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* FormulaWithATwist: An entry into a genre which follows the same basic formula, with some new twist on the concept.


* AssPull

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* AssPullAssPull: An explanation or solution that comes out of nowhere and completely disregards what the story has already established, named from the idea that the author just pulled an answer from their ass out of desperation for a quick and easy way to resolve the conflict.


* CelebrityParadox

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* CelebrityParadoxCelebrityParadox: Presumably, a movie's actors and other works they starred in don't exist in the setting of the movie.



* BallIndex
* BellisariosMaxim

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* BallIndex
BallIndex: When a character briefly acts inconsistently (referred to in these tropes as "holding the [trait] ball") for the sake of the plot.
* BellisariosMaximBellisariosMaxim: "Don't examine this too closely." Paying too much attention to the inconsistencies can be to a work's detriment.



* TheChrisCarterEffect

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* TheChrisCarterEffectTheChrisCarterEffect: If too many inconsistencies build up, the audience could leave.



* FridgeLogic

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* FridgeLogicFridgeLogic: Inconsistencies the audience only realizes after the fact (as in when they're going to the fridge for a snack).



* {{Handwave}}

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* {{Handwave}}{{Handwave}}: A work gives a token acknowledgement and dismissal of an inconsistency.



* TimeyWimeyBall

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* TimeyWimeyBallTimeyWimeyBall: Very often, TimeTravel is just plain not consistent.


* BallIndex



* VoodooShark: A attempt at fixing a PlotHole that only results in making an even bigger Plot Hole.

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* VoodooShark: A An attempt at fixing a PlotHole that only results in making an even bigger Plot Hole.


* MoralDissonance: A character doesn't see an action as bad unless it happens to them.

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* MoralDissonance: A character doesn't see an An action as is okay if the good guys do it, but unacceptable if the bad unless it happens to them.guys do it.


* DeliberateValuesDissonance: A work set in the past deliberately shows the less unpleasant beliefs and aspects of the past and doesn't whitewash any of it.

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* DeliberateValuesDissonance: A work set in the past deliberately shows the less unpleasant beliefs and aspects of the past and doesn't whitewash any of it.


* {{Deconstruction}}
* DeliberateValuesDissonance

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* {{Deconstruction}}
{{Deconstruction}}: A work looks at the serious reactions and consequences to a work's conventions that are usually glossed over.
* DeliberateValuesDissonanceDeliberateValuesDissonance: A work set in the past deliberately shows the less unpleasant beliefs and aspects of the past and doesn't whitewash any of it.



* RealityEnsues
* ShownTheirWork

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* RealityEnsues
RealityEnsues: The realistic consequences and outcomes of certain tropes are demonstrated rather than having the same results as in any other work of fiction.
* ShownTheirWorkShownTheirWork: It is apparent that whatever subject is referenced or used in the work, the creators did thorough research to ensure they made no mistakes about the subject.



* CriticalResearchFailure
* DanBrowned

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* CriticalResearchFailure
CriticalResearchFailure: It is obvious that the creators did not do their research properly because the information the work gives is blatantly wrong.
* DanBrownedDanBrowned: Insisting you've done the research when it's obvious you didn't.



* PoliticallyCorrectHistory

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* PoliticallyCorrectHistoryPoliticallyCorrectHistory: Works taking place in the past change or remove aspects of the past that today's people would find offensive or politically incorrect.



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece

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* UnintentionalPeriodPieceUnintentionalPeriodPiece: A work references fads, pop culture and other stuff from the time it was made, causing the work not to age well.



* AllMythsAreTrue
* ExpandedUniverse

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* AllMythsAreTrue
AllMythsAreTrue: It is established that all the well-known myths and legends actually happened and weren't just stories.
* ExpandedUniverseExpandedUniverse: Information not given in the work itself is revealed in related tie-in media.



* VileVillainSaccharineShow

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* VileVillainSaccharineShowVileVillainSaccharineShow: A saccharine and lighthearted show has an incongruously sinister villain.



* StrictlyFormula

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* StrictlyFormulaStrictlyFormula: Every episode basically has the same plot.



* ContinuityNod

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* ContinuityNodContinuityNod: Referencing the events of a previous episode or installment.



* DevelopersForesight

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* DevelopersForesightDevelopersForesight: Video game developers are able to anticipate anything the player might try to do in the game.



* AbandonedCatchphrase
* AnimationBump

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* AbandonedCatchphrase
AbandonedCatchphrase: A phrase a character frequently said initially, but later stops saying or doesn't say as often anymore.
* AnimationBumpAnimationBump: Moments in an animated work where the animation is of a higher quality.



* BroadStrokes

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* BroadStrokesBroadStrokes: A sequel or reboot establishes that the events of older stories happened, but not necessarily in the exact same way as depicted in the original stories.



* DependingOnTheArtist
* DependingOnTheWriter
* DiscontinuityNod

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* DependingOnTheArtist
DependingOnTheArtist: A character's physical appearance changes depending on which artist is drawing them.
* DependingOnTheWriter
DependingOnTheWriter: A character's personality, interests and so on change depending on who is writing the current episode.
* DiscontinuityNodDiscontinuityNod: Characters make a disparaging reference to a reviled part of the franchise.



* GameplayAndStorySegregation

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* GameplayAndStorySegregationGameplayAndStorySegregation: What is established in the game's story is not consistent with what is possible or apparent in the actual gameplay.



* InNameOnly
* MoralDissonance
* NegativeContinuity
* OffModel
* OutOfCharacterMoment
* PlotHole
* {{Retcon}}

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* InNameOnly
InNameOnly: An adaptation that is so different from the source material that the title is pretty much the only thing the two works have in common.
* MoralDissonance
MoralDissonance: A character doesn't see an action as bad unless it happens to them.
* NegativeContinuity
NegativeContinuity: A work lacks a consistent canon, so essentially every episode contradicts each other.
* OffModel
OffModel: A character has an inconsistency in their character design.
* OutOfCharacterMoment
OutOfCharacterMoment: A moment where a character's behavior contrasts strongly with how they usually act.
* PlotHole
PlotHole: A story has an inconsistency with the plot preventing it from making complete sense.
* {{Retcon}}{{Retcon}}: Making retroactive changes to the established continuity.



* AWizardDidIt
* VoodooShark

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* AWizardDidIt
AWizardDidIt: Hastily explaining inconsistencies as happening because of magic.
* VoodooSharkVoodooShark: A attempt at fixing a PlotHole that only results in making an even bigger Plot Hole.



* ContinuityLockout

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* ContinuityLockoutContinuityLockout: If you aren't caught up on everything, you won't know what's going on in the current episode or installment.


* Retcon

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* Retcon{{Retcon}}


* CriticalResearchFailure






* CharacterRerailment: Consistent with original characterization at the expense of later characterization.



[[folder:Lack of InternalConsistency]]

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[[folder:Lack of InternalConsistency]]Internal Consistency]]



* CharacterRerailment: Inconsistent with later characterization in favor of original characterization.



* MoralDissonance



* RetCon

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* RetConRetcon


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* ShockingSwerve

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* InconsistentDub

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* SlidingScaleOfGameplayAndStoryIntegration: The higher a game is on this scale, the more internally consistent it is.

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* AscendedGlitch

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* InconsistentColoring


Consistency aids WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, while violations of consistency may be jolting and unexpected, which can benefit both humor and drama. The viewer would be quite surprised to learn that in your universe, Hitler was a circus performer, [[VideoGame/{{Loom}} dragons are scared of fire]], and that the married couple no longer recognize each other in Act III. Generally, if a work is inconsistent, the viewer expects there to be a good reason for it. On the other hand, sometimes violations of consistency go unnoticed even if they're quite obvious, or may even be ''expected''; e.g. TheCoconutEffect violates External Consistency.

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Consistency aids WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, while violations of consistency may be jolting and unexpected, which can benefit both humor and drama. The viewer would be quite surprised to learn that in your universe, [[RichardNixonTheUsedCarSalesman Hitler was a circus performer, performer]], [[VideoGame/{{Loom}} dragons are scared of fire]], and that the married couple no longer recognize each other in Act III. Generally, if a work is inconsistent, the viewer expects there to be a good reason for it. On the other hand, sometimes violations of consistency go unnoticed even if they're quite obvious, or may even be ''expected''; e.g. TheCoconutEffect violates External Consistency.

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