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* In an early ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' strip, Dogbert suddenly insists that the world is flat. Dilbert rather weakly tries to use Columbus as an argument against Dogbert's claim (based on the already mentioned erroneous assumption that Columbus "discovered" that the Earth was round). Dogbert's counter-argument is that it's convenient that Dilbert's only witness is dead.

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* In an early a 1989 ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' strip, [[https://dilbert.com/strip/1989-10-09 strip]], Dogbert suddenly insists that the world is flat. Dilbert rather weakly tries to use Columbus as an argument against Dogbert's claim (based on the already mentioned erroneous assumption that Columbus "discovered" that the Earth was round). Dogbert's counter-argument is that it's convenient that Dilbert's only witness is dead. [[https://dilbert.com/strip/1989-10-10 In the next strip,]] Dilbert brings up then-Senator John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth (Yuri Gagarin was the first human, but died in 1968), to which Dogbert retorts that [[AcceptableProfessionalTargets Dilbert's evidence relies on the honesty of politicians]].

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* ''Astonishing Swordsmen and Sorcerers of Hyperborea'' takes place in the titular world, which is flat and wanders through space. It also happens to look like a gigantic hexagon.


* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** As the name suggests, the series takes place on a very slightly convex disc. It's also supported by four giant elephants on the back of an insanely vast turtle. It has a (spherical) tiny sun and a tiny moon, which travel in complex patterns to make seasons. (Sometimes, one of the elephants has to cock a leg to let them go by.)
** ''Discworld/SmallGods'' concerns the bold efforts of the Omnians, religious fanatics who believe the world is round because God prefers perfect circles, going about crushing dissent from any scientist who tries to prove the world is actually flat. Which it is.
** In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', Lord Vetinari says that 1000 years ago people thought the world was bowl-shaped, and 500 years ago the Omnian globe idea was mainstream.
** The Moon at least, as shown in ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', is a globe shape.
* There's also Creator/TerryPratchett's earlier novel ''Strata'', which has an ([[InvokedTrope artificially constructed]]) flat world with an orbiting sun designed to look like a Ptolemaic world map. [[spoiler: The end reveals that the people there are humans before being evacuated to Earth, and those old maps were simply accurate.]]
* The world of Literature/{{Narnia}} is also flat. The characters reach the edge in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader''. The three children never do see what (if anything) lies beyond Aslan's Country (though it's implied that the dome of the sky comes down to meet the ground there). The Narnians are surprised to find out that the Pevensies come from around world, and are delighted, because that's what ''their'' fantasy stories are about.

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* Creator/TerryPratchett:
**
''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** *** As the name suggests, the series takes place on a very slightly convex disc. It's also supported by four giant elephants on the back of an insanely vast turtle. It has a (spherical) tiny sun and a tiny moon, which travel in complex patterns to make seasons. (Sometimes, one of the elephants has to cock a leg to let them go by.)
** *** ''Discworld/SmallGods'' concerns the bold efforts of the Omnians, religious fanatics who believe the world is round because God prefers perfect circles, going about crushing dissent from any scientist who tries to prove the world is actually flat. Which it is.
** *** In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', Lord Vetinari says that 1000 years ago people thought the world was bowl-shaped, and 500 years ago the Omnian globe idea was mainstream.
** *** The Moon at least, as shown in ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', is a globe shape.
* There's also Creator/TerryPratchett's earlier novel ''Strata'', which ** ''Literature/{{Strata}}'' has an ([[InvokedTrope artificially constructed]]) flat world with an orbiting sun designed to look like a Ptolemaic world map. [[spoiler: The end reveals that the people there are humans before being evacuated to Earth, and those old maps were simply accurate.]]
* The world of Literature/{{Narnia}} is also flat.''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'': Narnia exists in a classical flat world. The characters reach the edge in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader''. The three children never do see what (if anything) lies beyond Aslan's Country (though it's implied that the dome of the sky comes down to meet the ground there). The Narnians are surprised and delighted to find out that the Pevensies come from around a round world, and are delighted, because that's what ''their'' fantasy stories are about.



* In ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', it is revealed that ''Middle-earth'' was originally flat. It was reshaped into a sphere by Eru Ilúvatar to prevent humanity from attempting to sail to Valinor.

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* In ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', it is revealed that ''Middle-earth'' ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'': Arda, the world the books are set in, was originally flat. It was reshaped into a sphere by Eru Ilúvatar to prevent humanity from attempting to sail to Valinor.



** Later Creator/JRRTolkien decided this was bad fantasy -- and stupid because Middle-earth is supposed to be the real world --, but his attempts to write a round-world creation story were consistently less beautiful than the flat-world versions.

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** Later Later, Creator/JRRTolkien decided this was bad fantasy -- and stupid because Middle-earth is supposed to be the real world --, -- but his attempts to write a round-world creation story were consistently less beautiful than the flat-world versions.



* The novels ''Circumpolar!'' and ''Countersolar!'' feature an alternate Solar System in which every planet and moon is a holed disc (but the Sun is still a spheroid). Earth's familiar continents are wrapped around the North Hole, with Antarctica stretched around the rim, and the first novel concerns a pair of rival expeditions to the unknown other side of the world.
* ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'', which is not merely flat but two-dimensional, inhabited by squares, triangles, circles, and the like. There is air and rain but no mention of any actual ground...
* Subverted in ''Sphereland'', a follow-up to ''Flatland'', wherein the narrator discovers that [[spoiler:the world is ''circular'', and that ''space itself'' curves spherically]] by a combination of circumnavigating the world and showing that sufficiently large triangles have interior angles that add up to more than 180 degrees. Naturally, he's disregarded as a heretic.
** In ''Flatterland'' a world is discovered that is a circular disk of finite size and infinite area. In the middle things are "normal" size and as you move toward the edge everything gets smaller, preventing anyone from ever reaching the edge.

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* The novels ''Circumpolar!'' ''Literature/{{Circumpolar}}'' and ''Countersolar!'' ''Literature/{{Countersolar}}'' feature an alternate Solar System in which every planet and moon is a holed disc (but the Sun is still a spheroid). Earth's familiar continents are wrapped around the North Hole, with Antarctica stretched around the rim, and the first novel concerns a pair of rival expeditions to the unknown other side of the world.
* ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'', which ''Literature/{{Flatland}}'':
** The titular Flatland
is not merely flat but two-dimensional, and inhabited by squares, triangles, circles, and the like. There is air and rain but no mention of any actual ground...
* ** Subverted in ''Sphereland'', a follow-up to ''Flatland'', wherein the narrator discovers that [[spoiler:the world is ''circular'', and that ''space itself'' curves spherically]] by a combination of circumnavigating the world and showing that sufficiently large triangles have interior angles that add up to more than 180 degrees. Naturally, he's disregarded as a heretic.
** In ''Flatterland'' ''Flatterland'', a world is discovered that is a circular disk of finite size and infinite area. In the middle things are of "normal" size and and, as you move toward away from the edge center, everything gets smaller, preventing anyone from ever reaching the actual edge.



* ''Pyramid Scheme'', despite its title, features the flat world of Greek mythology -- Europe and northern Africa, girdled by the River Ocean.
* The novella ''Literature/MissileGap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth and possibly also one more planet]] have been flattened and placed on it. All the physics related with the fact how gigantic the megastructure is are played hard, meaning there are no "shortcuts" for travel and ballistics are messed up, while generating escape velocity, or even orbital speed, is impossible with the tech level the humans have.
* The world of ''Literature/TheNeverendingStory'' is apparently flat, and goes on forever in all directions.
* In ''The Deerslayer'' (the prequel to ''Last of the Mohicans''), Hawkeye tries to convince his NobleSavage friends that the world is round, but they don't buy his arguments, since they can see the sun rise and set each day.

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* ''Pyramid Scheme'', despite its title, ''Literature/PyramidScheme'', features the flat world of Greek mythology -- Europe and northern Africa, girdled by the River Ocean.
* The novella ''Literature/MissileGap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth and possibly also one more planet]] have been flattened and placed on it. All the physics related with the fact how gigantic the megastructure is are played hard, meaning there are no "shortcuts" for travel and ballistics are messed up, while generating escape velocity, or even orbital speed, is impossible with the tech level the humans have.
* The world of ''Literature/TheNeverendingStory'' ''Literature/TheNeverendingStory'': Fantastica is apparently flat, and goes on forever in all directions.
* In ''The Deerslayer'' ''Literature/TheDeerslayer'' (the prequel to ''Last of the Mohicans''), ''Literature/LastOfTheMohicans''), Hawkeye tries to convince his NobleSavage friends that the world is round, but they don't buy his arguments, since they can see the sun rise and set each day.



** His AlternateHistory short story "[[spoiler: Sail On! Sail On!]]" turns out to be the grimly amusing story of how [[spoiler: Christopher Columbus discovered that the world is flat.]]

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** His AlternateHistory short story "[[spoiler: Sail On! Sail On!]]" turns out to be the grimly amusing story of how [[spoiler: Christopher Columbus Columbus]] discovered that the world is flat.]]



** Technically, the landscape of the ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is a Flatworld, as it only has one side and has edges walled off with hundred-thousand-mile high walls. Its diameter is so great that any local deviation from a flat plane is negligible.

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** Technically, the landscape of the ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is a Flatworld, flat world, as it only has one side and has edges walled off with hundred-thousand-mile high walls. Its diameter is so great that any local deviation from a flat plane is negligible.



* The poem "The Edge of the World", by Creator/ShelSilverstein. The illustration on the cover of the book ''Where The Sidewalk Ends'' uses the illustration from the poem "The Edge of the World", [[CoversAlwaysLie leading some to mistakenly assume that the illustration is for the specific poem "Where the Sidewalk Ends"]] (which is actually about the grassy strip between the sidewalk and the street).

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* The poem "The Edge of the World", by Creator/ShelSilverstein. The illustration on the cover of the book ''Where The the Sidewalk Ends'' uses the illustration from the poem "The Edge of the World", [[CoversAlwaysLie leading some to mistakenly assume that the illustration is for the specific poem "Where the Sidewalk Ends"]] (which is actually about the grassy strip between the sidewalk and the street).



* Pretty much the whole premise of ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''. [[spoiler: Until the end, that is.]]

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* Pretty much ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles'' is set on a large, flat-topped cliff jutting out into an infinite sky from... somewhere. Its plane, triangular surface is all the whole premise of ''Literature/TheEdgeChronicles''. [[spoiler: Until the end, that is.]]world its inhabitants know.



* ''The Emperor's Coloured Coat'' by John Biggins. Otto Prohaska is dumbfounded to find that the sea captain of the vessel he's sailing on thinks this due to his religious beliefs. Even more amazing is how he's able to accurately navigate his ship regardless.

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* ''The Emperor's Coloured Coat'' by John Biggins. ''Literature/TheEmperorsColouredCoat'': Otto Prohaska is dumbfounded to find that the sea captain of the vessel he's sailing on thinks this due to his religious beliefs. Even more amazing is how he's able to accurately navigate his ship regardless.
regardless.


* ''Literature/OracleOfTao'' has not one but two flat Earth models. Due to constant edits from being a self-published work, the first (which later turns out to be an illusory world) changed from "burrito shaped" world to being described as a mobius to a latest version where it is shaped like a waffle iron with two hemispheres separated by the thin strip of land and water. It is even possible to fall off or dig through the world! The second version has a much more "realistic" flat Earth model that essentially makes it like a globe, only the upper side is flat except for a domed atmosphere.

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* ''Literature/OracleOfTao'' has not one but two flat Earth models. Due to constant edits from being a self-published work, the first (which later turns out to be an illusory world) changed from "burrito shaped" world to being described as a mobius to a latest version where it is shaped like a waffle iron with two hemispheres separated by the thin strip of land and water. It is even possible to fall off or dig through the world! The second version has a much more "realistic" flat Earth model that essentially makes it like a globe, only the upper side is flat except for a domed atmosphere. atmosphere, and which you cannot fall off of due to curved space.

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* ''Literature/OracleOfTao'' has not one but two flat Earth models. Due to constant edits from being a self-published work, the first (which later turns out to be an illusory world) changed from "burrito shaped" world to being described as a mobius to a latest version where it is shaped like a waffle iron with two hemispheres separated by the thin strip of land and water. It is even possible to fall off or dig through the world! The second version has a much more "realistic" flat Earth model that essentially makes it like a globe, only the upper side is flat except for a domed atmosphere.


* The novella ''Literature/MissileGap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth]] have been flattened and placed on it.

to:

* The novella ''Literature/MissileGap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth]] Earth and possibly also one more planet]] have been flattened and placed on it.it. All the physics related with the fact how gigantic the megastructure is are played hard, meaning there are no "shortcuts" for travel and ballistics are messed up, while generating escape velocity, or even orbital speed, is impossible with the tech level the humans have.


* The novella ''Literature/Missile Gap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth]] have been flattened and placed on it.

to:

* The novella ''Literature/Missile Gap'' ''Literature/MissileGap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth]] have been flattened and placed on it.


* The novella ''Missile Gap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on an Alderson disc big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth]] have been flattened and placed on it.

to:

* The novella ''Missile ''Literature/Missile Gap'' by Creator/CharlesStross takes place on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alderson_disk an Alderson disc disk]] big enough that [[spoiler:multiple copies of Earth]] have been flattened and placed on it.


* Some people with sophisticated astronomies, like the Indians, Chines, and Mayas, still believed the Earth to be flat.

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* Some people with sophisticated astronomies, like the Indians, Chines, Chinese, and Mayas, Mayans, still believed the Earth to be flat.flat.
** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aryabhata Aryabhata]], better known as the Indian guy who invented trigonometry, decimal numerals, and algebra before [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Compendious_Book_on_Calculation_by_Completion_and_Balancing al-Jabr]], {{averted| Trope}} this: he not only advocated for a spherical Earth, but also that the Earth [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning rotated]], rather than the common perception that the celestial sphere rotated around the Earth. He even calculated the Earth's diameter to a surprisingly accurate degree.


** While the Earth may or may not be completely flat, [[StrawmanHasAPoint it cannot be completely round either]], and at the very least there are some evidences that its rotation is greatly exaggerated (it cannot be completely round because while the sky is definitely rounded, a perfectly round sphere of land would not be able to retain water). They had someone skydiving from extremely high altitude, and given the Earth's claimed orbit, he should have landed thousands of miles west of where he dropped but instead of the landing spot estimated, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLgfrJBxkPM he actually landed slightly east of where he dropped]].

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** While the Earth may or may not be completely flat, [[StrawmanHasAPoint it cannot be completely round either]], and at the very least there are some evidences that its rotation is greatly exaggerated (it cannot be completely round because while the sky is definitely rounded, a perfectly round sphere of land would not be able to retain water). They had someone skydiving from extremely high altitude, and given the Earth's claimed orbit, he should have landed thousands of miles west of where he dropped but instead of the landing spot estimated, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLgfrJBxkPM he actually landed slightly east of where he dropped]].

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* The eponymous kids in the Dutch show ''WesternAnimation/StarStreetTheAdventuresOfTheStarKids'' live in a star-shaped flat planetoid.


* Creator/LarryNiven's essay "Bigger than Worlds" includes a description of a world shaped like a phonograph record without grooves, hundreds of millions of miles wide, with its sun bobbing up and down through a center hole and a thousand-mile-high wall around the hole to keep the atmosphere in. Local gravity means that down is always toward the surface of the disc. Because the sun never gets overhead, the effect is a world of twilight alternating with night. Niven notes that this world would be ideal for SwordAndSorcery novels, especially should the builder civilization fall -- it's got the right "strange, unfamiliar world" feel, and since areas at different distances from the sun could house aliens from very different worlds, natural spread and adaptation of alien life across the borders would provide for the monsters.

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* ** Creator/LarryNiven's essay "Bigger than Worlds" includes a description of a world shaped like a phonograph record without grooves, hundreds of millions of miles wide, with its sun bobbing up and down through a center hole and a thousand-mile-high wall around the hole to keep the atmosphere in. Local gravity means that down is always toward the surface of the disc. Because the sun never gets overhead, the effect is a world of twilight alternating with night. Niven notes that this world would be ideal for SwordAndSorcery novels, especially should the builder civilization fall -- it's got the right "strange, unfamiliar world" feel, and since areas at different distances from the sun could house aliens from very different worlds, natural spread and adaptation of alien life across the borders would provide for the monsters.


* The animated movie ''WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas'' shows the world to be spheric (at least from goddess Eris' perspective) but in order to enter her realm one should sail till the edge (probably the edge is made by her own magic) which causes one of the sailors (who bet about) to say: "Pay up, it's flat."

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* The animated movie ''WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas'' shows the world to be spheric (at least from goddess Eris' perspective) but in order to enter her realm one should sail till the edge (probably the edge is made by her own magic) which causes one of the sailors (who bet about) about it) to say: "Pay up, it's flat."


* The animated movie ''WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas''. "Pay up, it's flat."

to:

* The animated movie ''WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas''. ''WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas'' shows the world to be spheric (at least from goddess Eris' perspective) but in order to enter her realm one should sail till the edge (probably the edge is made by her own magic) which causes one of the sailors (who bet about) to say: "Pay up, it's flat."



* Technically, the landscape of the ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is a Flatworld, as it only has one side and has edges walled off with hundred-thousand-mile high walls. Its diameter is so great that any local deviation from a flat plane is negligible.
* Ringworld creator Creator/LarryNiven's essay "Bigger than Worlds" includes a description of a world shaped like a phonograph record without grooves, hundreds of millions of miles wide, with its sun bobbing up and down through a center hole and a thousand-mile-high wall around the hole to keep the atmosphere in. Local gravity means that down is always toward the surface of the disc. Because the sun never gets overhead, the effect is a world of twilight alternating with night. Niven notes that this world would be ideal for SwordAndSorcery novels, especially should the builder civilization fall -- it's got the right "strange, unfamiliar world" feel, and since areas at different distances from the sun could house aliens from very different worlds, natural spread and adaptation of alien life across the borders would provide for the monsters.

to:

* Creator/LarryNiven:
**
Technically, the landscape of the ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is a Flatworld, as it only has one side and has edges walled off with hundred-thousand-mile high walls. Its diameter is so great that any local deviation from a flat plane is negligible.
* Ringworld creator Creator/LarryNiven's essay "Bigger than Worlds" includes a description of a world shaped like a phonograph record without grooves, hundreds of millions of miles wide, with its sun bobbing up and down through a center hole and a thousand-mile-high wall around the hole to keep the atmosphere in. Local gravity means that down is always toward the surface of the disc. Because the sun never gets overhead, the effect is a world of twilight alternating with night. Niven notes that this world would be ideal for SwordAndSorcery novels, especially should the builder civilization fall -- it's got the right "strange, unfamiliar world" feel, and since areas at different distances from the sun could house aliens from very different worlds, natural spread and adaptation of alien life across the borders would provide for the monsters.

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