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* ''VideoGame/PathOfExile'' has Tormented Spirit enemies which can appear in any area. Spirits are guaranteed to drop at least one rare item, but they will only flee from players and will vanish after a set time. They also act as a RandomDropBooster, conferring a buff on any normal and magic monsters they pass that makes them deadlier but increases drop quantity and quality. They can also possess a rare or unique monster for an even greater effect.

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* ''VideoGame/PathOfExile'' has Tormented Spirit enemies which can appear in any area. Spirits are guaranteed to drop at least one rare item, but they will only flee from players and will vanish after a set time. They also act as a RandomDropBooster, conferring a buff on any normal and magic monsters they pass that makes them deadlier but increases drop quantity and quality. They can also possess a rare or unique monster for an even greater effect. Unlike the typical examples, ''not'' killing them before they possess an enemy is harder than killing them.


** In ''[[VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki Trails from Zero]]'', while they give a fair amount of EXP on defeat, the amount of sepith given will be enough to unlock slots to improve your [[{{Mana}} EP]].

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** In ''[[VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesZeroNoKiseki Trails from Zero]]'', while they give a fair amount of EXP on defeat, the amount of sepith given will be enough to unlock slots to improve your [[{{Mana}} EP]].

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* ''Mad Shark'' (the UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame by Creator/{{Allumer}}) has a green car that sometimes appears midway through Round 1, at a point where lots of other enemies are onscreen. Destroying it nets you 50000 points, but you can't even hit it until it starts speeding away.

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* ''VideoGame/YakuzaLikeADragon'' has the Invested Vagabonds. They appear in a few scripted places in dungeons, tend to run from battle quickly and also take 1 damage from most attacks that don't crit. However, the XP that they drop when defeated will often be enough for everyone in the party to level up both their character and current job at least once.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'''s randomized treasure dungeons (The Aquapolis, Canals of Uznair and Dungeons of Lyhe Ghiah) all have an uncommon chance of spawning additional creatures mid-fight. Sometimes these simply take the form of a giant cyclops or yeti to keep you on your toes, but other times the creatures are cute and harmless things like goblins or walking vegetables, that must be killed before they can flee - or in some cases, killed in a specific order. Managing to do so before they can get away will reward the party with bonus gil, elemental crystals, or furniture items.


** They show up again in ''VideoGame/Persona4'', where they're usually immune to physical damage. There is a trick to them this time around, however -- they're always weak to the element used by the person who owns the dungeon, and the ones in the last three levels are vulnerable to dark and light. The sole exception is the one in the Heaven dungeon, who is immune to ''everything''. How do you beat it? Use any Almighty-type attack (including an All-Out Attack), or break its resistance-- both options are easier said than done.
** Whether they're better or worse in ''VideoGame/Persona4'' is up to personal choice. Save the Happiness Hand (resists everything), all of them are completely immune to everything except three things: Almighty, physical, and one key element that they resist, but still take damage from, which will be difficult to spot and there are no hints to. They have a tendency to run away outright, or if they don't, cast status effects that will drop your hit rate and damage, enabling them to survive long enough to run, and which have an alarmingly high hit rate. It gets even worse--if they're in the ring for even a remote amount of time, they ''will'' cast Masukukaja, making hitting them impossible unless you waste time reducing their insane agility first. However, they're fairly susceptible to All-Out Attacks, lower-leveled ones can be easily killed with the Smart Bomb (which does Almighty damage), and if Chie gets a follow-up attack, she can instantly kill one.

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** They show up again return in ''VideoGame/Persona4'', where the rules have changed a bit. Now they're usually immune to physical damage. There is a trick to them this time around, however -- they're always weak to the element used by the person who owns the dungeon, and the ones in the last three levels are only vulnerable to dark physical attacks (but they have ludicrously high Endurance and light. The sole exception is the one in the Heaven dungeon, who is immune to ''everything''. How do you beat it? Use any Almighty-type attack (including an All-Out Attack), or break its resistance-- both options are easier said than done.
** Whether they're better or worse in ''VideoGame/Persona4'' is up to personal choice. Save the Happiness Hand (resists everything), all of them are completely immune to everything except three things: Almighty, physical,
Agility), Almighty attacks, and one key element that per dungeon (which they resist, but still take damage from, which will be difficult to spot and there are no hints to. They have a tendency to run away outright, or if they don't, cast not block). They're also fond of causing status effects that effects, casting Sukukaja on themselves to make them even harder to hit, and landing critical hits followed by running away. All-Out Attacks will drop your hit rate and damage, enabling still steamroll them if you can get them to survive long enough to run, launch, and which have an alarmingly high hit rate. It gets even worse--if they're in the ring for even a remote amount of time, they ''will'' cast Masukukaja, making hitting them impossible unless you waste time reducing their insane agility first. However, they're fairly susceptible to All-Out Attacks, lower-leveled ones can be easily killed with the on lower-level dungeons, Smart Bomb (which does Bombs (items that deal Almighty damage), damage) will annihilate them. Unlike in ''3'', they drop no items, but always cough up ridiculous amounts of experience and money. Also unlike ''3'', if Chie gets you chase one, there's a follow-up attack, she can instantly kill one.good chance it will ''trip'', allowing you to immediately catch it.

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** Another Corpus annoyance is the Crown Bearer, a tough and annoying mook that spawns once per mission. While he can't attack you, he takes considerable firepower to put down, runs away at surprising speed, turns invisible, and throws tether grenades to stick you to the floor. He also escapes via teleportation if you don't kill him within 90 seconds of his appearance. The reason to bother taking him down at all is because he drops Granum Crowns, a type of access token for the special Granum Void zone which is the only place where parts for certain weapons and frames are located.

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** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' also has the Goldman/Gold Golem, a stronger version of the regular Golem which gives a lot of experience and wealth upon defeat.

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* ''VideoGame/TheGreatGaias'': Hedron type enemies are rare encounters that tend to flee, but will drop a lot of EXP if slain. They also take only one damage per hit, making it hard to kill them without multihit attacks. However, the Celestium Sword can kill even the strongest Hedron in one blow.


** Whether they're better or worse in ''VideoGame/Persona4Golden'' is up to personal choice. Save the Happiness Hand (resists everything), all of them are completely immune to everything except three things: Almighty, physical, and one key element that they resist, but still take damage from, which will be difficult to spot and there are no hints to. They have a tendency to run away outright, or if they don't, cast status effects that will drop your hit rate and damage, enabling them to survive long enough to run, and which have an alarmingly high hit rate. It gets even worse--if they're in the ring for even a remote amount of time, they ''will'' cast Masukukaja, making hitting them impossible unless you waste time reducing their insane agility first. However, they're fairly susceptible to All-Out Attacks, lower-leveled ones can be easily killed with the Smart Bomb (which does Almighty damage), and if Chie gets a follow-up attack, she can instantly kill one.

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** Whether they're better or worse in ''VideoGame/Persona4Golden'' ''VideoGame/Persona4'' is up to personal choice. Save the Happiness Hand (resists everything), all of them are completely immune to everything except three things: Almighty, physical, and one key element that they resist, but still take damage from, which will be difficult to spot and there are no hints to. They have a tendency to run away outright, or if they don't, cast status effects that will drop your hit rate and damage, enabling them to survive long enough to run, and which have an alarmingly high hit rate. It gets even worse--if they're in the ring for even a remote amount of time, they ''will'' cast Masukukaja, making hitting them impossible unless you waste time reducing their insane agility first. However, they're fairly susceptible to All-Out Attacks, lower-leveled ones can be easily killed with the Smart Bomb (which does Almighty damage), and if Chie gets a follow-up attack, she can instantly kill one.


** Possibly due going back to using demons as enemies like the older games, ''VideoGame/Persona5'' instead has the rare Treasure Demons, which like the Golden Hands from previous games drop tons of experience and money, but are extremely resistant to damage in all except one element, and flee from battle if the player takes too long to beat them (generally on their third turn). Their weaknesses are a bit difficult to exploit, often relying on the player's own spread of skills, and later on they lack weaknesses entirely, forcing the player to use a CriticalHit to knock them down for negotiation (or using rare Almighty spells to bypass their defenses). If you do successfully down them, you can recruit Treasure Demons with no hassle, and they're added to your compendium. Although they can't be used in battle, they have a plethora of useful skills making them great fusion fodder (on top of causing rank-up/rank-down fusions), and also give a great experience bonus if used in a sacrifice fusion. You'll also only find a handful in any dungeon, as they're randomly hidden in various receptacles throughout a given dungeon, though a creatable tool, Treasure Trap, can increase their spawn chances.

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** Possibly due going back to using demons as enemies like the older games, ''VideoGame/Persona5'' instead has the rare Treasure Demons, which like the Golden Hands from previous games drop tons of experience and money, but are extremely resistant to damage in all except one element, and flee from battle if the player takes too long to beat them (generally on their third turn). Their weaknesses are a bit difficult to exploit, often relying on the player's own spread of skills, and later on they lack weaknesses entirely, forcing the player to use a CriticalHit to knock them down for negotiation (or using rare Almighty spells to bypass their defenses). If you do successfully down them, you can recruit Treasure Demons with no hassle, and they're added to your compendium. Although they can't be used in battle, they have a plethora of useful skills making them great fusion fodder (on top of causing rank-up/rank-down fusions), and also give a great experience bonus if used in a sacrifice fusion. You'll also only find a handful in any dungeon, as they're randomly hidden in various receptacles throughout a given dungeon, though a creatable tool, Treasure Trap, can increase their spawn chances. In addition, they can be turned into surprisingly good accessories.
** 5's UpdatedRerelease, Royal, changed the Treasure Demons up. While they are resistant to Physical and Gun skills (minus one which is weak to Gun), they have lost their other resistances and now each have a single weakness to exploit. Said weaknesses have also changed from how vanilla Persona 5 had them.


** The appropriately named Metal enemies. They are only encountered in the [[PeninsulaOfPowerLevelling Metal Zones]], which are inaccessible other than certain times of the day. They give a lot of EXP, but tend to run away as soon as they get their turn. The normal types are easy enough to kill, but there are also "Runner" types, which are capable of moving ''during your turn'' to avoid being pincered. Fortunately they are susceptible to status effects and getting afflicted will make them stop running. Later zones include Metal Mirrors, which dodges most physical attacks, absorbs physical attacks, and counters with extremely hard-hitting attacks, but like the Runners certain ailments will disable them.

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** The appropriately named Metal enemies. They are only encountered in the [[PeninsulaOfPowerLevelling [[PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling Metal Zones]], which are inaccessible other than certain times of the day. They give a lot of EXP, but tend to run away as soon as they get their turn. The normal types are easy enough to kill, but there are also "Runner" types, which are capable of moving ''during your turn'' to avoid being pincered. Fortunately they are susceptible to status effects and getting afflicted will make them stop running. Later zones include Metal Mirrors, which dodges most physical attacks, absorbs physical attacks, and counters with extremely hard-hitting attacks, but like the Runners certain ailments will disable them.



* ''Franchise/SaintsRow:''

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* ''Franchise/SaintsRow:''''VideoGame/SaintsRow:''

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* ''VideoGame/BugFables'' has Golden Seedlings, who are extremely rare, receive only one damage from attacks (and if you use multi-hit attacks, only the first hit will register), deal a lot of damage, have a tendency to flee the fight, but they give a lot of experience and drop the rare Tangy Berry, which can be cooked to create powerful health-restoring items.


** The Cactrot/Cactuar from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' onward. They're generally rare, prone to running away, extremely difficult to hit through conventional means, and will reward tons of EXP, AP, gil, and/or valuable items if defeated.

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'': Iron Giant. Only appears on the upper floors of [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon Pandaemonium]] and can run away if you take too long to finish it off. They can drop: Aegis Shield (Blocks Ailments), Genji gear, and Excalibur. The remakes add the Steel Giant for Soul of Rebirth which is a souped up version of Iron Giant.
** The Cactrot/Cactuar from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' onward. They're generally rare, prone to running away, extremely difficult to hit through conventional means, and will reward tons of EXP, AP, gil, and/or valuable items if defeated. There's also Intangir, they spawn invisible, absorb every single element, and are immune to every status effect in the game save for Stop. If you manage to hit them, they become visible, and hit your entire party with a Meteor spell, doing about 1200 HP worth of damage to the entire party, and then become invisible again. At the time you can first encounter them, this spell will one-shot your entire party unless you have done level grinding. They have 32,000 HP, more than many enemies and even ''bosses'' in the World of Ruin. If their HP drops too low, they flee. They also cast Meteor when they die. Your reward for killing this monstrosity is 10 AP, the most AP you can get from any encounter in the game. Thanks to the [[GoodBadBug Vanish-Doom Bug]] in the original version, these enemies could be farmed all day and night with Gau's Mu [[DiscOneNuke Rage]] without fear of them killing your party since it kills targets and denies them a [[TakingYouWithMe dying action]]. However, with the Game Boy Advance port, this bug has been fixed.



* In the first ''VideoGame/{{Persona 1}}'', there's an incredibly small chance you'll run into series staple Alice in dungeons. She lacks real offensive capabilities, but has the best stats this side of the final bosses... and she'll usually run away instead of using any magic. If you manage to defeat her, she'll drop a Pagan Idol, which is used to fuse Beelzebub.
* Gold-plated enemies such as the "Wealth Hand" and "Treasure Hand" pop up at certain intervals in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}''. They always get first strike, run away at the drop of a hat, are immune to all magic and have impossibly high dodge abilities and defense. The only way to kill them is to use a physical attack they're weak against -- they switch weaknesses every round and analyze never works on them.
** And you'll need to hunt and kill these little cretins, for completing Elizabeth's requests. In the UpdatedRerelease ''Persona 3: FES'', the Hands now occasionally drop "empty" weapons, which are used in the new item forging system.
** By far the worst part is that, when you find them before entering the battle, you have to sneak up on them. Failure to do so (and sneaking is ''extremely'' picky) will result in the creature running away from you just as fast as you run after it. And if you manage to corner it? It ''disappears''.
** In ''FES'', they also did away with their immunities, which makes hunting them ''marginally'' less irritating. They're horribly annoying to hunt, though, because of their tendency to run away at the slightest provocation.
** [[SarcasmMode It gets better]] when after failing to track down and murder these critters, the one you finally manage to kill drops [[VendorTrash a Treasure Coin.]]
** It somehow gets even worse: if you happen to see a gold shadow upon entering a dungeon floor, assume that the Reaper is near. If you see two of them, Death is standing right behind you. Congratulations: you've beaten a Hand and obtained a rare reward. You have five seconds to reach an access point or the stairs if you want to keep that reward. (This becomes less of an issue midway through the game when you have access to Escape Route, which transports you to safety, but even then.)
* They show up again in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', where they're usually immune to physical damage. There is a trick to them this time around, however -- they're always weak to the element used by the person who owns the dungeon, and the ones in the last three levels are vulnerable to dark and light. The sole exception is the one in the Heaven dungeon, who is immune to ''everything''. How do you beat it? Use any Almighty-type attack (including an All-Out Attack), or break its resistance-- both options are easier said than done.
** Whether they're better or worse in ''Golden'' is up to personal choice. Save the Happiness Hand (resists everything), all of them are completely immune to everything except three things: Almighty, physical, and one key element that they resist, but still take damage from, which will be difficult to spot and there are no hints to. They have a tendency to run away outright, or if they don't, cast status effects that will drop your hit rate and damage, enabling them to survive long enough to run, and which have an alarmingly high hit rate. It gets even worse--if they're in the ring for even a remote amount of time, they ''will'' cast Masukukaja, making hitting them impossible unless you waste time reducing their insane agility first. However, they're fairly susceptible to All-Out Attacks, lower-leveled ones can be easily killed with the Smart Bomb (which does Almighty damage), and if Chie gets a follow-up attack, she can instantly kill one.

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* ''Franchise/{{Persona}}'':
**
In the first ''VideoGame/{{Persona 1}}'', ''VideoGame/Persona1'', there's an incredibly small chance you'll run into series staple Alice in dungeons. She lacks real offensive capabilities, but has the best stats this side of the final most enemies and bosses... and she'll usually run away instead of using any magic. If you manage to defeat her, she'll drop a Pagan Idol, which is used to fuse Beelzebub.
* ** Gold-plated enemies such as the "Wealth Hand" and "Treasure Hand" pop up at certain intervals in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}''.''VideoGame/Persona3''. They always get first strike, run away at the drop of a hat, are immune to all magic and have impossibly high dodge abilities and defense. The only way to kill them is to use a physical attack they're weak against -- they switch weaknesses every round and analyze never works on them.
** *** And you'll need to hunt and kill these little cretins, for completing Elizabeth's requests. In the UpdatedRerelease ''Persona 3: FES'', the Hands now occasionally drop "empty" weapons, which are used in the new item forging system.
** By
system. But by far the worst part is that, when you find them before entering the battle, you have to sneak up on them. Failure to do so (and sneaking is ''extremely'' picky) will result in the creature running away from you just as fast as you run after it. And if you manage to corner it? It ''disappears''.
** In ''FES'', they also did away with their immunities, which makes hunting them ''marginally'' less irritating. They're horribly annoying to hunt, though, because of their tendency to run away at the slightest provocation.
**
provocation. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]] when after failing to track down and murder these critters, the one you finally manage to kill drops [[VendorTrash a Treasure Coin.]]
** *** It somehow gets even worse: if you happen to see a gold shadow upon entering a dungeon floor, assume that the Reaper is near. If you see two of them, Death is standing right behind you. Congratulations: you've beaten a Hand and obtained a rare reward. You have five seconds to reach an access point or the stairs if you want to keep that reward. (This becomes less of an issue midway through the game when you have access to Escape Route, which transports you to safety, but even then.)
* ** They show up again in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', ''VideoGame/Persona4'', where they're usually immune to physical damage. There is a trick to them this time around, however -- they're always weak to the element used by the person who owns the dungeon, and the ones in the last three levels are vulnerable to dark and light. The sole exception is the one in the Heaven dungeon, who is immune to ''everything''. How do you beat it? Use any Almighty-type attack (including an All-Out Attack), or break its resistance-- both options are easier said than done.
** Whether they're better or worse in ''Golden'' ''VideoGame/Persona4Golden'' is up to personal choice. Save the Happiness Hand (resists everything), all of them are completely immune to everything except three things: Almighty, physical, and one key element that they resist, but still take damage from, which will be difficult to spot and there are no hints to. They have a tendency to run away outright, or if they don't, cast status effects that will drop your hit rate and damage, enabling them to survive long enough to run, and which have an alarmingly high hit rate. It gets even worse--if they're in the ring for even a remote amount of time, they ''will'' cast Masukukaja, making hitting them impossible unless you waste time reducing their insane agility first. However, they're fairly susceptible to All-Out Attacks, lower-leveled ones can be easily killed with the Smart Bomb (which does Almighty damage), and if Chie gets a follow-up attack, she can instantly kill one.



* Possibly due going back to using demons as enemies like the older games, ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' instead has the rare Treasure Demons, which like the Golden Hands from previous games drop tons of experience and money, but are extremely resistant to damage in all except one element, and flee from battle if the player takes too long to beat them (generally on their third turn). Their weaknesses are a bit difficult to exploit, often relying on the player's own spread of skills, and later on they lack weaknesses entirely, forcing the player to use a CriticalHit to knock them down for negotiation (or using rare Almighty spells to bypass their defenses). If you do successfully down them, you can recruit Treasure Demons with no hassle, and they're added to your compendium. Although they can't be used in battle, they have a plethora of useful skills making them great fusion fodder (on top of causing rank-up/rank-down fusions), and also give a great experience bonus if used in a sacrifice fusion. You'll also only find a handful in any dungeon, as they're randomly hidden in various receptacles throughout a given dungeon, though a creatable tool, Treasure Trap, can increase their spawn chances.
* ''VideoGame/PersonaQ2NewCinemaLabyrinth'' has golden enemies, which are usually weak against the opposite of the element in their name- for example, a Firebane Lexy is weak against Ice. They don't have much HP, but take one or two damage from most attacks apart from their weakness. However, if you down all the enemies, they probably won't survive the All-Out Attack. That said, they do flee if they aren't defeated after a few turns. There are also large golden enemies that resist all attacks but give money each time they're damaged, and after taking enough damage, lose the resistance shield and have their weaknesses exposed.

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* ** Possibly due going back to using demons as enemies like the older games, ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' ''VideoGame/Persona5'' instead has the rare Treasure Demons, which like the Golden Hands from previous games drop tons of experience and money, but are extremely resistant to damage in all except one element, and flee from battle if the player takes too long to beat them (generally on their third turn). Their weaknesses are a bit difficult to exploit, often relying on the player's own spread of skills, and later on they lack weaknesses entirely, forcing the player to use a CriticalHit to knock them down for negotiation (or using rare Almighty spells to bypass their defenses). If you do successfully down them, you can recruit Treasure Demons with no hassle, and they're added to your compendium. Although they can't be used in battle, they have a plethora of useful skills making them great fusion fodder (on top of causing rank-up/rank-down fusions), and also give a great experience bonus if used in a sacrifice fusion. You'll also only find a handful in any dungeon, as they're randomly hidden in various receptacles throughout a given dungeon, though a creatable tool, Treasure Trap, can increase their spawn chances.
* ** ''VideoGame/PersonaQ2NewCinemaLabyrinth'' has golden enemies, which are usually weak against the opposite of the element in their name- for example, a Firebane Lexy is weak against Ice. They don't have much HP, but take one or two damage from most attacks apart from their weakness. However, if you down all the enemies, they probably won't survive the All-Out Attack. That said, they do flee if they aren't defeated after a few turns. There are also large golden enemies that resist all attacks but give money each time they're damaged, and after taking enough damage, lose the resistance shield and have their weaknesses exposed.



* This trope is parodied in ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', the sequel to ''VideoGame/{{Earthbound}}''. At one point, you have the chance to fight the rare Mystery Metal Monkey. It's got stupid high defense in order to compensate for its low HP, but instead of giving the player a lot of experience upon its defeat, the game instead tells the player that "It was a good experience."

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* This trope is parodied in ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', ''VideoGame/Mother3'', the sequel to ''VideoGame/{{Earthbound}}''. At one point, you have the chance to fight the rare Mystery Metal Monkey. It's got stupid high defense in order to compensate for its low HP, but instead of giving the player a lot of experience upon its defeat, the game instead tells the player that "It was a good experience."



** ''VideoGame/{{Mother 1}}'' has the Red Snake, which usually runs away the first chance it gets.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Mother 1}}'' ''VideoGame/EarthboundBeginnings'' has the Red Snake, which usually runs away the first chance it gets.



* ''VideoGame/TalesSeries''

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* ''VideoGame/TalesSeries''''VideoGame/TalesOf Series''



* ''[[VideoGame/KisekiSeries Trails Series]]'':
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki'' have Shining Poms, which net enormous amounts of both EXP and sepith per kill. Due to the series' harsh AntiGrinding measures, killing most enemies near your current level will quickly reduce experience gained, making Shining Poms the only reliable way to get any LevelGrinding done. However, their agility is so enormous that only [[LimitBreak S-Crafts]] can hit them, they tend to run away whenever they get a turn, and after Chapter 1 even S-Crafts will do insufficient damage to actually ''kill'' them with their increasingly enormous HP counts. Fortunately, they're vulnerable to OneHitKill Arts like Shadow Spear and [[NonElemental Time, Space, and Mirage]] Arts in general, which quickly becomes the preferred tool for killing them.
** In ''The 3rd'', there's even a BonusBoss that consists of several Shining Poms and an even stronger Pom at their head, a Tempest Pom. Unfortunately, this requires you to trek through a long BonusDungeon in one go in order for it to spawn. Hitting them in general is a major GuideDangIt, not even S-Breaks will kill them, unless your character's STR is above 3000, a feat that'll take an InfinityPlusOneSword and some [[EliteTweak character tweaks]] to reach.
** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'', they've undergone BadassDecay, having no longer the high Agility or invulnerabilities that made them hard to kill. What's more, with ''Cold Steel'''s easing up on the Experience drops, their rewards aren't as useful, on top of only being available in a limited quantity through DLC.
* ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy II}}'': Iron Giant. Only appears on the upper floors of [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon Pandaemonium]] and can run away if you take too long to finish it off. They can drop: Aegis Shield (Blocks Ailments), Genji gear, and Excalibur. The remakes add the Steel Giant for Soul of Rebirth which is a souped up version of Iron Giant.
* ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy VI}}'': Intangir. They spawn invisible, absorb every single element, and are immune to every status effect in the game save for Stop. If you manage to hit them, they become visible, and hit your entire party with a Meteor spell, doing about 1200 HP worth of damage to the entire party, and then become invisible again. At the time you can first encounter them, this spell will one-shot your entire party unless you have done level grinding. They have 32,000 HP, more than many enemies and even ''bosses'' in the World of Ruin. If their HP drops too low, they flee. They also cast Meteor when they die. Your reward for killing this monstrosity is 10 AP, the most AP you can get from any encounter in the game. Thanks to the [[GoodBadBug Vanish-Doom Bug]] in the original version, these enemies could be farmed all day and night with Gau's Mu [[DiscOneNuke Rage]] without fear of them killing your party since it kills targets and denies them a [[TakingYouWithMe dying action]]. However, with the Game Boy Advance port, this bug has been fixed.

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* ''[[VideoGame/KisekiSeries Trails Series]]'':
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsInTheSky'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki''
''[[VideoGame/TrailsSeries The Legend of Heroes - Trails]]'' have Shining Poms, which net enormous amounts of both EXP and sepith per kill. Due to the series' harsh AntiGrinding measures, killing most enemies near your current level will quickly reduce experience gained, making Shining Poms the only reliable way to get any LevelGrinding done. However, their agility is so enormous that only [[LimitBreak S-Crafts]] can hit them, they tend to run away whenever they get a turn, and after Chapter 1 sometimes even S-Crafts will do insufficient damage to actually ''kill'' them with their increasingly enormous HP counts. Fortunately, they're vulnerable to OneHitKill Arts like Shadow Spear and [[NonElemental Time, Space, and Mirage]] Arts in general, which quickly becomes the preferred tool for killing them.
** In ''The ''VideoGame/TrailsInTheSky - The 3rd'', there's even a BonusBoss that consists of several Shining Poms and an even stronger Pom at their head, a Tempest Pom. Unfortunately, this requires you to trek through a long BonusDungeon in one go in order for it to spawn. Hitting them in general is a major GuideDangIt, not even S-Breaks will kill them, unless your character's STR is above 3000, a feat that'll take an InfinityPlusOneSword and some [[EliteTweak character tweaks]] to reach.
** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'', ''[[VideoGame/ZeroNoKiseki Trails from Zero]]'', while they give a fair amount of EXP on defeat, the amount of sepith given will be enough to unlock slots to improve your [[{{Mana}} EP]].
** In ''VideoGame/TrailsOfColdSteel'',
they've undergone BadassDecay, having no longer the high Agility or invulnerabilities that made them hard to kill. What's more, with ''Cold Steel'''s easing up on the Experience drops, their rewards aren't as useful, on top of only being available in a limited quantity through DLC.
* ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy II}}'': Iron Giant. Only appears on the upper floors of [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon Pandaemonium]] and can run away if you take too long to finish it off. They can drop: Aegis Shield (Blocks Ailments), Genji gear, and Excalibur. The remakes add the Steel Giant for Soul of Rebirth which is a souped up version of Iron Giant.
* ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy VI}}'': Intangir. They spawn invisible, absorb every single element, and are immune to every status effect in the game save for Stop. If you manage to hit them, they become visible, and hit your entire party with a Meteor spell, doing about 1200 HP worth of damage to the entire party, and then become invisible again. At the time you can first encounter them, this spell will one-shot your entire party unless you have done level grinding. They have 32,000 HP, more than many enemies and even ''bosses'' in the World of Ruin. If their HP drops too low, they flee. They also cast Meteor when they die. Your reward for killing this monstrosity is 10 AP, the most AP you can get from any encounter in the game. Thanks to the [[GoodBadBug Vanish-Doom Bug]] in the original version, these enemies could be farmed all day and night with Gau's Mu [[DiscOneNuke Rage]] without fear of them killing your party since it kills targets and denies them a [[TakingYouWithMe dying action]]. However, with the Game Boy Advance port, this bug has been fixed.
DLC.

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* Studio Nanafushi's ''Dead or School'' has the Rare Mutant, this enemy only appears in specific places and only randomly (to improve your chances of encountering one, you need an item with the Luck ability). It has no attacks, but it can run as fast as your hero Hisako and has unlimited stamina so you need to be able to chase it to a dead-end. If you defeat it, it drops a ton of money and always at least one piece of equipment.

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