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* ''TabletopeGame/{{Warhammer}}'': The Tomb Kings are undead, and therefore cannot normally make marches (double-speed movements), but one of their magic spells allows them to have a second movement phase.

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* ''TabletopeGame/{{Warhammer}}'': ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'': The Tomb Kings are undead, and therefore cannot normally make marches (double-speed movements), but one of their magic spells allows them to have a second movement phase.


* In ''TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}'', losing your turn is the penalty for challenging a play that turns out to have been a legal word. Obviously, this is an extra turn for your opponent if there's only one, meaning that making people unwilling to challenge your phony word is [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught a perfectly viable strategy]], although some tournaments change the penalty to loss of points, or do away with it.

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* In ''TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}'', losing your turn is the penalty for challenging a play that turns out to have been a legal word. Obviously, this is an extra turn for your opponent if there's only one, meaning that making people unwilling to challenge your phony word ( or [[RefugeInAudacity making real words seem fake]] by mispronouncing or misdefining them) is [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught a perfectly viable strategy]], although some tournaments change the penalty to loss of points, or do away with it.


* At least one game of Mornington Crescent on ''Radio/ImSorryIHaventAClue'' was played with an optional rule that meant a player could lose their next two turns ("in nid"). Since new Mornington Crescent rules are always tested to destruction and beyond, this inevitably lead to ''everyone'' being in nid, with Willie Rushton counting off the missed turns as they went round the panel.

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* ''Radio/ImSorryIHaventAClue'':
**
At least one game of Mornington Crescent on ''Radio/ImSorryIHaventAClue'' was played with an optional rule that meant a player could lose their next two turns ("in nid"). Since new Mornington Crescent rules are always tested to destruction and beyond, this inevitably lead to ''everyone'' being in nid, with Willie Rushton counting off the missed turns as they went round the panel.panel.
** Another round, in which they played the board game ''Boardo'', had a Chance card that read "You are [[PottyEmergency caught short]] at the London Palladium. [[IncrediblyLamePun Miss a turn]]".

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[[folder: Radio]]
* At least one game of Mornington Crescent on ''Radio/ImSorryIHaventAClue'' was played with an optional rule that meant a player could lose their next two turns ("in nid"). Since new Mornington Crescent rules are always tested to destruction and beyond, this inevitably lead to ''everyone'' being in nid, with Willie Rushton counting off the missed turns as they went round the panel.
[[/folder]]

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* In ''VideoGame/OctopathTraveler'', the Hunter job has the Support Skill "Patience," which grants a 25% chance of an extra turn after everyone else has gone, but before the next round begins. Later game bosses not only can act two or three times per round, but a few can grant themselves extra turns with certain abilities.


* Rolling doubles in ''{{TabletopGame/MONOPOLY}}'' grants the player another turn. However, rolling doubles three times in a row sends you straight to jail.
* Basically most simple children's race games (where you roll a die and move your pieces along the track until you reach the finish) include this as a reward for landing on certain squares (while other squares penalize an unlucky player by forcing them to skip their turn).

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* Rolling doubles in ''{{TabletopGame/MONOPOLY}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Monopoly}}'' grants the player another turn. However, rolling doubles three times in a row sends you straight to jail.
* Basically most simple children's race games (where you roll a die and move your pieces along the track until you reach the finish) include this as a reward for landing on certain squares (while other squares may penalize an unlucky player by forcing them to skip their turn).


* In TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}, losing your turn is the penalty for challenging a play that turns out to have been a legal word. Obviously, this is an extra turn for your opponent if there's only one, meaning that making people unwilling to challenge your phony word is [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught a perfectly viable strategy]], although some tournaments change the penalty to loss of points, or do away with it.
* The Waterdeep Harbor spaces in "Lords of Waterdeep" act as this, since at the end of the round any agents that are there must be reassigned to empty spaces on the board. Thus a savvy player will be able to gain multiple turns by stockpiling agents at the Harbor, using Intrigue cards to gain resources, followed by then gaining a new resource when reassigning. This is very important long term as you can only complete one quest per turn, so multiple turns means more opportunities to complete quests.

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* In TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}, ''TabletopGame/{{Scrabble}}'', losing your turn is the penalty for challenging a play that turns out to have been a legal word. Obviously, this is an extra turn for your opponent if there's only one, meaning that making people unwilling to challenge your phony word is [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught a perfectly viable strategy]], although some tournaments change the penalty to loss of points, or do away with it.
* ''Lords of Waterdeep'':
**
The Waterdeep Harbor spaces in "Lords of Waterdeep" act as this, since at the end of the round any agents that are there must be reassigned to empty spaces on the board. Thus a savvy player will be able to gain multiple turns by stockpiling agents at the Harbor, using Intrigue cards to gain resources, followed by then gaining a new resource when reassigning. This is very important long term as you can only complete one quest per turn, so multiple turns means more opportunities to complete quests.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Carcassonne}}'': The "Builder" piece from the "Traders and Builders" expansion gives the owner another turn after playing a tile that extends the city or road occupied by the Builder. (However, the owner cannot get a third turn by immediately extending the city or road again.)
* In ''TabletopGame/TheOthers'' All characters have 2 turns per round, but there are ways to obtain extra turns through character abilities or city actions, although once an extra turn token is spent, a new one must be obtained.
* ''TabletopGame/ArkhamHorror'' 3[[superscript:rd]] Edition:
** The Pocket Watch grants its owner an extra action on their turn -- a powerful advantage, since players are normally limited to two actions per turn, and moving counts as one of them.
** Marie Lambeau's special ability as a PlayerCharacter is to allow another PC to duplicate one of the actions she takes in a turn.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Carcassonne}}'': The "Builder" piece from the "Traders and Builders" expansion gives the owner another turn after playing a tile that extends the city or road occupied by the Builder. (However, the owner cannot get a third turn by immediately extending the city or road again.)
* In ''TabletopGame/TheOthers'' All characters have 2 turns per round, but there are ways to obtain extra turns through character abilities or city actions, although once an extra turn token is spent, a new one must be obtained.
* ''TabletopGame/ArkhamHorror'' 3[[superscript:rd]] Edition:
** The Pocket Watch grants its owner an extra action on their turn -- a powerful advantage, since players are normally limited to two actions per turn, and moving counts as one of them.
** Marie Lambeau's special ability as a PlayerCharacter is to allow another PC to duplicate one of the actions she takes in a turn.

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* ''TabletopGame/ArkhamHorror'' 3[[superscript:rd]] Edition:
** The Pocket Watch grants its owner an extra action on their turn -- a powerful advantage, since players are normally limited to two actions per turn, and moving counts as one of them.
** Marie Lambeau's special ability as a PlayerCharacter is to allow another PC to duplicate one of the actions she takes in a turn.


** Unfortunately, it was replaced for a while with "[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure ZA WAARUDO Lockdown]]", a deck based on exploiting one of the coin-flip effects of the card Arcana Force XXI: The World, an effect that lets you skip the opponent's ''entire'' turn at once, but at a cost of two of your monsters.

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** Unfortunately, it was replaced for a while with "[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure ZA WAARUDO Lockdown]]", a deck based on exploiting one of the coin-flip effects of the card [[https://yugipedia.com/wiki/Arcana_Force_XXI_-_The_World Arcana Force XXI: The World, World]], an effect that lets you skip the opponent's ''entire'' turn at once, but at a cost of two of your monsters.monsters.
*** Luckily, people have found a way around the cost, by using [[https://yugipedia.com/wiki/Treeborn_Frog Treeborn Frog]] and [[https://yugipedia.com/wiki/Samsara_Lotus Samsara Lotus]], though the latter require you to have no spell or trap cards on the field.


* Since the Pokemon series focuses mainly on one-on-one combat, many of the game's status ailments can be viewed as extra turns to whomever inflicts them. E.g., when a Pokemon paralyzes its foe, there is a 25% chance that the victim will lose their turn to paralysis. If a Pokemon gets "flinched" before it makes its move, it loses its turn. If a foe is asleep, they lose two to five consecutive turns in a row (unless they also have Snore or Sleep Talk, which can be used while sleeping). If the victim is frozen, there's an 80% chance they'll lose their turn (so, theoretically, it could last forever, but in practice they usually thaw out 2-3 turns later). Note that in these cases only the ''Pokemon'' loses its turn; its ''Trainer'' is still free to take actions (such as healing the Pokemon or swapping it out for another).

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* Since the Pokemon Franchise/{{Pokemon}} series focuses mainly on one-on-one combat, many of the game's status ailments can be viewed as extra turns to whomever inflicts them. E.g., when a Pokemon paralyzes its foe, there is a 25% chance that the victim will lose their turn to paralysis. If a Pokemon gets "flinched" before it makes its move, it loses its turn. If a foe is asleep, they lose two to five consecutive turns in a row (unless they also have Snore or Sleep Talk, which can be used while sleeping). If the victim is frozen, there's an 80% chance they'll lose their turn (so, theoretically, it could last forever, but in practice they usually thaw out 2-3 turns later). Note that in these cases only the ''Pokemon'' loses its turn; its ''Trainer'' is still free to take actions (such as healing the Pokemon or swapping it out for another).


* The online CCG ''[[VideoGame/MightAndMagic Might and Magic: Duel of Champions]]'' has 2 cards that can grant you an extra turn. First is Time Jump, an extremely expensive spell with a maximum magic requirement (6, the highest of any card seen yet)) which has the added drawback on preventing your resources for renewing at the start of your bonus turn, severely limiting the amount you have to spend on both turns. Despite this, it is still considered a GameBreaker by some because of the game's combat system, where defenders don't get to choose how to block attacking creatures. The 2nd is Timebender Djinn, a beefy Academy creature that will automatically discard itself to grant you an extra turn for free if you start your turn with 4 other Prime-element creatures on the board at once. While it lacks the drawback (or cost) of Time Jump, its effect is so hard to trigger (if you can get 5 creatures to live through your opponent's turn then you're probably going to win anyway) that it's generally considered AwesomeButImpractical.

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* The online CCG ''[[VideoGame/MightAndMagic Might and Magic: Duel of Champions]]'' has 2 cards that can grant you an extra turn. First is Time Jump, an extremely expensive spell with a maximum magic requirement (6, the highest of any card seen yet)) yet) which has the added drawback on preventing your resources for renewing at the start of your bonus turn, severely limiting the amount you have to spend on both turns. Despite this, it is still considered a GameBreaker by some because of the game's combat system, where defenders don't get to choose how to block attacking creatures. The 2nd is Timebender Djinn, a beefy Academy creature that will automatically discard itself to grant you an extra turn for free if you start your turn with 4 other Prime-element creatures on the board at once. While it lacks the drawback (or cost) of Time Jump, its effect is so hard to trigger (if you can get 5 creatures to live through your opponent's turn then you're probably going to win anyway) that it's generally considered AwesomeButImpractical.

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* In ''TabletopGame/TheOthers'' All characters have 2 turns per round, but there are ways to obtain extra turns through character abilities or city actions, although once an extra turn token is spent, a new one must be obtained.


* The Intrude skill in the ''{{Wild ARMs}}'' series. It was practically a GameBreaker when it was first introduced in ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 4}}'', since the MightyGlacier who can use it possessed obscene levels of damage and could spam it as long as there is at least one level in [[ChargeMeter Force Gauge]], so even boss battles tend to end once she gets her turn.

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* The Intrude skill in the ''{{Wild ARMs}}'' ''VideoGame/WildArms'' series. It was practically a GameBreaker when it was first introduced in ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs 4}}'', ''VideoGame/WildArms4'', since the MightyGlacier who can use it possessed obscene levels of damage and could spam it as long as there is at least one level in [[ChargeMeter Force Gauge]], so even boss battles tend to end once she gets her turn.

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* The Waterdeep Harbor spaces in "Lords of Waterdeep" act as this, since at the end of the round any agents that are there must be reassigned to empty spaces on the board. Thus a savvy player will be able to gain multiple turns by stockpiling agents at the Harbor, using Intrigue cards to gain resources, followed by then gaining a new resource when reassigning. This is very important long term as you can only complete one quest per turn, so multiple turns means more opportunities to complete quests.
** Two quests allow you to return assigned agents back to the Agent Pool, thus enabling you to get more turns. An Intrigue card allows you to return an assigned agent to the pool for free, while another lets you return a harbor agent to the pool to immediately play two agents in one turn. Finally, the "Manipulate" Intrigue allows you to move an opponents agent to a new space, granting ''them'' an extra turn, minus the quest completion, before you assign a new agent.


Except in the [[IcewindDale Infinity]] [[VideoGame/BaldursGate Engine]] games, where there's no such limit. Combined with [[GameBreaker Improved Alacrity]] this allows a Mage to [[MoreDakka spam their entire spellbook]] in less than a second of 'real time'. The Infinity Engine is based on 2nd Edition D&D, while the rule change that Time Stop won't allow attacks was added as late as 3.5th Edition.

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Except in the [[IcewindDale [[VideoGame/IcewindDale Infinity]] [[VideoGame/BaldursGate Engine]] games, where there's no such limit. Combined with [[GameBreaker Improved Alacrity]] this allows a Mage to [[MoreDakka spam their entire spellbook]] in less than a second of 'real time'. The Infinity Engine is based on 2nd Edition D&D, while the rule change that Time Stop won't allow attacks was added as late as 3.5th Edition.

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