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Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of producer/writer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada". It is also very apparent that simply making ''Robotech'' an anthology was, for whatever reason, not a viable option.[[/note]]

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Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of producer/writer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada". It is also very apparent evident that simply making the simple, straightforward solution of presenting ''Robotech'' an anthology was, for whatever reason, not considered a viable option.[[/note]]


Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of producer/writer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada".[[/note]]

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Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of producer/writer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada". It is also very apparent that simply making ''Robotech'' an anthology was, for whatever reason, not a viable option.[[/note]]


[[SocietyMarchesOn Over the years]], a small but growing contingent of fans began to recognize what remained of the quality of the original works in the stripped versions they were exposed to, and endeavored to reconstruct as much as possible of the original stories and characters from what they had and learn as much as possible from the scant translated information available to them. This grew to include research into the original Japanese material by those few capable of translating and understanding the language, and fanclubs were born. At the time, the term "anime" wasn't known yet and the fandom was called "Japanimation". As these fanclubs grew, they began to advocate the position that if Japanese material could be translated and presented in such a way that the bulk of the original spirit was retained, it would be of excellent storytelling quality and could find an audience. Considering that market proof for an audience for non-comedic animation that skewed older than the 8-12 demographic was, [[AnimationAgeGhetto at the time, basically nonexistent]], this was a difficult sell indeed.

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[[SocietyMarchesOn Over the years]], years, a small but growing contingent of fans began to recognize what remained of the quality of the original works in the stripped versions they were exposed to, and endeavored to reconstruct as much as possible of the original stories and characters from what they had and learn as much as possible from the scant translated information available to them. This grew to include research into the original Japanese material by those few capable of translating and understanding the language, and fanclubs were born. At the time, the term "anime" wasn't known yet and the fandom was called "Japanimation". As these fanclubs grew, they began to advocate the position that if Japanese material could be translated and presented in such a way that the bulk of the original spirit was retained, it would be of excellent storytelling quality and could find an audience. Considering that market proof for an audience for non-comedic animation that skewed older than the 8-12 demographic was, [[AnimationAgeGhetto at the time, basically nonexistent]], this was a difficult sell indeed.


Over the years, the Macekre has become a DiscreditedTrope as syndicated television has lost its luster following [[TechnologyMarchesOn the rise of cable]] and on-demand streaming. Likewise, companies that were prominent for heavy anime edits in the 1970s-2000s have either closed their doors or left the industry, while anime distributors who produce faithful dubs, even for children's television, have taken their place.[[note]]''Franchise/PowerRangers'', while [[{{Toku}} not an anime]], seems to be the sole exception today, likely because to do so would be to produce a show that was very much not ''Power Rangers'' any more.[[/note]]

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Over the years, the Macekre has become a DiscreditedTrope as syndicated television has lost its luster following [[TechnologyMarchesOn the rise of cable]] and on-demand streaming. Likewise, companies that were prominent for heavy anime edits in the 1970s-2000s have either closed their doors or left the industry, while anime distributors who produce faithful dubs, even for children's television, have taken their place.[[note]]''Franchise/PowerRangers'', while [[{{Toku}} not an anime]], seems to be the sole exception today, likely because to do so would be to produce a show that was very much not ''Power Rangers'' any more.[[/note]]
[[/note]] The rise of the internet (and to a certain extent the easy accessibility of {{Scanlation}}s and pirated fansubs) may have played a role as well; many series now have an established fanbase even before their official release, limiting how much CulturalTranslation and other drastic changes can be applied if that base is going to be appealed to.


Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of the late producer/writer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to the late Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada".[[/note]]

to:

Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of the late producer/writer [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to the late Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada".[[/note]]


Historically, ''Anime/SpeedRacer'', ''[[Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato Star Blazers]]'' (Another series where episode order is crucial to the story), and ''Voltron'' led to ''Robotech'', which in turn led to ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. Without those groundbreaking early steps, the later ones would have been impossible.

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Historically, ''Anime/SpeedRacer'', ''[[Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato Star Blazers]]'' (Another (another series where episode order is crucial to the story), and ''Voltron'' led to ''Robotech'', which in turn led to ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. Without those groundbreaking early steps, the later ones would have been impossible.


See also DifficultyByRegion and DubNameChange.

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See also DifficultyByRegion DifficultyByRegion, DubNameChange, and DubNameChange.
BadExportForYou.


Historically, ''Anime/SpeedRacer'', ''[[Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato Star Blazers]]'', and ''Voltron'' led to ''Robotech'', which in turn led to ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. Without those groundbreaking early steps, the later ones would have been impossible.

to:

Historically, ''Anime/SpeedRacer'', ''[[Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato Star Blazers]]'', Blazers]]'' (Another series where episode order is crucial to the story), and ''Voltron'' led to ''Robotech'', which in turn led to ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. Without those groundbreaking early steps, the later ones would have been impossible.


'''Bottom:''' What [[Creator/FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids]] gave us.]]

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'''Bottom:''' What The [[Creator/FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids]] gave us.4Kids dub]].]]


-->-- Creator/GregAyres recounting his first meeting with Carl Macek

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-->-- Creator/GregAyres recounting his first meeting with Carl Macek
Macek.
.


[[quoteright:350:[[Manga/OnePiece https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4kids_boot_gun1.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Left, Creator/FourKidsEntertainment version. Right, original version.]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[Manga/OnePiece [[quoteright:246:[[Manga/OnePiece https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4kids_boot_gun1.org/pmwiki/pub/images/helmeppo4kids.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Left, Creator/FourKidsEntertainment version. Right, original version.[[caption-width-right:246:'''Top:''' The original.\\
'''Bottom:''' What [[Creator/FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids]] gave us.
]]



Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of the late producer/writer [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to the late Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada".[[/note]]

to:

Pronounced similarly to "massacre", the term was coined by anime fans from the name of the late producer/writer [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Macek Carl Macek]], whose early "free adaptations" of anime frequently bore little or no resemblance to the original Japanese stories. His usual procedure was to dispose of the original script entirely, and write his own from scratch. This was no ''Anime/SamuraiPizzaCats'', however. He would often combine two or more unrelated series simply in order to have enough episodes to fulfill a syndication deal, the most famous (and successful) of these resulting in ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. He is particularly reviled for the seemingly xenophobic ruthlessness with which he purged any hint of Japanese culture -- what he euphemistically called "ethnic gestures" -- from the series which he adapted.[[note]]Macek later claimed that many of these changes, including his having to splice together three different series to create ''Robotech'', were a case of ExecutiveMeddling; he was required to force the show to fit syndication-length guidelines, without having complete scripts for any of them, while still making it compelling enough to sell the accompanying toy lines. Trying to tie the three shows together by giving them a unified script was his attempt at meeting these conditions; obviously, this didn't work as well as he hoped. As to the charges of removing "ethnic gestures" from scripts: to be fair to the late Mr. Macek, there is some evidence that his original plan was to have Hikaru Ichijyo/Rick Hunter remain ethnically Japanese, naming him "Rick Yamada".[[/note]]


-->-- Creator/GregAyres recounting his first meeting with Carl Macek.

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-->-- Creator/GregAyres recounting his first meeting with Carl Macek.
Macek


'''Carl Macek:''' Oh... So you must think I'm the Antichrist, huh? ''({{Beat}})'' Well, they always shoot the first guy past the finish line.

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'''Carl Macek:''' '''Macek:''' Oh... So you must think I'm the Antichrist, huh? ''({{Beat}})'' Well, they always shoot the first guy past the finish line.


'''Greg Ayres: I like '''''Macross'''''.\\

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'''Greg Ayres: Ayres:''' I like '''''Macross'''''.\\

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