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The American South (the former Confederate States of America), settled by Englishmen and Scots rather than Germans, Scandinavians, and Irishmen, is similar to FlyoverCountry but not exactly identical, and is sometimes treated as Flyover Country in media, sometimes not. For information on the Southern lowlands, settled by the West Country English (and by Africans they imported as slaves), see DeepSouth; for the Southern highlands, settled by the Scotch-Irish, see UsefulNotes/{{Appalachia}}.

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The American South (the former Confederate States of America), settled by Englishmen and Scots rather than Germans, Scandinavians, and Irishmen, is similar to FlyoverCountry Flyover Country but not exactly identical, and is sometimes treated as Flyover Country in media, sometimes not. For information on the Southern lowlands, settled by the West Country English (and by Africans they imported as slaves), see DeepSouth; for the Southern highlands, settled by the Scotch-Irish, see UsefulNotes/{{Appalachia}}.


The rough UsefulNotes/{{Australia}}n equivalent to FlyoverCountry is the Outback or, more broadly, the areas outside the "capital cities".

The American South (the former Confederate States of America), settled by Englishmen and Scots rather than Germans, Scandinavians, and Irishmen, is similar to FlyoverCountry but not exactly identical, and is sometimes treated as FlyoverCountry in media, sometimes not. For information on the Southern lowlands, settled by the West Country English (and by Africans they imported as slaves), see DeepSouth; for the Southern highlands, settled by the Scotch-Irish, see UsefulNotes/{{Appalachia}}.

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The rough UsefulNotes/{{Australia}}n equivalent to FlyoverCountry Flyover Country is the Outback or, more broadly, the areas outside the "capital cities".

The American South (the former Confederate States of America), settled by Englishmen and Scots rather than Germans, Scandinavians, and Irishmen, is similar to FlyoverCountry but not exactly identical, and is sometimes treated as FlyoverCountry Flyover Country in media, sometimes not. For information on the Southern lowlands, settled by the West Country English (and by Africans they imported as slaves), see DeepSouth; for the Southern highlands, settled by the Scotch-Irish, see UsefulNotes/{{Appalachia}}.


** Peoria: Seen, for some reason, as ''the'' quintessential [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere dull, banal Middle American city]]. The phrase [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_it_play_in_Peoria%3F "will it play in Peoria?"]] emerged in the {{vaudeville}} era to describe an act that would have mass appeal nationwide, especially in the heartland (Peoria was a major stop for many vaudeville performers), and later became popular among marketers, politicians, and pollsters. Starting in TheSixties, it became a major test market, and to this day most American focus groups are based in the city (which is a rather outdated notion, as it now Missouri, not Illinois, that marks the official U.S. population center).

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** Peoria: Seen, for some reason, as ''the'' quintessential [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere dull, banal Middle American city]]. The phrase [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_it_play_in_Peoria%3F "will it play in Peoria?"]] emerged in the {{vaudeville}} era to describe an act that would have mass appeal nationwide, especially in the heartland (Peoria was a major stop for many vaudeville performers), and later became popular among marketers, politicians, and pollsters. Starting in TheSixties, it became a major test market, and to this day most American focus groups are based in the city (which is a rather outdated notion, as it now Missouri, not Illinois, that marks the official U.S. population center).



** UsefulNotes/{{Indianapolis}}: Home of the Indy 500. And in recent times, home of Peyton Manning’s team.
** Muncie: A small Midwestern city that, not unlike Peoria, would be another obscure burg if not for its very "averageness" turning it into a hotbed of sociological research. The husband-and-wife team of Robert and Helen Lynd selected it for their [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middletown_studies "Middletown studies"]] in the 1920s and '30s, and since then it's become a popular subject for pollsters and follow-up studies.

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** UsefulNotes/{{Indianapolis}}: Home of the Indy 500. And in recent times, home of Peyton Manning’s team.
Creator/PeytonManning’s team (though he would finish his NFL career in Denver).
** Muncie: A small Midwestern city that, not unlike Peoria, would be another obscure burg if not for its very "averageness" turning it into a hotbed of sociological research. The husband-and-wife team of Robert and Helen Lynd selected it for their [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middletown_studies "Middletown studies"]] in the 1920s and '30s, and since then it's become a popular subject for pollsters and follow-up studies.



** UsefulNotes/StLouis: Once one of America's premiere cities, it's since become a poster child for urban decay. Home to the Cardinals, the Gateway Arch, Lambert International Airport, and it's own unique forms of pizza and barbecue. Hosted the 1904 Summer Olympics for some reason. Residents hate those from Kansas City and/or Chicago.
** UsefulNotes/KansasCity: Chicago's less-attractive little sister. Baseball, barbecue, jazz music, and organized crime galore. Known for it's high incomes, large meatpacking industry, and endless mess of suburban sprawl.

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** UsefulNotes/StLouis: Once one of America's premiere premier cities, it's since become a poster child for urban decay. Home to the Cardinals, the Gateway Arch, Lambert International Airport, and it's its own unique forms of pizza and barbecue. Hosted the 1904 Summer Olympics for some reason. Residents hate those from Kansas City and/or Chicago.
** UsefulNotes/KansasCity: Chicago's less-attractive little sister. Baseball, barbecue, jazz music, and organized crime galore. Known for it's its high incomes, large meatpacking industry, and endless mess of suburban sprawl.



** Madison: More Beer, the Badgers, a metric ton of restaurants and bars, and hippies. 'The Boy Who Drank Too Much' was largely filmed here. Some exterior shots in ''Film/BackToSchool'' were as well. Former home of both Clyde Stubblefield and a [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar Civil War POW camp]].
** Green Bay: [[SerialEscalation Even More Beer]], snow, and the Packers. Oldest continuously inhabited French settlement in the US, founded 1634.

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** Madison: More Beer, the Badgers, a metric ton of restaurants and bars, and hippies. 'The ''The Boy Who Drank Too Much' Much'' was largely filmed here. Some exterior shots in ''Film/BackToSchool'' were as well. Former home of both Clyde Stubblefield and a [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar Civil War POW camp]].
** Green Bay: [[SerialEscalation Even More Beer]], snow, and [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague the Packers.Packers]]. Oldest continuously inhabited French settlement in the US, founded 1634.



** [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis and St. Paul]]: A strange blend of West Coast weirdness and Midwestern friendliness. The main business center between Chicago and Seattle and home to a massive theater scene and a thriving Somali community, as well as a major airline hub and the only 24-hour rapid transit system outside of New York or Chicago. Do not get stuck there in the winter unless you like slowly freezing to death.

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** [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis and St. Paul]]: A strange blend of West Coast weirdness and Midwestern friendliness. The main business center between Chicago and Seattle and home to a massive theater scene and a thriving Somali community, as well as a major airline hub and the only 24-hour rapid transit system outside of New York York, Chicago, or Chicago.Philly. Do not get stuck there in the winter unless you like slowly freezing to death.



** Omaha: A smallish, somewhat isolated city used as shorthand for "city in the middle of nowhere", i.e. that podunk town far, ''faaaaar'' away from everything you know and love that you're forced to move to because it was the only job you could find. (See also: Des Moines, Iowa.) Which isn't uncalled-for. Firstly, Omaha has a strong job market, anchored by four Fortune 500 companies and a large high-tech sector, and Secondly, it's a long way from anywhere: a three hour drive to Kansas City, seven and a half to Denver, eight to Chicago, two whole days to New York City, and ''three days'' to Los Angeles. Omaha has featured in a few movies, mostly thanks to native son [[Creator/AlexanderPayne Alexander Payne]]. Also home to [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks the Strategic]] [[UsefulNotes/PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower Air Command.]]

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** Omaha: A smallish, somewhat isolated city used as shorthand for "city in the middle of nowhere", i.e. that podunk town far, ''faaaaar'' away from everything you know and love that you're forced to move to because it was the only job you could find. (See also: Des Moines, Iowa.) Which isn't uncalled-for. uncalled for. Firstly, Omaha has a strong job market, anchored by four Fortune 500 companies and a large high-tech sector, sector; and Secondly, secondly, it's a long way from anywhere: a three hour three-hour drive to Kansas City, seven and a half to Denver, eight to Chicago, two whole days to New York City, and ''three days'' to Los Angeles. Omaha has featured in a few movies, mostly thanks to native son [[Creator/AlexanderPayne Alexander Payne]]. Also home to [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks the Strategic]] [[UsefulNotes/PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower Air Command.]]



* UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}: Despite being located quite far from the Midwest, most stereotypes of the state, and of UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}}s in general, are essentially [[MinnesotaNice Midwestern]] [[StepfordSmiler stereotypes]] cranked UpToEleven. Mormonism did indeed spend many of its formative years in the Midwest,[[note]]Specifically, in Jackson, Clay, and Caldwell Counties in Missouri, and later in Nauvoo, Illinois. It originated in upstate New York[[/note]] before heading to what's now Utah in search of a land without a pre-existing population to disapprove of their religion (at that point Utah was part of Mexico and home to a few scattered indigenous tribes). Like the Upper Midwest, many of the early Mormon converts who settled in Utah came from Scandinavia.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}: Despite being located quite far from the Midwest, most stereotypes of the state, and of UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}}s UsefulNotes/{{Mormon|ism}}s in general, are essentially [[MinnesotaNice Midwestern]] [[StepfordSmiler stereotypes]] cranked UpToEleven. Mormonism did indeed spend many of its formative years in the Midwest,[[note]]Specifically, in Jackson, Clay, and Caldwell Counties in Missouri, and later in Nauvoo, Illinois. It originated in upstate New York[[/note]] York.[[/note]] before heading to what's now Utah in search of a land without a pre-existing population to disapprove of their religion (at that point Utah was part of Mexico and home to a few scattered indigenous tribes). Like the Upper Midwest, many of the early Mormon converts who settled in Utah came from Scandinavia.


** UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} - The butt of many jokes due to its urban decay. That and [[NeverLiveItDown the river]] [[EpicFail caught fire once]].

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** UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} - The butt of many jokes due to its being considered the original urban decay.decay example in the country. That and [[NeverLiveItDown the river]] [[EpicFail caught fire once]].


That's Flyover Country, also known as "the Heartland" or "Middle America" [[note]] which are not necessarily the same thing; see YouKeepUsingThatWord for further details [[/note]]--American slang for the states which trendy liberal coast-dwellers see only from the window of an airplane. Containing roughly half the country's population (if you're using a narrower definition) but much more of its landmass, this region includes everything between UsefulNotes/LasVegas [[note]] although the area between the Sierra Nevadas and the Rockies is more properly termed "the Great Basin" and is culturally either Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Mormon, in marked contrast to the largely German Protestant or Scandinavian Lutheran character of the upper Midwest, Slavic and Italian Catholic character of the Great Lakes, the Scots-Irish Baptist or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the lower Midwest, Slavic Jewish or Southern European and Germanic Catholic character of the East Coast, Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the West Coast, and the Scots-Irish and West African Baptist character of the South. [[/note]] and UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} at a minimum--and is often extended to everything east of the Sierra Nevada and [[Series/ThirtyRock west of the Alleghenies]] (if not the Hudson River).

Sparsely populated, largely rural, and lacking in photogenic glamor, it rarely shows up in works which attempt to appear trendy or up-to-date. It gets much more play in political circles, however, as the quirks of the American electoral system make appeals to smaller states essential. When one talks about the "red state/blue state" divide in American politics, this is what is meant by "red state"--conservative-leaning rural/suburban areas where UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}, chain restaurants, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches church]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school football]], and the Republican Party are pillars of local communities. The phrase "flyover country" was, in fact, coined by right-wing [[TalkShow talk radio]] hosts, to ridicule their imagined concept of what coastal liberal elites thought of the American interior.

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That's Flyover Country, also known as "the Heartland" or "Middle America" [[note]] which are not necessarily the same thing; see YouKeepUsingThatWord for further details [[/note]]--American slang for the states which trendy liberal coast-dwellers see only from the window of an airplane. Containing roughly half the country's population (if you're using a narrower definition) but much more of its landmass, this region includes everything between UsefulNotes/LasVegas [[note]] although the area between the Sierra Nevadas and the Rockies is more properly termed "the Great Basin" and is culturally either Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Mormon, in marked contrast to the largely German Protestant or Scandinavian Lutheran character of the upper Midwest, Slavic and Italian Catholic character of the Great Lakes, the Scots-Irish Baptist or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the lower Midwest, Slavic Jewish or Southern European and Germanic Catholic character of the East Coast, Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the West Coast, and the Scots-Irish and West African Baptist character of the South. [[/note]] and UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} at a minimum--and is often extended to everything east of the Sierra Nevada and [[Series/ThirtyRock west of the Alleghenies]] (if not the Hudson River).

River). [[https://images.fineartamerica.com/images/artworkimages/mediumlarge/1/the-new-yorker-cover-march-29th-1976-saul-steinberg.jpg This famous (and oft-parodied) Saul Steinberg cover]] for ''The New Yorker'' magazine's March 29, 1976 issue, known as "View of the World from 9th Avenue", parodies the stereotypical attitude of parochial New Yorkers to the rest of the country.

Sparsely populated, largely rural, and lacking in photogenic glamor, it rarely shows up in works which attempt to appear trendy or up-to-date. It gets much more play in political circles, however, as the quirks of the American electoral system make appeals to smaller states essential. When one talks about the "red state/blue state" divide in American politics, this is what is meant by "red state"--conservative-leaning state" -- conservative-leaning rural/suburban areas where UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}, chain restaurants, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches church]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school football]], and the Republican Party are pillars of local communities. The phrase "flyover country" was, in fact, coined by right-wing [[TalkShow talk radio]] hosts, to ridicule their imagined concept of what coastal liberal elites thought of the American interior.


That's Flyover Country, also known as "the Heartland" or "Middle America" [[note]] which are not necessarily the same thing; see YouKeepUsingThatWord for further details [[/note]] -- American slang for the states which trendy liberal coast-dwellers see only from the window of an airplane. Containing roughly half the country's population (if you're using a narrower definition) but much more of its landmass, this region includes everything between UsefulNotes/LasVegas [[note]] although the area between the Sierra Nevadas and the Rockies is more properly termed "the Great Basin" and is culturally either Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Mormon, in marked contrast to the largely German Protestant or Scandinavian Lutheran character of the upper Midwest, Slavic and Italian Catholic character of the Great Lakes, the Scots-Irish Baptist or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the lower Midwest, Slavic Jewish or Southern European and Germanic Catholic character of the East Coast, Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the West Coast, and the Scots-Irish and West African Baptist character of the South. [[/note]] and UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} at a minimum -- and is often extended to everything east of the Sierra Nevada and [[Series/ThirtyRock west of the Alleghenies]] (if not the Hudson River).

Sparsely populated, largely rural, and lacking in photogenic glamor, it rarely shows up in works which attempt to appear trendy or up-to-date. It gets much more play in political circles, however, as the quirks of the American electoral system make appeals to smaller states essential. When one talks about the "red state/blue state" divide in American politics, this is what is meant by "red state" -- conservative-leaning rural/suburban areas where UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}, chain restaurants, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches church]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school football]], and the Republican Party are pillars of local communities. The phrase "flyover country" was, in fact, coined by right-wing [[TalkShow talk radio]] hosts, to ridicule their imagined concept of what coastal liberal elites thought of the American interior.

Setting a show or a novel here can be shorthand for [[TheFifties '50s-style]] [[TheFundamentalist social conservatism]] [[StopBeingStereotypical (and the common portrayal of this region by Hollywood in the actual Fifties did nothing to help)]], [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere small-town insularity]], or [[PlaceWorseThanDeath a crushingly unhip, even dorky ambiance]] -- think ''Film/{{Pleasantville}}'' or ''Film/NapoleonDynamite''. However, it gets used at least as often to inspire {{nostalgia|Filter}} for {{Eagleland}} Flavor #1, a friendly, down-home environment full of old-time family values where [[Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion all the women are strong, all the men are good-lookin' and all the children are above average]].[[note]]It should be noted that the above slogan is used by humorist Garrison Keillor to describe the fictional town of Lake Wobegon, which is in the state of Minnesota -- which, amusingly, is usually considered a solidly ''blue'' state ([[BlackSheep Michele Bachmann]] -- who represents a carefully gerrymandered district -- notwithstanding).[[/note]] (Think ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', ''Series/FridayNightLights'', or an '80s [[Creator/StevenSpielberg Spielberg]]/Amblin movie.)

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That's Flyover Country, also known as "the Heartland" or "Middle America" [[note]] which are not necessarily the same thing; see YouKeepUsingThatWord for further details [[/note]] -- American [[/note]]--American slang for the states which trendy liberal coast-dwellers see only from the window of an airplane. Containing roughly half the country's population (if you're using a narrower definition) but much more of its landmass, this region includes everything between UsefulNotes/LasVegas [[note]] although the area between the Sierra Nevadas and the Rockies is more properly termed "the Great Basin" and is culturally either Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Mormon, in marked contrast to the largely German Protestant or Scandinavian Lutheran character of the upper Midwest, Slavic and Italian Catholic character of the Great Lakes, the Scots-Irish Baptist or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the lower Midwest, Slavic Jewish or Southern European and Germanic Catholic character of the East Coast, Latin American Catholic or Anglo-Saxon Protestant character of the West Coast, and the Scots-Irish and West African Baptist character of the South. [[/note]] and UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} at a minimum -- and minimum--and is often extended to everything east of the Sierra Nevada and [[Series/ThirtyRock west of the Alleghenies]] (if not the Hudson River).

Sparsely populated, largely rural, and lacking in photogenic glamor, it rarely shows up in works which attempt to appear trendy or up-to-date. It gets much more play in political circles, however, as the quirks of the American electoral system make appeals to smaller states essential. When one talks about the "red state/blue state" divide in American politics, this is what is meant by "red state" -- conservative-leaning state"--conservative-leaning rural/suburban areas where UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}, chain restaurants, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches church]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school football]], and the Republican Party are pillars of local communities. The phrase "flyover country" was, in fact, coined by right-wing [[TalkShow talk radio]] hosts, to ridicule their imagined concept of what coastal liberal elites thought of the American interior.

Setting a show or a novel here can be shorthand for [[TheFifties '50s-style]] [[TheFundamentalist social conservatism]] [[StopBeingStereotypical (and the common portrayal of this region by Hollywood in the actual Fifties did nothing to help)]], [[NothingExcitingEverHappensHere small-town insularity]], or [[PlaceWorseThanDeath a crushingly unhip, even dorky ambiance]] -- think ''Film/{{Pleasantville}}'' or ''Film/NapoleonDynamite''. However, it gets used at least as often to inspire {{nostalgia|Filter}} for {{Eagleland}} Flavor #1, a friendly, down-home environment full of old-time family values where [[Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion all the women are strong, all the men are good-lookin' and all the children are above average]].[[note]]It should be noted that the above slogan is used by humorist Garrison Keillor to describe the fictional town of Lake Wobegon, which is in the state of Minnesota -- which, Minnesota--which, amusingly, is usually considered a solidly ''blue'' state ([[BlackSheep Michele Bachmann]] -- who Bachmann]]--who represents a carefully gerrymandered district -- notwithstanding).district--notwithstanding).[[/note]] (Think ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', ''Series/FridayNightLights'', or an '80s [[Creator/StevenSpielberg Spielberg]]/Amblin movie.)


Sparsely populated, largely rural, and lacking in photogenic glamor, it rarely shows up in works which attempt to appear trendy or up-to-date. It gets much more play in political circles, however, as the quirks of the American electoral system make appeals to smaller states essential. When one talks about the "red state/blue state" divide in American politics, this is what is meant by "red state" -- conservative-leaning rural/suburban areas where UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}, chain restaurants, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches church]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school football]], and the Republican Party are pillars of local communities. The phrase "flyover country" was, in fact, coined by right-wing [[TalkShow talk radio]] hosts, to ridicule their imagined concept of what coastal liberal elites thought of the American interior. (Although this is only true in certain parts of the midwest; Minnesota, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin are generally considered blue states. The latter two would be better described as purple states than blue, though; both Wisconsin and Michigan's state governments have been largely under Republican control since 2011, and both voted (very narrowly) for Donald Trump in the 2016 Elections)

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Sparsely populated, largely rural, and lacking in photogenic glamor, it rarely shows up in works which attempt to appear trendy or up-to-date. It gets much more play in political circles, however, as the quirks of the American electoral system make appeals to smaller states essential. When one talks about the "red state/blue state" divide in American politics, this is what is meant by "red state" -- conservative-leaning rural/suburban areas where UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}}, chain restaurants, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches church]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school football]], and the Republican Party are pillars of local communities. The phrase "flyover country" was, in fact, coined by right-wing [[TalkShow talk radio]] hosts, to ridicule their imagined concept of what coastal liberal elites thought of the American interior. (Although this is only true in certain parts of the midwest; Minnesota, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin are generally considered blue states. The latter two would be better described as purple states than blue, though; both Wisconsin and Michigan's state governments have been largely under Republican control since 2011, and both voted (very narrowly) for Donald Trump in the 2016 Elections)\n


** Pennsylvania itself has a mini flyover country. The state is often described as "Philly in the east, Pittsburgh in the west, and [[DeepSouth Kentucky/Alabama/]]''Film/{{Deliverance}}'' in between," referring to the large rural zone in the middle of the state where coal mining, farming, and manufacturing make up the economic backbone. The nickname "Pennsyltucky" (or, more politely, "The T"[[note]]If you remove the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh metropolitan areas from Pennsylvania, what you have left is shaped roughly like the letter T. "The T" is used far more in political circles than "Pennysltucky", as the latter can be seen as insulting, especially when used by an [[NWordPrivileges urban politician]].[[/note]]) describes this region with either derision or SelfDeprecation.

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** Pennsylvania itself has a mini flyover country. The state is often described as "Philly in the east, Pittsburgh in the west, and [[DeepSouth Kentucky/Alabama/]]''Film/{{Deliverance}}'' [[UsefulNotes/{{Appalachia}} Kentucky/]][[DeepSouth Alabama/]]''Film/{{Deliverance}}'' in between," referring to the large rural zone in the middle of the state where coal mining, farming, and manufacturing make up the economic backbone. The nickname "Pennsyltucky" (or, more politely, "The T"[[note]]If you remove the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh metropolitan areas from Pennsylvania, what you have left is shaped roughly like the letter T. "The T" is used far more in political circles than "Pennysltucky", as the latter can be seen as insulting, especially when used by an [[NWordPrivileges urban politician]].[[/note]]) describes this region with either derision or SelfDeprecation.


Where do you live? [[BigApplesauce New York]]? Awesome. [[UsefulNotes/LosAngeles L.A.]]? Awesome. UsefulNotes/KansasCity? Uh... where is that, like, in Idaho or something?[[note]] The name is a clue; it's in Missouri, of course. Well, half of it, anyway. There are actually two of them, across from each other in different states on the Missouri River. Usually it's the Missouri one people are referring to rather than the Kansas one.[[/note]]

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Where do you live? [[BigApplesauce New York]]? Awesome. [[UsefulNotes/LosAngeles L.A.]]? Awesome. UsefulNotes/KansasCity? Uh... where is that, like, in Idaho or something?[[note]] The name is a clue; it's in Missouri, of course. Well, half about three quarters of it, anyway. There are actually two of them, across from each other in different states on cities named "Kansas City", with State Line Road marking the Missouri River. division between the two. Usually it's the Missouri one (or the metropolitan area as a whole, including cities like Liberty and Independence on the Missouri side and Overland Park and Shawnee Mission on the Kansas side) people are referring to rather than the Kansas one.[[/note]]


* UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}: Despite being located quite far from the Midwest, most stereotypes of the state, and of UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}}s in general, are essentially [[MinnesotaNice Midwestern]] [[StepfordSmiler stereotypes]] cranked UpToEleven. Mormonism did indeed spend many of its formative years in the Midwest,[[note]]Specifically, in Jackson, Clay, and Caldwell Counties in Missouri, and later in Nauvoo, Illinois. It originated in upstate New York[[/note]] before heading to what's now Utah in search of a land without a pre-existing Christian population to disapprove of their religion. Many of the early Mormon converts in Europe also came from Scandinavia, not unlike the upper Midwest, and moved to Utah soon after.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}: Despite being located quite far from the Midwest, most stereotypes of the state, and of UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}}s in general, are essentially [[MinnesotaNice Midwestern]] [[StepfordSmiler stereotypes]] cranked UpToEleven. Mormonism did indeed spend many of its formative years in the Midwest,[[note]]Specifically, in Jackson, Clay, and Caldwell Counties in Missouri, and later in Nauvoo, Illinois. It originated in upstate New York[[/note]] before heading to what's now Utah in search of a land without a pre-existing Christian population to disapprove of their religion. Many religion (at that point Utah was part of Mexico and home to a few scattered indigenous tribes). Like the Upper Midwest, many of the early Mormon converts who settled in Europe also Utah came from Scandinavia, not unlike the upper Midwest, and moved to Utah soon after.Scandinavia.


Culturally, the flyover region is a lot more diverse in religion and ethnicity than popular folklore tends to credit it. Most people are aware of the large African-American and Latino populations within the cities, but there's more to it than that. For example, the Detroit suburb of Dearborn has had a healthy Arab population for over a century and is home to the largest mosque in North America, and several Native American reservations are located in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Dakotas.

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Culturally, the flyover region is a lot more diverse in religion and ethnicity than popular folklore tends to credit it. Most people are aware of the large African-American and Latino populations within the cities, but there's more to it than that. For example, the Detroit suburb of Dearborn has had a healthy Arab population for over a century and is home to the largest mosque in North America, the Minneapolis-Saint Paul area contains the largest Hmong and Somali communities in the country, and several Native American reservations are located in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Dakotas.


** UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} - The butt of many jokes due to its urban decay. [[NeverLiveItDown The river]] [[EpicFail caught fire once]]

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** UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} - The butt of many jokes due to its urban decay. That and [[NeverLiveItDown The the river]] [[EpicFail caught fire once]]once]].


** [[UsefulNotes/StLouis St. Louis]]: Once one of America's premiere cities, it's since become a poster child for urban decay. Home to the Cardinals, the Gateway Arch, Lambert International Airport, and it's own unique forms of pizza and barbecue. Hosted the 1904 Summer Olympics for some reason. Residents hate those from Kansas City and/or Chicago.
** [[UsefulNotes/KansasCity Kansas City]]: Chicago's less-attractive little sister. Baseball, barbecue, jazz music, and organized crime galore. Known for it's high incomes, large meatpacking industry, and endless mess of suburban sprawl.

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** [[UsefulNotes/StLouis St. Louis]]: UsefulNotes/StLouis: Once one of America's premiere cities, it's since become a poster child for urban decay. Home to the Cardinals, the Gateway Arch, Lambert International Airport, and it's own unique forms of pizza and barbecue. Hosted the 1904 Summer Olympics for some reason. Residents hate those from Kansas City and/or Chicago.
** [[UsefulNotes/KansasCity Kansas City]]: UsefulNotes/KansasCity: Chicago's less-attractive little sister. Baseball, barbecue, jazz music, and organized crime galore. Known for it's high incomes, large meatpacking industry, and endless mess of suburban sprawl.



** Cincinnati: Named after {{Cincinnatus}} and by extension UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, this quaint city doesn’t conform to what a typical Ohio city is. Owing to its proximity to Kentucky and the ensuring cultural impact, Cincy is often called “the northernmost southern city”. In bygone years, it was known as the hub city for the trade of pigs and pork, and was a major stopping point on the Underground Railroad that smuggled slaves out of the South. Consequently it has a very prominent museum dedicated to the Underground Railroad. In modern times, Cincinnati is known for its own special type of chili, the headquarters of GE Aircraft Engines and Procter & Gamble and for NCAA basketball's few intra-city rivalries, between Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati. Oh, and [[Series/WKRPInCincinnati a TV show about a radio station]]].

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** Cincinnati: Named after {{Cincinnatus}} and by extension UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, this quaint city doesn’t conform to what a typical Ohio city is. Owing to its proximity to Kentucky and the ensuring cultural impact, Cincy is often called “the northernmost southern city”. In bygone years, it was known as the hub city for the trade of pigs and pork, and was a major stopping point on the Underground Railroad that smuggled slaves out of the South. Consequently it has a very prominent museum dedicated to the Underground Railroad. In modern times, Cincinnati is known for its own special type of chili, the headquarters of GE Aircraft Engines and Procter & Gamble and for NCAA basketball's few intra-city rivalries, between Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati. Oh, and [[Series/WKRPInCincinnati a TV show about a radio station]]].station]].


** Cincinnati: Named after {{Cincinnatus}} and by extension UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, this quaint city doesn’t conform to what a typical Ohio city is. Owing to its proximity to Kentucky and the ensuring cultural impact, Cincy is often called “the northernmost southern city”. In bygone years, it was known as the hub city for the trade of pigs and pork, and was a major stopping point on the Underground Railroad that smuggled slaves out of the South. Consequently it has a very prominent museum dedicated to the Underground Railroad. In modern times, Cincinnati is known for its own special type of chili, the headquarters of GE Aircraft Engines and Procter & Gamble and for NCAA basketball’s only intra-city rivalry between Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati. Oh, and [[Series/WKRPInCincinnati a TV show about a radio station]]].

to:

** Cincinnati: Named after {{Cincinnatus}} and by extension UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, this quaint city doesn’t conform to what a typical Ohio city is. Owing to its proximity to Kentucky and the ensuring cultural impact, Cincy is often called “the northernmost southern city”. In bygone years, it was known as the hub city for the trade of pigs and pork, and was a major stopping point on the Underground Railroad that smuggled slaves out of the South. Consequently it has a very prominent museum dedicated to the Underground Railroad. In modern times, Cincinnati is known for its own special type of chili, the headquarters of GE Aircraft Engines and Procter & Gamble and for NCAA basketball’s only basketball's few intra-city rivalry rivalries, between Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati. Oh, and [[Series/WKRPInCincinnati a TV show about a radio station]]].


** UsefulNotes/{{Indianapolis}}: Home of the Indy 500.

to:

** UsefulNotes/{{Indianapolis}}: Home of the Indy 500. And in recent times, home of Peyton Manning’s team.


Added DiffLines:

** Cincinnati: Named after {{Cincinnatus}} and by extension UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, this quaint city doesn’t conform to what a typical Ohio city is. Owing to its proximity to Kentucky and the ensuring cultural impact, Cincy is often called “the northernmost southern city”. In bygone years, it was known as the hub city for the trade of pigs and pork, and was a major stopping point on the Underground Railroad that smuggled slaves out of the South. Consequently it has a very prominent museum dedicated to the Underground Railroad. In modern times, Cincinnati is known for its own special type of chili, the headquarters of GE Aircraft Engines and Procter & Gamble and for NCAA basketball’s only intra-city rivalry between Xavier University and the University of Cincinnati. Oh, and [[Series/WKRPInCincinnati a TV show about a radio station]]].

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