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* Discontinuity/ProWrestling

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* Discontinuity/ProWrestlingDiscontinuity/ProfessionalWrestling


* ''WesternAnimation/BobsBurgers'': Louise's substitute teacher is an avid Thomas Edison fan, and vehemently denies that Edison ever performed any unsavory experiments involving AC electricity and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topsy_%28elephant%29 a circus elephant named Topsy.]]

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* ''WesternAnimation/BobsBurgers'': In "Topsy" Louise's substitute science teacher is an avid Thomas Edison fan, and vehemently denies that Edison ever performed any unsavory experiments involving AC electricity and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topsy_%28elephant%29 a circus elephant named Topsy.elephant.]]


** Another episode shows that the entire town of Springfield has a parent-wide conspiracy regarding FindingNemo. All the parents start the film at the second scene, so the kids don't see the opening where Coral and all the other babies besides Nemo are eaten.

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** Another episode shows that the entire town of Springfield has a parent-wide conspiracy regarding FindingNemo.WesternAnimation/FindingNemo. All the parents start the film at the second scene, so the kids don't see the opening where Coral and all the other babies besides Nemo are eaten.

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** Another episode shows that the entire town of Springfield has a parent-wide conspiracy regarding FindingNemo. All the parents start the film at the second scene, so the kids don't see the opening where Coral and all the other babies besides Nemo are eaten.


''Note: This is highly subjective, more based on the fandom rather than the event itself. The visceral response to fanon discontinuity can baffle other fans who don't take the event as seriously, or even like the event. Just because an event or work has an example on here doesn't mean it's bad or that you're wrong for liking it. And just because a work is heavily disliked by the fanbase, it doesn't mean it should be listed here. This is a neutral catalogue of a phenomenon in fandom, not a list of things we think are bad. That also means that you should only post examples where a significant portion of the fandom disregards an event, not just your own personal bugbears. Also, using this as a {{pothole}} is generally rather rude, so please don't do it unless you want to use CanonDiscontinuity instead.''

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''Note: This is highly subjective, more based on the fandom rather than the event itself. The visceral response to fanon discontinuity can baffle other fans who don't take the event as seriously, or even like the event. Just because an event or work has an example on here doesn't mean it's bad or that you're wrong for liking it. And just because a work is heavily disliked by the fanbase, it doesn't mean it should be listed here.here, because fans can dislike a work but still accept it as canon. This is a neutral catalogue of a phenomenon in fandom, not a list of things we think are bad. That also means that you should only post examples where a significant portion of the fandom disregards an event, not just your own personal bugbears. Also, using this as a {{pothole}} is generally rather rude, so please don't do it unless you want to use CanonDiscontinuity instead.''

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* As seen in the page image, [[https://xkcd.com/566/ this]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' comic has a guy having the crap beaten out of him by his friends for suggesting that there are sequels to ''Film/TheMatrix''.


If the questionable elements are written out of canonicity by the [[WordOfGod creators themselves]], then said elements entered in CanonDiscontinuity territory, or, in less severe cases, are given a DiscontinuityNod. It gets ironic when a different twist of this trope happens when the work is officially removed from continuity, but fans still like it and treat as canonical. If the creator just bashes it, then it's CreatorBacklash. If, on the other hand, the controversial element is somehow reworked into being tolerable or even popular, it's been RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap. See also TheyChangedItNowItSucks and LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain.

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If the questionable elements are written out of canonicity by the [[WordOfGod creators themselves]], then said elements entered in CanonDiscontinuity territory, or, in less severe cases, are given a DiscontinuityNod. It gets ironic when a different twist semi-inversion of this trope happens when the work is officially removed from continuity, but fans still like it and treat as canonical. If the creator just bashes it, then it's CreatorBacklash. If, on the other hand, the controversial element is somehow reworked into being tolerable or even popular, it's been RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap. See also TheyChangedItNowItSucks and LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain.


If the questionable elements are written out of canonicity by the [[WordOfGod creators themselves]], then said elements entered in CanonDiscontinuity territory, or, in less severe cases, are given a DiscontinuityNod. If the creator just bashes it, then it's CreatorBacklash. If, on the other hand, the controversial element is somehow reworked into being tolerable or even popular, it's been RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap. See also TheyChangedItNowItSucks and LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain.

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If the questionable elements are written out of canonicity by the [[WordOfGod creators themselves]], then said elements entered in CanonDiscontinuity territory, or, in less severe cases, are given a DiscontinuityNod. It gets ironic when a different twist of this trope happens when the work is officially removed from continuity, but fans still like it and treat as canonical. If the creator just bashes it, then it's CreatorBacklash. If, on the other hand, the controversial element is somehow reworked into being tolerable or even popular, it's been RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap. See also TheyChangedItNowItSucks and LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain.


''Note: This is highly subjective, more based on the fandom rather than the event itself. The visceral response to fanon discontinuity can baffle other fans who don't take the event as seriously, or even like the event. Just because an event or work has an example on here doesn't mean it's bad or that you're wrong for liking it. This is a neutral catalogue of a phenomenon in fandom, not a list of things we think are bad. That also means that you should only post examples where a significant portion of the fandom disregards an event, not just your own personal bugbears. Also, using this as a {{pothole}} is generally rather rude, so please don't do it unless you want to use CanonDiscontinuity instead.''

to:

''Note: This is highly subjective, more based on the fandom rather than the event itself. The visceral response to fanon discontinuity can baffle other fans who don't take the event as seriously, or even like the event. Just because an event or work has an example on here doesn't mean it's bad or that you're wrong for liking it. And just because a work is heavily disliked by the fanbase, it doesn't mean it should be listed here. This is a neutral catalogue of a phenomenon in fandom, not a list of things we think are bad. That also means that you should only post examples where a significant portion of the fandom disregards an event, not just your own personal bugbears. Also, using this as a {{pothole}} is generally rather rude, so please don't do it unless you want to use CanonDiscontinuity instead.''


** In another episode, Homer has been reading to Lisa at night from what is obviously HarryPotter with the SerialNumbersFiledOff. He's hesitant to read her the ending because it's sad (a reference to [[spoiler:Dumbledore's death in book six]]), so instead he invents a happier ending to tell her. [[spoiler:Later Lisa pulls out a second copy of the book and reads the true ending for herself, then decides that "Dad's ending was better."]]

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** In another episode, Homer has been reading to Lisa at night from what is obviously HarryPotter Literature/HarryPotter with the SerialNumbersFiledOff. He's hesitant to read her the ending because it's sad (a reference to [[spoiler:Dumbledore's death in book six]]), so instead he invents a happier ending to tell her. [[spoiler:Later Lisa pulls out a second copy of the book and reads the true ending for herself, then decides that "Dad's ending was better."]]


In moviedom, {{Sequelitis}} is the most common cause of Fanon Discontinuity. It's very common to hear fans of a popular movie series disavow all sequels beyond a certain point, typically the first or second movie. For example, the unofficial slogan of the ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'' fandom is, "There Should Have Been Only One" (a play on the franchise's famous quote of "ThereCanBeOnlyOne," in case you're wondering). It is often supported and justified by the fact that the creators of the original had nothing to do with the sequels, so it is essentially not their work.

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In moviedom, {{Sequelitis}} is the most common cause of Fanon Discontinuity. It's very common to hear fans of a popular movie series disavow all sequels beyond a certain point, typically the first or second movie. For example, the unofficial slogan of the ''Franchise/{{Highlander}}'' fandom is, "There Should Have Been Only One" (a One".[[note]]a play on the franchise's famous quote of "ThereCanBeOnlyOne," in case you're wondering). wondering.[[/note]] It is often supported and justified by the fact that [[GodDoesNotOwnThisWorld the creators of the original had nothing to do with the sequels, sequels]], so it is essentially not their work.work.



If the questionable elements are written out of canonicity by the [[WordOfGod creators themselves]], then said elements entered in CanonDiscontinuity territory, or, luckily, are given a DiscontinuityNod. If the creator just bashes it, then it's CreatorBacklash. If, on the other hand, the controversial element is somehow reworked into being tolerable or even popular, it's been RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap. See also TheyChangedItNowItSucks and LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain.

to:

If the questionable elements are written out of canonicity by the [[WordOfGod creators themselves]], then said elements entered in CanonDiscontinuity territory, or, luckily, in less severe cases, are given a DiscontinuityNod. If the creator just bashes it, then it's CreatorBacklash. If, on the other hand, the controversial element is somehow reworked into being tolerable or even popular, it's been RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap. See also TheyChangedItNowItSucks and LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain.


''Note: This is highly subjective, more based on the fandom rather than the event itself. The visceral response to fanon discontinuity can baffle other fans who don't take the event as seriously, or even like the event. Please only post examples of the fandom as a whole disregarding an event. Also, using this as a {{pothole}} is generally rather rude, so please don't do it unless you want to use CanonDiscontinuity instead.''

to:

''Note: This is highly subjective, more based on the fandom rather than the event itself. The visceral response to fanon discontinuity can baffle other fans who don't take the event as seriously, or even like the event. Please Just because an event or work has an example on here doesn't mean it's bad or that you're wrong for liking it. This is a neutral catalogue of a phenomenon in fandom, not a list of things we think are bad. That also means that you should only post examples where a significant portion of the fandom as a whole disregarding disregards an event.event, not just your own personal bugbears. Also, using this as a {{pothole}} is generally rather rude, so please don't do it unless you want to use CanonDiscontinuity instead.''


-->- [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E14StrangerThanFanFiction "Stranger than Fanfiction,"]] from ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic.''


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-->- -->-- [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E14StrangerThanFanFiction "Stranger than Fanfiction,"]] from ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic.''

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