "Tall Dark Stranger" and "Big In Vegas," which topped out at No. 5 in early January 1970, have been uploaded to various video sharing sites and also have aired on ''Series/HeeHaw'' and the [=GAC=] family of networks.

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* Music/{{Chieftain}}


* Music/ConfessionExecutiveCommitteeLoveSeries

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* Music/ConfessionExecutiveCommitteeLoveSeriesMusic/ConfessionExecutiveCommittee series


* Music videos are generally OlderThanTheyThink: it wasn't unusual for popular jazz singers and crooners in TheThirties to film "soundies" - usually extracts from films in which the song was performed - as a means of promoting their new songs. Famous ones include a video of Ella Fitzgerald performing "A-Tisket A-Tasket" on a bus in 1938 (an extract from the film ''Ride 'Em Cowboy'').
** There was even a video jukebox developed in the early 1940s for such short films. Scopitone was another video jukebox from the mid-1960s, playing videos from popular artists of the time. Rowe has brought out several video jukeboxes, including one showcased in a 1985 episode of the game show ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' (costing $12,900). Now, of course, video jukeboxes are rather common and -- depending on how good the [=WiFi=] is in a given location -- can download videos from a central server relatively quickly.
** V-discs are one example of filmed musical performances made for viewing by WWII soldiers. Footage exists of the AndrewsSisters performing "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" in such a format.
* Many musical films and comedies from the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s have musical segments that showcased popular tunes of the day.
* The film ''Film/BlackboardJungle'' (1955) became a huge success when Bill Haley and his Comets' hit "Rock Around The Clock" was used as the opening theme. Teenagers just went to the film theaters to listen to this hit blasting out of the speakers at top volume.

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* Music videos are generally OlderThanTheyThink: it wasn't unusual for popular Lee de Forest's experimental Phonofilms produced starting in 1923 featured vaudeville performers, many of which had a musical element to their act, such as Eddie Cantor and jazz band Ben Bernie and All the Lads.
* With the arrival of talkies in the late 1920s, a lot of musical shorts featuring bands,
singers and crooners in TheThirties to film "soundies" - usually extracts from films in dancers were produced, notably Creator/WarnerBros' "Vitaphone" shorts, named after their sound-on-disc process which was a rival to the song was performed - as a means of promoting their new songs. Famous ones include a video of Ella Fitzgerald performing "A-Tisket A-Tasket" on a bus in 1938 (an extract from the film ''Ride 'Em Cowboy'').
** There was even a video jukebox developed in the early 1940s for such short films. Scopitone was another video jukebox from the mid-1960s, playing videos from popular artists of the time. Rowe has brought out several video jukeboxes, including one showcased in a 1985 episode of the game show ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'' (costing $12,900). Now, of course, video jukeboxes are rather common and -- depending on how good the [=WiFi=] is in a given location -- can download videos from a central server relatively quickly.
** V-discs are one example of filmed
now-standard sound-on-film process. As well, musical performances made for viewing by WWII soldiers. Footage exists of the AndrewsSisters performing "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" in such a format.
* Many musical films
film and comedies from the 1930s, 1940s and 1930s to the 1950s have would often feature musical segments that showcased showcasing popular tunes of the day.
day with little to no relevance to the plot (if any).
* Soundies were produced from 1940 to 1947 for use in a video jukebox called the Panoram. The list of artists who recorded them reads like a who's who of 1940s music: Music/EllaFitzgerald, Music/DukeEllington, Music/LouisArmstrong, Music/NatKingCole, Music/SpikeJones, Stan Kenton, Jimmy Dorsey, Music/LawrenceWelk are but a few of the many who made Soundies. As the Panoram became obsolete with the arrival of commercial TV, Soundies were repackaged as home movies, then syndicated to television, then reissued on VHS and DVD.
* Telescriptions, produced by Snader Entreprises from 1950-52 and by Studio Films from 1952-54, were like Soundies but made expressly for television, featuring much of the same artists. Telescriptions and Soundies were often used to plug holes in programming (such as the last few minutes in the time slot of a movie) or shown as part of a "video DJ" program (such as KTLA's ''The Gene Norman Show'' or WFIL's ''Bandstand'', which later mutated into ''Series/AmericanBandstand''), predating Creator/{{MTV}} by three decades. Music/{{Liberace}} got his big break with the help of Telescriptions. Like Soundies, Telescriptions were also repackaged as home movies then reissued on VHS and DVD.
* The video jukebox idea was revived in 1958 with the French-made Scopitone, which repackaged the Panoram in a more modern cabinet and now used color film. (Similar machines such as the Italian Cinebox and the American Color-Sonic were also made.) First becoming popular in Europe (particularly France, West Germany and England), it later spread to the United States where they were installed in cocktail lounges and other more adult establishments to deliberately avoid competition with jukeboxes for the teen audience, which is reflected by the U.S.-produced Scopitone films being relatively lacking in "rock" acts, especially [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion British Invasion]] acts. Scopitone films, especially the U.S. ones, are notorious for their disjointed editing style and the [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment random addition]] of scantily-clad female dancers for gratuitous FanService. The Scopitone's popularity faded by the end of the 1960s, but video jukeboxes are still made by companies such as Rowe (one of their models was featured in a 1985 episode of ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'', costing $12,900) and are rather common, now using [=Wi-Fi=] to download music videos into the machine.
* The film ''Film/BlackboardJungle'' (1955) became a huge success when Bill Haley and his Comets' hit "Rock Around The Clock" was used as the opening theme. Teenagers just went to the film theaters to listen to this hit blasting out of the speakers at top volume. Conversely, the film helped the song, initially just the B-side of the now-obscure "Thirteen Women (and Only One Man in Town)", become a smash hit.


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* Tony Bennett created a clip in 1956 for his recording of "Stranger in Paradise" by filming himself walking along the Serpentine in Hyde Park, London. The result was sent to U.K. and U.S. television stations for broadcast on music shows such as ''Series/AmericanBandstand''. Bennett claims in his autobiography that this was the first music video; in any case, this may well be the first case of an artist sending out a videoclip to TV shows in lieu of performing in person, much like Music/TheBeatles would do years later.


** The Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon gives us ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'', essentially a feature-length compilation of classical music videos. The "package features" ''Disney/MakeMineMusic'' and ''Disney/MelodyTime'' follow a similar format, but with popular music (although some segments were originally conceived for ''Fantasia'' or its planned continuations). Individual segments were later released as stand alone shorts.

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** The Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon gives us ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Fantasia}}'', essentially a feature-length compilation of classical music videos. The "package features" ''Disney/MakeMineMusic'' ''WesternAnimation/MakeMineMusic'' and ''Disney/MelodyTime'' ''WesternAnimation/MelodyTime'' follow a similar format, but with popular music (although some segments were originally conceived for ''Fantasia'' or its planned continuations). Individual segments were later released as stand alone shorts.


* Music/DuranDuran's "Girls on Film", "Hungry Like The Wolf" and "Rio" -- early "cinematic" music videos that used both the letterbox format and [[SceneryPorm exotic locations]]. [[MissFanservice And very exotic ladies doing very exotic things]].

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* Music/DuranDuran's "Girls on Film", "Hungry Like The Wolf" and "Rio" -- early "cinematic" music videos that used both the letterbox format and [[SceneryPorm [[SceneryPorn exotic locations]]. [[MissFanservice And very exotic ladies doing very exotic things]].

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* Music/BestFriend

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* Music/DontPlayTheFoolAmerica

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* Music/SheWillBeLoved


* Music/{{BU}} [[note]]Music/{{BTS}}'s music video universe.[[/note]]

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* Music/{{BU}} [[note]]Music/{{BTS}}'s music video universe.[[/note]]The Music/BTSUniverse


* Squarepusher had a very notable music video for [[https://youtu.be/4UAicXgT6AU "Come On My Selector"]], which talks about the escape of a young girl from a mental hospital. The video's actions are synchronized with the music, and it's also a SugarWiki/{{Funny Moment|s}}.

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* Squarepusher had a very notable music video for [[https://youtu.be/4UAicXgT6AU "Come On My Selector"]], which talks about the escape of a young girl from a mental hospital. The video's actions are synchronized with the music, and it's also a SugarWiki/{{Funny Moment|s}}.music.



* "Sing" by Music/{{Travis}}. What starts out as a fancy lunch at a country house quickly evolves into a [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments hilariously]] [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome awesome food fight]]. Notable for being re-enacted on ''Series/TopOfThePops''.

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* "Sing" by Music/{{Travis}}. What starts out as a fancy lunch at a country house quickly evolves into a [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments hilariously]] [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome awesome food fight]].FoodFight. Notable for being re-enacted on ''Series/TopOfThePops''.

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* Music/CatHairballs


* Music/TalkingHeads' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IsSpAOD6K8 music video]] for [[Music/RemainInLight "Once in a Lifetime"]] became one of the first music videos to receive heavy rotation on the then-fledgling MTV. Its surreal imagery of Music/DavidByrne performing erratic rituals in a WhiteVoidRoom became a striking image to viewers in 1981, and can be credited with popularizing "Once in a Lifetime" to the point of it becoming Talking Heads' SignatureSong.

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* Music/TalkingHeads' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IsSpAOD6K8 music video]] for [[Music/RemainInLight "Once in a Lifetime"]] became one of the first music videos to receive heavy rotation on the then-fledgling MTV. Its surreal imagery of Music/DavidByrne performing erratic rituals rituals[[note]]Choreographed by the above metioned Toni Basil, no less![[/note]] in a WhiteVoidRoom became a striking image to viewers in 1981, and can be credited with popularizing "Once in a Lifetime" to the point of it becoming Talking Heads' SignatureSong.


* In the mid 1960s Music/TheBeatles started making films to promote their albums, much the way Music/{{Elvis}} did. But they soon evolved from there...

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* In the mid 1960s Music/TheBeatles started making films to promote their albums, much the way Music/{{Elvis}} Elvis did. But they soon evolved from there...

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