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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' (2018, [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]]) is filled with high levels of environmental detail and interaction, alongside many other hallmarks of this genre including realistic NPC behavior and consistent rules governing the player's many ways to engage with the world (don't bathe, and the characters will comment on it for just one example). However, it loses points in term of being part of this genre due to its extremely linear strict mission design that forbids the player look for alternate routes.

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' (2018, [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]]) is filled with high levels of environmental detail and interaction, alongside many other hallmarks of this genre including realistic NPC behavior and consistent rules governing the player's many ways to engage with the world (don't bathe, and the characters will comment on it for just one example). However, it loses points in term of being part of this genre due to its extremely linear and strict mission design that forbids the player look for alternate routes.


* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' (2018, [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]]) is filled with high levels of environmental detail and interaction, alongside many other hallmarks of this genre including realistic NPC behavior and consistent rules governing the player's many ways to engage with the world. However, it loses points in term of being part of this genre due to the extremely linear strict mission design that forbids the player look for alternate routes.

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' (2018, [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]]) is filled with high levels of environmental detail and interaction, alongside many other hallmarks of this genre including realistic NPC behavior and consistent rules governing the player's many ways to engage with the world. world (don't bathe, and the characters will comment on it for just one example). However, it loses points in term of being part of this genre due to the its extremely linear strict mission design that forbids the player look for alternate routes.

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'' (2018, [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar Games]]) is filled with high levels of environmental detail and interaction, alongside many other hallmarks of this genre including realistic NPC behavior and consistent rules governing the player's many ways to engage with the world. However, it loses points in term of being part of this genre due to the extremely linear strict mission design that forbids the player look for alternate routes.

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* ''VideoGame/Cyberpunk2077'' (2020, Creator/CDProjektRed) features some elements of an ImmersiveSim, such as UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective, open-ended level design, lots of interactivity with the environment, and the ability to complete missions through non-linear means. It is however primarily an ActionRPG and restricts the player when the story calls for it, and also falls short in terms of [[ArtificialStupidity artificial intelligence.]]


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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' (1994-present, Creator/BethesdaSoftworks) have been occasionally described as an immersive sim since ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', but it was ramped up in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''. The games feature ''very'' open-ended gameplay, allowing you to explore freely, complete quests in any order, and even ignore the main storyline. ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' also introduces Radiant AI, allowing you to manipulate enemies to your whim with magic or stealth, and even make them fight each other. However, most dungeons are still fairly linear and there are few examples of SequenceBreaking, as the games are primarily WideOpenSandbox [[ActionRPG Action RPGs.]]


Because the genre had historically evolved under the expectation that {{Virtual Reality|Index}} technology was just around the corner, games in it often feature UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective and {{Diegetic Interface}}s to improve their PlayerAndProtagonistIntegration, although this is not a requirement. {{Exposition}} and WorldBuilding tend to be handled through environmental storytelling, with StoryBreadcrumbs scattered throughout the game world to encourage exploration thereof, and BackTracking is a common activity -- in this, the genre is similar to EnvironmentalNarrativeGames[[note]]which, unlike immersive sims, tend to deemphasize traditional gameplay challenges[[/note]]. Many games in it also contain nods to the number [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAtAyycx-uY 0451]][[note]]often as the first password the player uses[[/note]], in reference both to the original ''VideoGame/SystemShock''[[note]]whose first password was "451" in a nod to the keycode of the Looking Glass offices during its development[[/note]] and to ''Literature/Fahrenheit451''. Indeed, "451 game" is another common name for the genre.

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Because the genre had historically evolved under the expectation that {{Virtual Reality|Index}} technology was just around the corner, games in it often feature UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective and {{Diegetic Interface}}s to improve their PlayerAndProtagonistIntegration, although this is not a requirement. {{Exposition}} and WorldBuilding tend to be handled through environmental storytelling, with StoryBreadcrumbs scattered throughout the game world to encourage exploration thereof, and BackTracking is a common activity -- in this, the genre is similar to EnvironmentalNarrativeGames[[note]]which, unlike immersive sims, tend to deemphasize traditional gameplay challenges[[/note]]. Many games in it also contain nods to the number [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAtAyycx-uY 0451]][[note]]often as the first password the player uses[[/note]], in reference both to the original ''VideoGame/SystemShock''[[note]]whose first password was "451" in a nod to the keycode of the Looking Glass offices during its development[[/note]] and to ''Literature/Fahrenheit451''. Indeed, "451 game" is another common name for the genre.
genre and with the genre's traits now common in other game genres, some have considered a 0451 appearance being required to qualify a game as an immersive sim.


* ''VideoGame/{{Deathloop}}'' (2021, Arkane) is set on the IslandBase of 8 super-villains and their {{Mook}} armies, going through a simulated cycle of an endlessly repeating 24-hour day. You are then free to use a variety of intel gathering, sneaking, weapons and superpowers to reach and then take out the 8 rulers of the island in any order you can manage, with the various antagonists reacting to your actions and the order you take them out in variety of ways.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Deathloop}}'' (2021, Arkane) is set on the IslandBase of 8 super-villains and their {{Mook}} armies, going through a simulated cycle of an endlessly repeating 24-hour day. You are then free to use a variety of intel gathering, sneaking, weapons and superpowers to reach and then take out the 8 rulers of the island in any order you can manage, with the various antagonists reacting to your actions and the order you take them out in a variety of ways.


* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series (1998-present) is universally considered one of the genre-codifying titles[[note]]For the first three installments, at least[[/note]]. This is due to its highly systems-based stealth gameplay, its organic problem-solving elements, and its sprawling, open-ended levels]. However, all titles in the series deviate from traditional immersive sim conventions by restricting the player's ability to use violence with automatic GameOvers based on difficulty level[[note]]In the first two games, the "Hard" difficulty proscribed killing civilians while "Expert" mode forbade the player from killing any human beings at all. ''Deadly Shadows'' toned it down by forbidding killing only innocents, in "Expert" mode, during story missions -- no restrictions whatsoever applied while traversing the hub world. But the reboot brought the restrictions back, with its hardest mode permitting the killing of guards ... but forbidding the player from even ''blackjacking'' civilians, a mainstay of the prior installments.[[/note]]. In traditional immersive sim design, a game should end with the player character's death, or with a NonStandardGameOver that is very tightly woven into the narrative. While an immersive sim certainly could force nonviolent play, this would traditionally be done by just not giving the player any weapons (or by making combat prohibitively difficult), whereas Garrett always carries a sword/dagger and arrows, whose usage the rules inorganically restrict.[[note]]And while Garrett can't reliably beat even one sentry sword-to-sword on any difficulty level, he's no slouch when it comes to archery or ambushes.[[/note]]

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series (1998-present) is universally considered one of the genre-codifying titles[[note]]For the first three installments, at least[[/note]]. This is due to its highly systems-based stealth gameplay, its organic problem-solving elements, and its sprawling, open-ended levels]. However, all titles in the series deviate from traditional immersive sim conventions by restricting the player's ability to use violence with automatic GameOvers {{Game Over}}s based on difficulty level[[note]]In the first two games, the "Hard" difficulty proscribed killing civilians while "Expert" mode forbade the player from killing any human beings at all. ''Deadly Shadows'' toned it down by forbidding killing only innocents, in "Expert" mode, during story missions -- no restrictions whatsoever applied while traversing the hub world. But the reboot brought the restrictions back, with its hardest mode permitting the killing of guards ... but forbidding the player from even ''blackjacking'' civilians, a mainstay of the prior installments.[[/note]]. In traditional immersive sim design, a game should end with the player character's death, or with a NonStandardGameOver that is very tightly woven into the narrative. While an immersive sim certainly could force nonviolent play, this would traditionally be done by just not giving the player any weapons (or by making combat prohibitively difficult), whereas Garrett always carries a sword/dagger and arrows, whose usage the rules inorganically restrict.[[note]]And while Garrett can't reliably beat even one sentry sword-to-sword on any difficulty level, he's no slouch when it comes to archery or ambushes.[[/note]]


** ''System Shock'' (2021, Creator/NightdiveStudios) is a [[VideoGameRemake remake]] of the original 1994 game. Remaking the game room-by-room, making it a very faithful recreation of the original game, but at the same time with better graphics and modern videogame design principles.
** ''System Shock 3'' (TBA, [=OtherSide=]) is currently in development, with Warren Spector and Doug Church back at the helm, and promises to be true to its predecessors' principles.

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** ''System [[/index]]''System Shock'' (2021, (TBR 2021, Creator/NightdiveStudios) is a [[VideoGameRemake remake]] of the original 1994 game. Remaking the game room-by-room, making it a very faithful recreation of the original game, but at the same time with better graphics and modern videogame video game design principles.
** ''System Shock 3'' (TBA, [=OtherSide=]) is currently in development, with Warren Spector and Doug Church back at the helm, and promises to be true to its predecessors' principles.[[index]]


** ''System Shock 2 '' (1999, Irrational) is set some time after the first game on two docked spaceships, the ''Von Braun'' and the ''Rickenbacker'', after both have been overrun by a mutagenic alien hive mind known as "the Many".

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** ''System Shock 2 '' ''VideoGame/SystemShock2'' (1999, Irrational) is set some time after the first game on two docked spaceships, the ''Von Braun'' and the ''Rickenbacker'', after both have been overrun by a mutagenic alien hive mind known as "the Many".Many".
** ''System Shock'' (2021, Creator/NightdiveStudios) is a [[VideoGameRemake remake]] of the original 1994 game. Remaking the game room-by-room, making it a very faithful recreation of the original game, but at the same time with better graphics and modern videogame design principles.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Deathloop}}'' (2021, Arkane) is set on the IslandBase of 8 super-villains and their {{Mook}} armies, going through a simulated cycle of an endlessly repeating 24-hour day. You are then free to use a variety of intel gathering, sneaking, weapons and superpowers to reach and then take out the 8 rulers of the island in any order you can manage, with the various antagonists reacting to your actions and the order you take them out in variety of ways.


* '''Non-linearity'''. Both in terms of StoryBranching and level design. An immersive sim needn't be open world--most aren't--nor need it allow players to freely revisit old levels, but each level will feature many sidepaths, loads of alternate routes, secret areas (often with hidden StoryBreadcrumbs), and small touches that create the impression of a real, lived-in place that does not exist solely for the player. To this end, immersive sims very often ''break'' TheLawOfConservationOfDetail.

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* '''Non-linearity'''. Both in terms of StoryBranching and level design. An immersive sim needn't be open world--most aren't--nor world -- most aren't -- nor need it allow players to freely revisit old levels, but each level will feature many sidepaths, side paths, loads of alternate routes, secret areas (often with hidden StoryBreadcrumbs), and small touches that create the impression of a real, lived-in place that does not exist solely for the player. To this end, immersive sims very often ''break'' TheLawOfConservationOfDetail.



* ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' (2007, Creator/{{Irrational|Games}}) sees the player trapped in an UnderwaterCity of Rapture, once utopian, but now fallen to anarchy and civil war. It features the iconic splicers, Big Daddies. and Little Sisters. However, unlike earlier immersive sims, its exploreable areas are highly linear, there are less ways to interact with the world, and the game is heavily scripted, sparking some debate over whether or not it should be classified as a first-person shooter instead. Furthermore, the game's big twist can be seen as a [[DeconstructionGame deconstruction of the genre]], explicitly denying players any form of agency on what is arguably the most important decision in the game, and revealing that they only had as much as the BigBad -- and, by extension, the developers -- allowed them.

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* ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' (2007, Creator/{{Irrational|Games}}) sees the player trapped in an UnderwaterCity of Rapture, once utopian, but now fallen to anarchy and civil war. It features the iconic splicers, Big Daddies. and Little Sisters. However, unlike earlier immersive sims, its exploreable explorable areas are highly linear, there are less ways to interact with the world, and the game is heavily scripted, sparking some debate over whether or not it should be classified as a first-person shooter instead. Furthermore, the game's big twist can be seen as a [[DeconstructionGame deconstruction of the genre]], explicitly denying players any form of agency on what is arguably the most important decision in the game, and revealing that they only had as much as the BigBad -- and, by extension, the developers -- allowed them.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series (1998-present) is universally considered one of the genre-codifying titles[[note]]For the first three installments, at least[[/note]]. This is due to its highly systems-based stealth gameplay, its organic problem-solving elements, and its sprawling, open-ended levels]. However, all titles in the series deviate from traditional immersive sim conventions by restricting the player's ability to use violence with auttomatic GameOvers based on difficulty level[[note]]In the first two games, the "Hard" difficulty proscribed killing civilians while "Expert" mode forbade the player from killing any human beings at all. ''Deadly Shadows'' toned it down by forbidding killing only innocents, in "Expert" mode, during story missions--no restrictions whatsoever applied while traversing the hub world. But the reboot brought the restrictions back, with its hardest mode permitting the killing of guards ... but forbidding the player from even ''blackjacking'' civilians, a mainstay of the prior installments.[[/note]]. In traditional immersive sim design, a game should end with the player character's death, or with a NonStandardGameOver that is very tightly woven into the narrative. While an immersive sim certainly could force nonviolent play, this would traditionally be done by just not giving the player any weapons (or by making combat prohibitively difficult), whereas Garrett always carries a sword/dagger and arrows, whose usage the rules inorganically restrict.[[note]]And while Garrett can't reliably beat even one sentry sword-to-sword on any difficulty level, he's no slouch when it comes to archery or ambushes.[[/note]]

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series (1998-present) is universally considered one of the genre-codifying titles[[note]]For the first three installments, at least[[/note]]. This is due to its highly systems-based stealth gameplay, its organic problem-solving elements, and its sprawling, open-ended levels]. However, all titles in the series deviate from traditional immersive sim conventions by restricting the player's ability to use violence with auttomatic automatic GameOvers based on difficulty level[[note]]In the first two games, the "Hard" difficulty proscribed killing civilians while "Expert" mode forbade the player from killing any human beings at all. ''Deadly Shadows'' toned it down by forbidding killing only innocents, in "Expert" mode, during story missions--no missions -- no restrictions whatsoever applied while traversing the hub world. But the reboot brought the restrictions back, with its hardest mode permitting the killing of guards ... but forbidding the player from even ''blackjacking'' civilians, a mainstay of the prior installments.[[/note]]. In traditional immersive sim design, a game should end with the player character's death, or with a NonStandardGameOver that is very tightly woven into the narrative. While an immersive sim certainly could force nonviolent play, this would traditionally be done by just not giving the player any weapons (or by making combat prohibitively difficult), whereas Garrett always carries a sword/dagger and arrows, whose usage the rules inorganically restrict.[[note]]And while Garrett can't reliably beat even one sentry sword-to-sword on any difficulty level, he's no slouch when it comes to archery or ambushes.[[/note]]



* ''VisualNovel/ThePortopiaSerialMurderCase'' (1983, Chunsoft) was the first game to have most of the key immersive sim elements [[OlderThanTheyThink seven years before the founding of Looking Glass]], making it arguably an UrExample. It was a first-person adventure game with an open world, character AI, choices and consequences, non-linear game design, open-ended narrative told through notes and diaries, interactive environments, emergent gameplay, allowed multiple ways to achieve objectives, and lacked failstates.

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* ''VisualNovel/ThePortopiaSerialMurderCase'' (1983, Chunsoft) was the first game to have most of the key immersive sim elements [[OlderThanTheyThink seven years before the founding of Looking Glass]], making it arguably an UrExample. It was a first-person adventure game with an open world, character AI, choices and consequences, non-linear game design, open-ended narrative told through notes and diaries, interactive environments, emergent gameplay, allowed multiple ways to achieve objectives, and lacked failstates.fail states.



* ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' (2004, Creator/TroikaGames) is a WesternRPG that, despite its numerous explicit ludic abstractions (it was based on a TabletopRPG [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade system]], after all), manages to create a powerful sense of real space with its Gothic, vampire-run UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, with huge levels and far-reaching choices. One level in particular, the Ocean House, is often [[https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/313302/7_influential_immersive_sims_that_all_devs_should_play.php cited]] as a hallmark of immersive space design. It is not universally accepted as a true immersive sim, though, because of the player character's relatively limited ability to interact with the world's physical elements despite having the famous Source Engine at its disposal and its often-clunky handling which can make the gameplay feel like it's governed more by dicerolls than by the player's input.
* It's generally agreed that ''VideoGame/WeHappyFew'' (2018, Compulsion Games) set out to be an immersive sim in the vein of ''VideoGame/BioShock1'', albeit with a greater focus on survival and procedurally-generated elements. There's less consensus on how well it achieved those goals, but...

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* ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'' (2004, Creator/TroikaGames) is a WesternRPG that, despite its numerous explicit ludic abstractions (it was based on a TabletopRPG [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade system]], after all), manages to create a powerful sense of real space with its Gothic, vampire-run UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, with huge levels and far-reaching choices. One level in particular, the Ocean House, is often [[https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/313302/7_influential_immersive_sims_that_all_devs_should_play.php cited]] as a hallmark of immersive space design. It is not universally accepted as a true immersive sim, though, because of the player character's relatively limited ability to interact with the world's physical elements despite having the famous Source Engine at its disposal and its often-clunky handling which can make the gameplay feel like it's governed more by dicerolls dice rolls than by the player's input.
* It's generally agreed that ''VideoGame/WeHappyFew'' (2018, Compulsion Games) had set out to be an immersive sim in the vein of ''VideoGame/BioShock1'', albeit with a greater focus on survival and procedurally-generated elements. There's less consensus on how well it achieved those goals, but...procedurally generated elements.


* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series (1998-present) is universally considered one of the genre-codifying titles[[note]]For the first three installments, at least[[/note]]. This is due to its highly systems-based stealth gameplay, its organic problem-solving elements, and its sprawling, open-ended levels that can be navigated in many ways. However, all four titles in the series deviate from traditional immersive sim conventions, at least on their higher difficulty levels, by restricting the player's ability to use violence[[note]]In the first two games, the "Hard" difficulty proscribed the killing of civilians while "Expert" mode forbade the player from killing any human beings at all. ''Deadly Shadows'' toned it down by only forbidding killing innocents in "Expert" mode during story missions--no restrictions whatsoever applied while traversing the hub world--but the reboot brought the restrictions back, with its hardest mode permitting the killing of guards ... but forbidding the player from even ''blackjacking'' civilians--a mainstay of the previous three installments.[[/note]], and giving players who broke these rules an automatic GameOver. In traditional immersive sim design, a game should end with the player character's death, or with a NonStandardGameOver that is very tightly woven into the narrative. While an immersive sim certainly could force nonviolent play, this would traditionally be done by just not giving the player any weapons (or by making combat prohibitively difficult), whereas Garrett always carries a sword, a dagger, and/or arrows whose usage the rules inorganically restrict.[[note]]And while Garrett can't reliably beat even a single sentry in sword-to-sword combat on any difficulty level, he's no slouch when it comes to archery or ambushes, provided that he has an open escape route.[[/note]]

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* The ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series (1998-present) is universally considered one of the genre-codifying titles[[note]]For the first three installments, at least[[/note]]. This is due to its highly systems-based stealth gameplay, its organic problem-solving elements, and its sprawling, open-ended levels that can be navigated in many ways. levels]. However, all four titles in the series deviate from traditional immersive sim conventions, at least on their higher difficulty levels, conventions by restricting the player's ability to use violence[[note]]In violence with auttomatic GameOvers based on difficulty level[[note]]In the first two games, the "Hard" difficulty proscribed the killing of civilians while "Expert" mode forbade the player from killing any human beings at all. ''Deadly Shadows'' toned it down by only forbidding killing innocents only innocents, in "Expert" mode mode, during story missions--no restrictions whatsoever applied while traversing the hub world--but world. But the reboot brought the restrictions back, with its hardest mode permitting the killing of guards ... but forbidding the player from even ''blackjacking'' civilians--a civilians, a mainstay of the previous three prior installments.[[/note]], and giving players who broke these rules an automatic GameOver.[[/note]]. In traditional immersive sim design, a game should end with the player character's death, or with a NonStandardGameOver that is very tightly woven into the narrative. While an immersive sim certainly could force nonviolent play, this would traditionally be done by just not giving the player any weapons (or by making combat prohibitively difficult), whereas Garrett always carries a sword, a dagger, and/or arrows sword/dagger and arrows, whose usage the rules inorganically restrict.[[note]]And while Garrett can't reliably beat even a single one sentry in sword-to-sword combat on any difficulty level, he's no slouch when it comes to archery or ambushes, provided that he has an open escape route.ambushes.[[/note]]



** ''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge'' (2000, Looking Glass) scaled down the fantasy elements of the first game, such as non-human monsters and maze-like dungeons, in favor of making the City appear and behave more like a realistic urban environment. It also expanded the protagonist Garret's toolset with new technological tools.
** ''VideoGame/ThiefDeadlyShadows'' (2004, Ion Storm Austin) introduced to the series a central hub level, consisting of several districts of the City, from which the plot mission locations are accessed and which are unlocked for exploration gradually as the story progresses. The AI was also dramatically improved compared to the first two games, with alerted guards becoming downright relentless in their searching on the higher difficulty levels. This game also closed the last immersion-breaking gap of the previous games, transforming their shopping screens between missions into an [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration in-universe interaction]]. Paradoxically, the hub-based world design was seen in some respects as a step ''away'' from immersion: the hardware limitations of the time, combined with the game's cross-development for PC and consoles, forced the developers to break the (theoretically interconnected) hub world and all levels into loading zones.[[note]]Modders have since then removed the loading zones from the dedicated "level" maps, but the hub itself remains broken up into separate loading areas.[[/note]][[/index]]

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** ''VideoGame/ThiefIITheMetalAge'' (2000, Looking Glass) scaled down the fantasy elements of the first game, such as non-human monsters and maze-like dungeons, in favor of making the City appear and behave more like a realistic urban environment. It also expanded the protagonist Garret's toolset with new technological tools.
** ''VideoGame/ThiefDeadlyShadows'' (2004, Ion Storm Austin) introduced to the series a central hub level, world consisting of several districts of the City, from which the plot mission missions' locations are accessed accessed, and which are unlocked for exploration gradually as the story progresses. contains some surprisingly involved sidequests of its own. The AI was also dramatically improved compared to the first two games, ramped up, with alerted guards becoming downright relentless in their searching on the higher difficulty levels. This game hunting you. It also closed the last immersion-breaking gap of the previous games, transforming their inter-mission shopping screens between missions into an [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration in-universe interaction]]. interactions]]. Paradoxically, the hub-based world design hub-map was seen in some respects ways as a step ''away'' from immersion: the hardware limitations of the time, combined with plus the game's cross-development for PC and consoles, forced the developers to break up the (theoretically interconnected) hub world and all levels into with loading zones.[[note]]Modders have since then removed the loading zones from the dedicated "level" maps, but the hub itself remains broken up into separate loading areas.[[/note]][[/index]]



* ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' (2007, Creator/{{Crytek}}) and its 2009 stand-alone expansion ''Crysis: Warhead'' are not traditional immersive sims, having more in common with the FirstPersonShooter[[note]]and their sequels are considered sophisticated FirstPersonShooter games at most[[/note]]. However, the sprawling levels of Crysis's first half and almost all of Warhead, the many tools and powers players can use, the absence of artificial failstates (besides a late-game EscortMission), and the first game's UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective[[note]]Abandoned for traditional cutscenes in ''Warhead''[[/note]] reflect the immersive sim ethos. Incidentally, the Nanosuit gives its wearer powers reminiscent of JC Denton's augmentations.
* ''VideoGame/DarkMessiah'' (2006, Creator/ArkaneStudios) was designed as a spiritual successor to ''VideoGame/ArxFatalis'' and has many of Arkane's signature touches: highly-reactive environments which encourage the player to be a CombatPragmatist, branching skill trees, and gleeful use of the Source physics engine. It was by far Arkane's most purely action-focused game until 2019's ''VideoGame/WolfensteinYoungblood'', which puts it in a ''VideoGame/BioShock1''-esque limbo of being either a very reactive action game with RPG elements, or a mechanically minimalist immersive sim.
* ''VideoGame/DeadSpace'' (2008, Creator/ElectronicArts) is sometimes included on lists of immersive sims for its atmospherics, its level design, its memorably involved combat mechanics, and its unusual synthesis of a DiegeticInterface with a third-person perspective. This classification is controversial, however -- probably the most controversial entry on this list -- and none of its sequels are labeled as immersive sims by anyone.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' (2007, Creator/{{Crytek}}) and its 2009 stand-alone expansion ''Crysis: Warhead'' are not traditional immersive sims, having have much more in common with the FirstPersonShooter[[note]]and their sequels are considered sophisticated FirstPersonShooter games at most[[/note]]. most[[/note]] than with immersive sims. However, the sprawling levels of Crysis's first half and of almost all of Warhead, the many tools and powers players can use, flexible Nanosuit powers, the absence of artificial failstates (besides a late-game EscortMission), and the first game's UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective[[note]]Abandoned for traditional cutscenes in ''Warhead''[[/note]] reflect the immersive sim sim's ethos. Incidentally, the Nanosuit gives its wearer powers reminiscent of JC Denton's augmentations.
* ''VideoGame/DarkMessiah'' (2006, Creator/ArkaneStudios) was designed made as a spiritual successor to ''VideoGame/ArxFatalis'' and has many of Arkane's signature touches: highly-reactive reactive environments which encourage the player to be a CombatPragmatist, branching skill trees, and gleeful use of the Source physics engine. It was by far Arkane's most purely action-focused game until 2019's ''VideoGame/WolfensteinYoungblood'', which puts it in a ''VideoGame/BioShock1''-esque limbo of being either a very reactive action game with RPG elements, or a mechanically minimalist immersive sim.
* ''VideoGame/DeadSpace'' (2008, Creator/ElectronicArts) is sometimes included on lists of immersive sims for its atmospherics, its level design, its memorably involved combat mechanics, and its unusual synthesis of a DiegeticInterface with a third-person perspective. This classification is controversial, however -- probably the most controversial entry on this list -- and none of its sequels are labeled as considered immersive sims by anyone.



* ''VideoGame/FarCry2'' (2007, Creator/{{Ubisoft}}) is an open-world FirstPersonShooter that has, as of 2020, earned the "Immersive Sim" tag on the Steam Store. It embraces immersive sim conventions like UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective, a DiegeticInterface-style world map, and an atmospheric, highly reactive environment[[note]]You want to clear out a machine gun emplacement with a flamethrower? In the African savanna? During the dry season? You'd better be ready to run[[/note]]. Even its polarizing experimental mechanics, like its malaria system, its total lack of a targeting reticle, and weapon degradation, evoke the immersive sim philosophy. Unfortunately, while its world is reactive, it lacks ''persistency''[[note]]Most egregious is its habit of respawning enemies at locations that your character had just "cleared out" minutes prior[[/note]], and it loses more points for the unscaleable rock formations cluttering its map, that can make the sandbox feel paradoxically linear.

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* ''VideoGame/FarCry2'' (2007, (2008, Creator/{{Ubisoft}}) is an open-world FirstPersonShooter that has, as of 2020, earned the "Immersive Sim" tag on the Steam Store. It embraces immersive sim conventions like UnbrokenFirstPersonPerspective, a DiegeticInterface-style world in-game map, and an atmospheric, highly reactive environment[[note]]You want to wanna clear out a machine gun emplacement with a flamethrower? In the an African savanna? During the dry season? You'd better be ready to run[[/note]]. run like hell[[/note]]. Even its polarizing experimental mechanics, like its mechanics -- the malaria system, its the total lack of a targeting reticle, and the weapon degradation, degradation -- evoke the immersive sim philosophy. Unfortunately, while its world is reactive, it lacks ''persistency''[[note]]Most egregious is its habit of respawning enemies at locations that your character had just "cleared out" minutes prior[[/note]], and it loses more points for the unscaleable rock formations cluttering its map, that can make the sandbox feel paradoxically linear.



* ''[[VideoGame/Hitman2016 Hitman]]'' (2016, Creator/IOInteractive) transplants the series' core stealth assassination gameplay into a highly systemic setting, governed by global rules and combinable mechanics set in vast, nonlinear maps, very much like in many of the best immersive sims. It breaks from genre conventions by being entirely third-person, however, and relies on scripting[[note]]although sometimes very intricate, naturalistic-seeming scripting[[/note]] to maintain the series's tradition of [[MakeItLookLikeAnAccident "signature" kills]]. Beyond genre trappings, the maps are also perhaps the closest adaptation of Warren Specter’s early concept of the immersive sim as a highly detailed single block of a city where every person goes about realistic lives off of advanced programming. This is also true of its sequels' ''VideoGame/Hitman2'' and ''VideoGame/Hitman3'' as they share identical engines, and therefore, identical AI routines.
** 2006's ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'' has a more downplayed variation, as the limitations of the technology of the time didn't allow the game to be as nearly as expansive as the games are now. For the time, the levels being significantly more open than those of the first three games, Agent 47 being able to move through the environment more freely, multiple ways to complete objectives, and even tried to create a cause-and-effect relationship between levels with its "Infamy" system[[note]]Make a mess or leave too many witnesses during a hit, and the guards at the next level will be more likely to see through your disguises[[/note]].

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* ''[[VideoGame/Hitman2016 Hitman]]'' (2016, Creator/IOInteractive) transplants the series' core stealth assassination gameplay into a highly systemic setting, governed by global rules and combinable mechanics set in vast, nonlinear maps, very much like in many of the best immersive sims. It breaks from genre conventions by being entirely third-person, however, and relies on scripting[[note]]although sometimes very intricate, naturalistic-seeming scripting[[/note]] to maintain the series's tradition of [[MakeItLookLikeAnAccident "signature" kills]]. Beyond genre trappings, the The maps are also perhaps the closest adaptation of Warren Specter’s early concept of the immersive sim as a highly detailed single block of a city where every person goes about realistic lives off of advanced programming. This is also true of its sequels' ''VideoGame/Hitman2'' and ''VideoGame/Hitman3'' as they share identical engines, and therefore, identical near-identical AI routines.
routines. What changes there are ''add'' to immersion: hiding in a crowd now conceals 47 from guards who'd otherwise recognize him. It breaks from genre conventions by being third-person, however, and it relies on scripting[[note]]although sometimes very intricate, naturalistic-seeming scripting[[/note]] to maintain the series's tradition of [[MakeItLookLikeAnAccident "signature" kills]]
** 2006's ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'' has a more downplayed variation, as ''VideoGame/HitmanBloodMoney'', due to the limitations of the technology of the time didn't allow the game to be as nearly time's technological limitations, wasn't as expansive as the games are now. For the time, However, the levels being significantly more open than those of the first three games, Agent are quite open, 47 being able to move through the environment more freely, always has multiple ways to complete objectives, and it even tried to create a cause-and-effect relationship between levels with its "Infamy" system[[note]]Make a mess or leave too many witnesses during a hit, and the guards at the next level will be more likely to see through your disguises[[/note]].suspicious of you[[/note]].



* ''[[VideoGame/NeonStruct Neon Struct: Die Augen der Welt]]'' (2015, Minor Key Games) can be described as a minimalist, miniature, synthwave-styled tribute to ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' with a greatly increased emphasis on stealth, and a shadow-based system reminiscent of ''Thief's''[[note]]The HUD has a Light Gem-like indicator of how visible you are.[[/note]].
* ''VideoGame/TheOccupation'' (2019, White Paper Games) brings the immersive sim to a more down-to-earth setting, putting you in the shoes of an investigative journalist/whistleblower nosing around a government office building in a slightly dystopian 1980s London. Besides boasting immersive sim's usual dynamic AI, heavy exploration, and organic approaches to obstacles, ''The Occupation'' adds the unusual step of applying a hard, real-world four-hour time limit: If you start a game, get distracted, and forget to pause it, then the game's story can end with your character having dawdled and smoked cigarettes on an office balcony.

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* ''[[VideoGame/NeonStruct Neon Struct: Die Augen der Welt]]'' (2015, Minor Key Games) can be described as a minimalist, miniature, synthwave-styled tribute to ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' with a greatly increased much greater emphasis on stealth, and a shadow-based system reminiscent of ''Thief's''[[note]]The HUD has a Light Gem-like indicator of how visible you are.[[/note]].
* ''VideoGame/TheOccupation'' (2019, White Paper Games) brings the immersive sim to a more down-to-earth setting, slightly dystopian 1980s London, putting you in the shoes of an investigative journalist/whistleblower nosing around a government governmental office building in a slightly dystopian 1980s London. building. Besides boasting immersive sim's the usual dynamic AI, heavy exploration, and organic approaches to obstacles, ''The Occupation'' adds the an unusual step of applying element: a hard, real-world four-hour time limit: limit. If you start a game, get distracted, and forget to pause it, then the game's story can end ends with your character having dawdled and smoked smoking cigarettes on an office the balcony.



* While the ''VideoGame/SplinterCell'' series (2002-ongoing, Creator/{{Ubisoft}}) as a whole does ''not'' belong to the immersive sim family, its third installment, ''Chaos Theory'' (2005), comes very close for a third-person game. It kept the first two games' uncompromising demands that the player use stealth, but gave Sam Fisher a much more varied arsenal of tools and weapons[[note]]Plus the option to choose between several load-outs pre-mission[[/note]], and had a fairly nonlinear level design[[note]]the bank heist level in Panama City is a particularly good example of this[[/note]], with players routinely having multiple ways to complete objectives, in multiple orders[[note]]With the manner in which previous objectives were completed sometimes influencing whether or not subsequent ones would be given[[/note]]. This was a dramatic change from the first two games, which were not just linear but often had only one "correct" way to proceed, making them akin to puzzle games. It also offered systemicity beyond any of the prior or subsequent titles[[note]]Sam can often manipulate environmental light and noise levels, and while previous titles would give you an automatic GameOver if you raised the alarm too many times, now guards just don body armor, toss flares around, and start firing wildly[[/note]]. It also allowed the player to screw up but still finish the level[[note]]Kill a merchant captain before you interrogate him on a target passenger's location? Well, the target is still somewhere on board, so you can just hunt him down yourself[[/note]]: while Sam's superiors berate him if he gets needlessly violent, there are only a few levels where the game, with plot-relevant justifications, fails you should you kill someone.

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* While the The ''VideoGame/SplinterCell'' series (2002-ongoing, (2002-2013, Creator/{{Ubisoft}}) as a whole does ''not'' belong to the immersive sim family, but its third installment, ''Chaos Theory'' (2005), comes very close for a third-person game. close. It kept the first two games' uncompromising demands that the player use stealth, but gave Sam Fisher a much far more varied arsenal of tools and weapons[[note]]Plus the option to choose between several load-outs pre-mission[[/note]], and had a fairly loadouts pre-mission[[/note]]. It also introduced nonlinear level design[[note]]the bank heist level in Panama City is being a particularly good example of this[[/note]], with example[[/note]], and gave players routinely having multiple ways to complete objectives, in multiple orders[[note]]With the objectives[[note]]The manner in which previous objectives were completed sometimes influencing affects whether or not subsequent ones would will be given[[/note]]. This was a dramatic change from the first two games, which were not just linear but often had only one "correct" way to proceed, making them akin to puzzle games. It also offered systemicity beyond any of the prior or subsequent titles[[note]]Sam can nearly abandoned artificial fail-states: while in earlier games raising too many alarms often manipulate environmental light and noise levels, and while previous titles would give you meant an automatic GameOver if you raised the alarm too many times, now guards just don body armor, toss flares around, and start firing wildly[[/note]]. It also allowed GameOver, the player to may now screw up but and still finish the level[[note]]Kill levels[[note]]Killed a merchant ship's captain before you interrogate without interrogating him on about a target passenger's location? Well, the target is still somewhere on board, so you can ''somewhere'' onboard; you'll just have to hunt him down yourself[[/note]]: while yourself. Wrought havoc during the bank heist? You can still get out, provided you can handle the Panamanian Army's reinforcements[[/note]]. With these changes came much-improved AI: as the alarm level rises, panicking guards will begin donning armor, fixing lights onto their flak vests, tossing flares, and firing wildly into shadows. Sam's superiors berate him if should he gets get needlessly violent, there are but only a few levels where the game, with plot-relevant justifications, fails few, plot-justified times will killing fail you should you kill someone.a mission.



* ''VideoGame/{{Subnautica}}'' (2018, Unknown Worlds Entertainment) is a rare SurvivalSandbox game to ''not'' be procedurally generated, but rather to offer vast, intricately-designed sandbox, with elements reminiscent of MetroidVania. Setpieces are few and far between, the developers went to great lengths to create multiple consistent underwater biomes, object permanence is a core gameplay mechanic, and while the diving system is jam-packed with AcceptableBreaksFromReality[[note]]the player character can survive depths that would kill a real human (and will indeed destroy an un-upgraded submersible's hull), the planet's two immense moons exert no tidal forces, underwater visibility is much greater than it would be in real life, and decompression sickness apparently does not exist[[/note]] but these decisions ultimately contribute to a uniquely immersive gameworld.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Subnautica}}'' (2018, Unknown Worlds Entertainment) is more often considered a rare SurvivalSandbox game to ''not'' be procedurally generated, SurvivalSandbox, but rather to offer vast, intricately-designed sandbox, with elements reminiscent of MetroidVania. it can just as easily be called an immersive sim. Setpieces are few and far between, the developers went to great lengths to create multiple consistent underwater biomes, between and ''never'' interrupt gameplay, object permanence is a core gameplay mechanic, and while the diving system is jam-packed with AcceptableBreaksFromReality[[note]]the player character can survive depths that would kill a real human (and will indeed destroy an un-upgraded submersible's hull), the planet's two immense moons exert no tidal forces, underwater visibility is much greater than it would be in real life, and decompression sickness apparently does the bends, bane of real-wold divers, not exist[[/note]] but these decisions ultimately contribute to a uniquely an immersive gameworld.gameworld. It also is a rare SurvivalSandbox ''not'' to have been procedurally generated; rather, the developers created numerous intricately designed underwater biomes, each of which organically encourages the player to adopt different strategies.


* ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventuresNeverlootedDungeon'' (TBD, Wild Mage Games) is an upcoming Dungeon Crawler with an emphasis on treacherous deadly traps, with a strong immersive sim design phisolophy. The public demo released during the Steam Game Festival Autumn 2020 showed great promises of open-ended problem solving and physics-based interactivity.

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* ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventuresNeverlootedDungeon'' (TBD, Wild Mage Games) is an upcoming Dungeon Crawler with an emphasis on treacherous deadly traps, with a strong immersive sim design phisolophy.philosophy. The public demo released during the Steam Game Festival Autumn 2020 showed great promises of open-ended problem solving and physics-based interactivity.


* ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventures:NeverlootedDungeon'' (TBD, Wild Mage Games) is an upcoming Dungeon Crawler with an emphasis on treacherous deadly traps, with a strong immersive sim design phisolophy. The public demo released during the Steam Game Festival Autumn 2020 showed great promises of open-ended problem solving and physics-based interactivity.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventures:NeverlootedDungeon'' ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventuresNeverlootedDungeon'' (TBD, Wild Mage Games) is an upcoming Dungeon Crawler with an emphasis on treacherous deadly traps, with a strong immersive sim design phisolophy. The public demo released during the Steam Game Festival Autumn 2020 showed great promises of open-ended problem solving and physics-based interactivity.


* ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventuresNeverlootedDungeon'' (TBD, Wild Mage Games) is an upcoming Dungeon Crawler with an emphasis on treacherous deadly traps, with a strong immersive sim design phisolophy. The public demo released during the Steam Game Festival Autumn 2020 showed great promises of open-ended problem solving and physics-based interactivity.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventuresNeverlootedDungeon'' ''VideoGame/AlmostEpicAdventures:NeverlootedDungeon'' (TBD, Wild Mage Games) is an upcoming Dungeon Crawler with an emphasis on treacherous deadly traps, with a strong immersive sim design phisolophy. The public demo released during the Steam Game Festival Autumn 2020 showed great promises of open-ended problem solving and physics-based interactivity.

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