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** In the same film, Arthur's power and status as a king is limited by the film's miniscule budget; he travels with a small retinue, we only see his castle in a brief musical number, he only calls upon his army at the very end of the film, and so on. This is written into the film's plot itself, as it's made abundantly clear that few people really respect Arthur's claim as king and they mostly just see him as a bossy weirdo with nice clothing.

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** In the same film, Arthur's power and status as a king is limited by the film's miniscule minuscule budget; he travels with a small retinue, we only see his castle in a brief musical number, he only calls upon his army at the very end of the film, and so on. This is written into the film's plot itself, as it's made abundantly clear that few people really respect Arthur's claim as king and they mostly just see him as a bossy weirdo with nice clothing.



** Given an InUniverse justification: Kaamelott's enchanter Merlin is an IneptMage extraordinaire, so every time he uses his powers, it's as underwhelming as the special effects can make it. The show isn't entirely run on Coconut Effects- Excalibur always glows when held by someone with an exceptional destiny-, but is so sparingly used as to be forgivable.

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** Given an InUniverse justification: Kaamelott's enchanter Merlin is an IneptMage extraordinaire, so every time he uses his powers, it's as underwhelming as the special effects can make it. The show isn't entirely run on Coconut Effects- Effects -- Excalibur always glows when held by someone with an exceptional destiny-, destiny -- but is they are so sparingly used as to be forgivable.



** In the first episode, Merlin can use his magic to slow down time fairly easily. Since then, however, he's only been shown to do it once. This is presumably because it is hard to film. (It's also illegal in-universe. Hard to film, yes, but it's not going to happen a whole lot anyway.)

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** In the first episode, Merlin can use his magic to slow down time fairly easily. Since then, however, he's only been shown to do it once. This is presumably because it is hard to film. (It's also illegal in-universe. Hard to film, yes, but in-universe, so it's not going to happen a whole lot anyway.)



* ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' thrives on this trope. Of the five main characters, four of them have abilities that require practically no effects (time-rewinding and telepathy only need a rewound camera shot and tiny voiceover, respectively; sex pheromones and immortality need even less effort) and the fifth (invisibility) only needs a brief effect to show it happening, which usually occurs off-screen. Other powers featured so far include mind control, really fast-acting alopecia, de-aging, uncontrollable rage and becoming a dog (who still looks human), none of which require any effects whatsoever.

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* ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' thrives on this trope. Of the five main characters, four of them have abilities that require practically no effects (time-rewinding and telepathy only need a rewound camera shot and tiny a voiceover, respectively; sex pheromones and immortality need even less effort) and the fifth (invisibility) only needs a brief effect to show it happening, which usually occurs off-screen. Other powers featured so far include mind control, really fast-acting alopecia, de-aging, uncontrollable rage and becoming a dog (who still looks human), none of which require any effects whatsoever.



* In ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', one question even the show's youngest fans frequently asked during Megazord battles is why the rangers didn't disassemble the Megazord and fight individually more often (this was especially prevalent when they were fighting multiple monsters at once or an individual Zord had a useful ability the Megazord itself didn't, such as the ability to fly.) The obvious reason is that it's easier to film with a guy in a foam rubber suit than to design and work with multiple props for each individual Zord (some seasons only showed individual zords through a few repeated scenes of StockFootage.) It's telling that, on the odd occasion where the Zords had individual humanoid forms (such as the Shogunzords, Super Zeo Zords, or the [=RescueZords=]), we saw the rangers fighting individually a ''lot'' more.

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* In ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', one question even the show's youngest fans frequently asked during Megazord battles is why the rangers didn't disassemble the Megazord and fight individually more often (this was especially prevalent when they were fighting multiple monsters at once or an individual Zord had a useful ability that the Megazord itself didn't, such as the ability to fly.) The obvious reason is that it's easier to film with a guy in a foam rubber suit than to design and work with multiple props for each individual Zord (some seasons only showed individual zords through a few repeated scenes of StockFootage.) It's telling that, on the odd occasion where the Zords had individual humanoid forms (such as the Shogunzords, Super Zeo Zords, or the [=RescueZords=]), we saw the rangers fighting individually a ''lot'' more.



* ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' somehow manages to have the worst of both worlds. Despite centering around a trio of Wizards in training, who you'd think would be using magic as often as possible to practice, they generally only use a couple of effects per episode, and those effects due to budget constraints look very very cheap.

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* ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' somehow manages to have the worst of both worlds. Despite centering around a trio of Wizards wizards in training, who you'd think would be using magic as often as possible to practice, they generally only use a couple of effects per episode, and those effects due to budget constraints look very very cheap.



** In the films, the conjoined Voldemort/Quirrel was portrayed using CGI. In this show, it's portrayed by... the two actors standing back-to-back beneath a gigantic robe.

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** In the films, the conjoined Voldemort/Quirrel Voldemort/Quirrell was portrayed using CGI. In this show, it's portrayed by... the two actors standing back-to-back beneath a gigantic robe.


** ''Wrath of Khan'' does a good job of integrating into the plot why Khan spends most of the movie in a stolen Starfleet ship, but it certainly didn't hurt that it meant they could reuse the already-built ''Enterprise'' bridge set.

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** ''Wrath of Khan'' does a good job of integrating into the plot why Khan spends most of the movie in a stolen Starfleet ship, but it certainly didn't hurt that it meant they could reuse the already-built ''Enterprise'' Enterprise bridge set.set, especially after the preceding film had proved so notoriously expensive.


** ''Wrath of Khan'' does a good job of integrating into the plot Khan spends most of the movie in a stolen Starfleet ship, but it certainly didn't hurt that it meant they could reuse the already-built ''Enterprise'' bridge set.

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** ''Wrath of Khan'' does a good job of integrating into the plot why Khan spends most of the movie in a stolen Starfleet ship, but it certainly didn't hurt that it meant they could reuse the already-built ''Enterprise'' bridge set.

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** ''Wrath of Khan'' does a good job of integrating into the plot Khan spends most of the movie in a stolen Starfleet ship, but it certainly didn't hurt that it meant they could reuse the already-built ''Enterprise'' bridge set.


* In ''Series/PowerRangers'', one question even the show's youngest fans frequently asked during Megazord battles is why the rangers didn't disassemble the Megazord and fight individually more often (this was especially prevalent when they were fighting multiple monsters at once or an individual Zord had a useful ability the Megazord itself didn't, such as the ability to fly.) The obvious reason is that it's easier to film with a guy in a foam rubber suit than to design and work with multiple props for each individual Zord (some seasons only showed individual zords through a few repeated scenes of StockFootage.) It's telling that, on the odd occasion where the Zords had individual humanoid forms (such as the Shogunzords, Super Zeo Zords, or the [=RescueZords=]), we saw the rangers fighting individually a ''lot'' more.

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* In ''Series/PowerRangers'', ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', one question even the show's youngest fans frequently asked during Megazord battles is why the rangers didn't disassemble the Megazord and fight individually more often (this was especially prevalent when they were fighting multiple monsters at once or an individual Zord had a useful ability the Megazord itself didn't, such as the ability to fly.) The obvious reason is that it's easier to film with a guy in a foam rubber suit than to design and work with multiple props for each individual Zord (some seasons only showed individual zords through a few repeated scenes of StockFootage.) It's telling that, on the odd occasion where the Zords had individual humanoid forms (such as the Shogunzords, Super Zeo Zords, or the [=RescueZords=]), we saw the rangers fighting individually a ''lot'' more.


* The ''Film/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' pilot movie does this for a lot of the characters, but ''especially'' Comicbook/GreenLantern. In the comics, his [[RingOfPower Power Ring]] is capable of conjuring up anything he can imagine, while in the film, he conveniently sticks to creating easy-to-render items like chainsaws and umbrellas. Yes. Umbrellas.

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** Later Heisei-era films showed monsters mostly relying on beam attacks, as their impressive-looking suit designs became too bulky to do any physical moves more complex than "clumsy shuffle" and "wave tiny T-rex arms." Easier to just add some laser effects over the footage than find someone capable of fighting in a two-hundred-pound costume.
* The ''Film/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'' pilot movie does this for a lot of the characters, but ''especially'' Comicbook/GreenLantern. In the comics, his [[RingOfPower Power Ring]] is capable of conjuring up anything he can imagine, while in the film, he conveniently sticks to creating easy-to-render items like chainsaws and umbrellas. Yes. Umbrellas. These are expressed by having the actor hold something and then it being given a green glow effect.

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** There's a bit of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness at play as well. The Force in the original Star Wars was very different from what it later became. Jedi were more like the Bene Gesserit of Dune, with a bunch of mental tricks to enhance their own performance and influence the minds of others, but with no overt power over the physical world. Even Darth Vader choking Admiral Motti was supposed to be a mental compulsion to stop breathing rather than physical strangulation. This is why people like Han Solo think the Force is 'simple tricks and nonsense'. It wasn't until Empire that things like telekinesis and physical enhancement started being added to the Jedi repertoire, making Han's statement seem more out of place with each installment.


** This is also why so many early Pixar films deal with subjects that are easier to animate than [[UncannyValley humans with normal proportions, hair, and clothing]]. [[WesternAnimation/ToyStory Toys]] are supposed to look like plastic, [[WesternAnimation/ABugsLife bugs]] and [[[[WesternAnimation/FindingNemo fish]] are cartoonish and shiny-skinned, the vast majority of [[WesternAnimation/MonstersInc monsters]] (with one or two big exceptions; many articles of the time talked about the work gone into rendering Sully) are hairless and look completely unrealistic anyway. Even ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' is steeped in a genre that basically goes hand-in-hand with exaggerated designs and tight spandex. It wasn't until their [[WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}} eighth film]] that they felt comfortable doing an almost entirely human cast (with the only exceptions being covered in fur) wearing normal clothing and in a realistic urban setting for the entire film.

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** This is also why so many early Pixar films deal with subjects that are easier to animate than [[UncannyValley humans with normal proportions, hair, and clothing]]. [[WesternAnimation/ToyStory Toys]] are supposed to look like plastic, [[WesternAnimation/ABugsLife bugs]] and [[[[WesternAnimation/FindingNemo [[WesternAnimation/FindingNemo fish]] are cartoonish and shiny-skinned, the vast majority of [[WesternAnimation/MonstersInc monsters]] (with one or two big exceptions; many articles of the time talked about the work gone into rendering Sully) are hairless and look completely unrealistic anyway. Even ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' is steeped in a genre that basically goes hand-in-hand with exaggerated designs and tight spandex. It wasn't until their [[WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}} eighth film]] that they felt comfortable doing an almost entirely human cast (with the only exceptions being covered in fur) wearing normal clothing and in a realistic urban setting for the entire film.

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** This is also why so many early Pixar films deal with subjects that are easier to animate than [[UncannyValley humans with normal proportions, hair, and clothing]]. [[WesternAnimation/ToyStory Toys]] are supposed to look like plastic, [[WesternAnimation/ABugsLife bugs]] and [[[[WesternAnimation/FindingNemo fish]] are cartoonish and shiny-skinned, the vast majority of [[WesternAnimation/MonstersInc monsters]] (with one or two big exceptions; many articles of the time talked about the work gone into rendering Sully) are hairless and look completely unrealistic anyway. Even ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' is steeped in a genre that basically goes hand-in-hand with exaggerated designs and tight spandex. It wasn't until their [[WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}} eighth film]] that they felt comfortable doing an almost entirely human cast (with the only exceptions being covered in fur) wearing normal clothing and in a realistic urban setting for the entire film.


** ''HikouninSentaiAkibaranger'' shows the alternative. Watch the series and you'll notice that, for a Super Sentai parody/installment, there are very few instances where they use the show's zord, the Itassha Robo. Not only does the Itassha Robo have a very odd design that'd be challenging for a suit actor, but it's very small by the standards of sentai mecha, meaning that model cities are off-limits (and would probably blow the budget even if the zord were larger). As a result, it's always portrayed with CGI, which is expensive enough that it's only showed in a couple episodes.

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** ''HikouninSentaiAkibaranger'' ''Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger'' shows the alternative. Watch the series and you'll notice that, for a Super Sentai parody/installment, there are very few instances where they use the show's zord, the Itassha Robo. Not only does the Itassha Robo have a very odd design that'd be challenging for a suit actor, but it's very small by the standards of sentai mecha, meaning that model cities are off-limits (and would probably blow the budget even if the zord were larger). As a result, it's always portrayed with CGI, which is expensive enough that it's only showed in a couple episodes.


* In ''Series/PowerRangers'', one question even the show's youngest fans frequently asked during Megazord battles is why the rangers didn't disassemble the Megazord and fight individually more often (this was especially prevalent when they were fighting multiple monsters at once or an individual Zord had a useful ability the Megazord itself didn't, such as the ability to fly.) The obvious reason is that it's easier to film with a guy in a foam rubber suit than to design and work with multiple props for each individual Zord (some seasons only showed individual zords through a few repeated scenes of StockFootage.) It's telling that, on the odd occasion where the Zords had individual humanoid forms (such as the Shogunzords, Super Zeo Zords, or the [=RescueZords=],) we saw the rangers fighting individually a ''lot'' more.

to:

* In ''Series/PowerRangers'', one question even the show's youngest fans frequently asked during Megazord battles is why the rangers didn't disassemble the Megazord and fight individually more often (this was especially prevalent when they were fighting multiple monsters at once or an individual Zord had a useful ability the Megazord itself didn't, such as the ability to fly.) The obvious reason is that it's easier to film with a guy in a foam rubber suit than to design and work with multiple props for each individual Zord (some seasons only showed individual zords through a few repeated scenes of StockFootage.) It's telling that, on the odd occasion where the Zords had individual humanoid forms (such as the Shogunzords, Super Zeo Zords, or the [=RescueZords=],) [=RescueZords=]), we saw the rangers fighting individually a ''lot'' more.


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** ''HikouninSentaiAkibaranger'' shows the alternative. Watch the series and you'll notice that, for a Super Sentai parody/installment, there are very few instances where they use the show's zord, the Itassha Robo. Not only does the Itassha Robo have a very odd design that'd be challenging for a suit actor, but it's very small by the standards of sentai mecha, meaning that model cities are off-limits (and would probably blow the budget even if the zord were larger). As a result, it's always portrayed with CGI, which is expensive enough that it's only showed in a couple episodes.


!!Examples

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!!Examples
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[[folder:Film -- Animated]]



[[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]






** The Doctor's few special powers are things that can be conveyed easily with solid acting and some basic camera tricks (even live camera tricks, if necessary) -- SuperIntelligence, a kind of HyperAwareness-like sense that allows him to know if he can change the outcome of an event or not, and some limited telepathy, hypnosis and EmotionControl PsychicPowers that he only uses once in a blue moon, which are usually conveyed by him grabbing someone else's head and looking into their eyes intensely. His most expensive ability is his regeneration ability, which has been achieved in various ways over the show's history such as a malfunctioning visual mixing desk, mixing together shots of actors' faces or CGI. He's also a HumanAlien, with his inhumanness generally conveyed by picking [[UncannyValley slightly otherworldly-looking]] actors who play him with lots of eccentric little CharacterTics.
** The First Doctor encountered two separate species of invisible aliens at various points when some element of peril was needed and yet too much money had been blown on a serial by that point -- notably the Visians on Mira in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan "The Daleks' Master Plan"]] (a very expensive 12-part SpaceOpera serial) and the Refusians in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E6TheArk "The Ark"]] (the first part of which involved live toucans and elephants and some simply gorgeous {{Matte Shot}}s). Neither is shown physically interacting with anything, save for the Visian being shown in InvisibilityFlicker when the Daleks exterminate it. A related invisibility sequence concerns the fate befalling the Doctor in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E7TheCelestialToymaker "The Celestial Toymaker"]], in which the Toymaker is explained to be able to phase the Doctor [[RealityIsOutToLunch in and out of tangibility]] for his amusement -- William Hartnell's health was suffering by that time, and the conceit allowed Hartnell to have more time off if he needed it. Then there's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction "The Edge of Destruction"]], a BottleEpisode in which the NegativeSpaceWedgie is represented by the TARDIS doors opening and closing, leading to the crew to speculate there might be an invisible monster in the TARDIS.
** The first appearance of the Daleks in the second serial was an early version of this trope. Only two actual moving Daleks are shown at any point, the rest are painted backdrops.

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** The Doctor's few special powers are things that can be conveyed easily with solid acting and some basic camera tricks (even live camera tricks, if necessary) -- SuperIntelligence, a kind of HyperAwareness-like sense that allows him to know if he can change the outcome of an event or not, and some limited telepathy, hypnosis and EmotionControl PsychicPowers that he only uses once in a blue moon, which are usually conveyed by him grabbing someone else's head and looking into their eyes intensely. His most expensive ability is his regeneration ability, which has been achieved in various ways over the show's history such as a malfunctioning visual mixing desk, mixing together shots of actors' faces or CGI. He's also a HumanAlien, with his inhumanness generally conveyed by picking [[UncannyValley slightly otherworldly-looking]] actors who play him with lots of eccentric little CharacterTics.
** The First Doctor encountered two separate species of invisible aliens at various points when some element of peril was needed and yet too much money had been blown on a serial by that point -- notably the Visians on Mira in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan "The Daleks' Master Plan"]] (a very expensive 12-part SpaceOpera serial) and the Refusians in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E6TheArk "The Ark"]] (the first part of which involved live toucans and elephants and some simply gorgeous {{Matte Shot}}s). Neither is shown physically interacting with anything, save for the Visian being shown in InvisibilityFlicker when the Daleks exterminate it. A related invisibility sequence concerns the fate befalling the Doctor in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E7TheCelestialToymaker "The Celestial Toymaker"]], in which the Toymaker is explained to be able to phase the Doctor [[RealityIsOutToLunch in and out of tangibility]] for his amusement -- William Hartnell's health was suffering by that time, and the conceit allowed Hartnell to have more time off if he needed it. Then there's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction "The Edge of Destruction"]], a BottleEpisode in which the NegativeSpaceWedgie is represented by the TARDIS doors opening and closing, leading to the crew to speculate there might be an invisible monster in the TARDIS.
** The first appearance of the Daleks in the [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks second serial serial]] was an early version of this trope. Only two actual moving Daleks are shown at any point, the rest are painted backdrops.



** A common criticism of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E4TheEnemyOfTheWorld "The Enemy of the World"]] is that the climactic defeat of the villain is a very rushed sequence of him getting sucked out of the TARDIS into the Vortex. The sequence was intended to go on longer, but the villain is played by Creator/PatrickTroughton ActingForTwo and the early split-screen effects needed to put both of them on screen at once turned out to be harder and more expensive than the BBC had thought. (Of course, technology has now improved to the point that Clara can talk to a whole army of time-looped versions of herself in a NoBudget online [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33ShortClaraAndTheTardis minisode]].)
** In the original-series story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E4TheMutants "The Mutants"]], an alien transforms through several stages from a humanoid, through a lobster-like creature, to a glowing, floating alien. For most of the transformation, the camera shows a close-up of his hand, only requiring work from makeup and costumes for the hand rather than full-body work that would only be seen for a few seconds.
** The TARDIS is at the very least the size of a city but is likely infinite, and shifts around from time to time depending on its own whims. We spent very little time there in the old series, only visiting some corridors ("played" by an abandoned hospital) and a handful of rooms. Even in the new series, we rarely see much further than the main control room -- we've seen some corridors, a swimming pool, a wardrobe, a library and part of its processors, but not much else. Most of what we know about its insides comes from the dialogue and from the ExpandedUniverse, which has no budget constraints and thus can be TheWonderland -- the novelisation of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E6Shada "Shada"]], for example, contained a scene where Chris spends a night in the TARDIS guest suite and discovers that his "bath" is an Olympic-sized swimming pool with clawed feet on the end.

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** A common criticism of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E4TheEnemyOfTheWorld "The Enemy of the World"]] is that the climactic defeat of the villain is a very rushed sequence of him getting sucked out of the TARDIS into the Vortex. The sequence was intended to go on longer, but the villain is played by Creator/PatrickTroughton ActingForTwo and the early split-screen effects needed to put both of them on screen at once turned out to be harder and more expensive than the BBC had thought. (Of course, technology has now improved to the point that Clara can talk to a whole army of time-looped versions of herself in a NoBudget online [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33ShortClaraAndTheTardis [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33ShortClaraAndTheTARDIS minisode]].)
** In the original-series story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E4TheMutants "The Mutants"]], an alien transforms through several stages from a humanoid, through a lobster-like creature, to a glowing, floating alien. For most of the transformation, the camera shows a close-up of his hand, only requiring work from makeup and costumes for the hand rather than full-body work that would only be seen for a few seconds.
** The TARDIS is at the very least the size of a city but is likely infinite, and shifts around from time to time depending on its own whims. We spent very little time there in the old series, only visiting some corridors ("played" by an abandoned hospital) and a handful of rooms. Even in the new series, we rarely see much further than the main control room -- we've seen some corridors, a swimming pool, a wardrobe, a library and part of its processors, but not much else. Most of what we know about its insides comes from the dialogue and from the ExpandedUniverse, which has no budget constraints and thus can be TheWonderland -- the novelisation of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E6Shada "Shada"]], for example, contained a scene where Chris spends a night in the TARDIS guest suite and discovers that his "bath" is an Olympic-sized swimming pool with clawed feet on the end.end.
** Kamelion the shapeshifting robot in Season 21 is an interesting example; in this case they ''had'' the special effect (an actual remote controlled robot of apparently hideous complexity), but following the death of its inventor, they'd no idea how to ''use'' it. As a result, Kamelion either took human form or just didn't appear. Usually the latter.



** Kamelion the shapeshifting robot in Season 21 is an interesting example; in this case they ''had'' the special effect (an actual remote controlled robot of apparently hideous complexity), but following the death of its inventor, they'd no idea how to ''use'' it. As a result, Kamelion either took human form or just didn't appear. Usually the latter.

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** Kamelion [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E8HumanNature "Human Nature"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E9TheFamilyOfBlood "The Family of Blood"]] gives its villains an invisible spaceship, convenient for both camouflage and the shapeshifting robot in Season 21 is an interesting example; in this case they ''had'' the special effect (an actual remote controlled robot of apparently hideous complexity), but following the death of its inventor, they'd no idea how to ''use'' it. As a result, Kamelion either took human form or just didn't appear. Usually the latter.FX budget.


* The first three seasons of ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' had numerous stunts involving Prue's telekinesis, but budget cuts lead to her replacement Paige having the ability to remotely teleport objects instead, which turns out to be more efficient given that it's easier to add a few CGI effects than to set up and insure stunts that involve flying through the air. Chris, introduced in the sixth season, also had telekinesis, but rarely used it. Billie, in season eight, ALSO had telekinesis, but rarely threw demons into walls the way Prue did.

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* The first three seasons of ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' ''Series/{{Charmed|1998}}'' had numerous stunts involving Prue's telekinesis, but budget cuts lead to her replacement Paige having the ability to remotely teleport objects instead, which turns out to be more efficient given that it's easier to add a few CGI effects than to set up and insure stunts that involve flying through the air. Chris, introduced in the sixth season, also had telekinesis, but rarely used it. Billie, in season eight, ALSO had telekinesis, but rarely threw demons into walls the way Prue did.


** ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'' gives all of the Riders and Worms the ability to [[TimeStandsStill Clock Up]]], which is actually a pretty good special effect during the first quarter of the show, but is almost completely forgotten in its last 20 episodes or so.

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** ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'' gives all of the Riders and Worms the ability to [[TimeStandsStill Clock Up]]], Up]], which is actually a pretty good special effect during the first quarter of the show, but is almost completely forgotten in its last 20 episodes or so.



** ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'''s Suika Arms, a watermelon-themed MiniMecha.

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** ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'''s ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'' gives Suika Arms, a watermelon-themed MiniMecha.MiniMecha, a recharge period with no clear timer to justify not using it often.
** ''Series/KamenRiderDrive'' gains the ability to use all 27 of his previous powers in sets of three in his Type Tridoron form, of which he only uses 9. Most of the individual powers themselves only appear once, or in some cases never get used at all.


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** ''Series/KamenRiderBuild'' uses his [=TurtleWatch=] Best Match entirely offscreen to avoid the expense of having to make a costume and effects for it. His later Genius Form is similarly supposed to be able to use all 60 powers of his previous forms, but during the show only uses Diamond, and that only a single time.


* Present in several ''Franchise/KamenRider'' series. There is almost always at least one attack or form that's too CG intensive to be used more than once or twice throughout the entire show (and the movies, where the budget is less tight); meanwhile, forms that require little to no additional SFX budget, like sword and unarmed combat-based ones, get most of the screentime. Examples of this trope across the franchise include:
** The HoverBoard mode of Series/KamenRiderAgito's CoolBike.
** Series/KamenRiderOOO's Gatakiriba Combo, whose main power is a DoppelgangerAttack.
** Series/KamenRiderGaim's Suika Arms, a watermelon-themed MiniMecha.
** Series/KamenRiderGhost's [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven Damashii]], which [[MusicalAssassin fights with music]].
** There are also cases of a series' specific gimmick, that while showcased very flashily in the earlier episodes, gets gradually phased out and ends up barely seen if at all in the later half of the show. [[TimeStandsStill Clock-Up]] in ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'', while being a showcase of actually pretty good special effects for toku in the first quarter of the show, is almost completely forgotten in its last 20 episodes or so.

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* Present in several ''Franchise/KamenRider'' series. There is almost always at least one attack attack, form, or form series gimmick that's too CG intensive to be used more than once or twice throughout the entire show (and the movies, where the budget is less tight); meanwhile, forms that require little to no additional SFX budget, like sword and unarmed combat-based ones, get most of the screentime. Examples of this trope across the franchise include:
** The HoverBoard mode of Series/KamenRiderAgito's ''Series/KamenRiderAgito'''s CoolBike.
** Series/KamenRiderOOO's ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'' gives all of the Riders and Worms the ability to [[TimeStandsStill Clock Up]]], which is actually a pretty good special effect during the first quarter of the show, but is almost completely forgotten in its last 20 episodes or so.
** ''Series/KamenRiderOOO'''s
Gatakiriba Combo, whose main power is a DoppelgangerAttack.
DoppelgangerAttack, is only used twice in the show.
** Series/KamenRiderGaim's ''Series/KamenRiderWizard'' manages to actually avoid this for the most part, including making frequent use of effects like Copy that just two years previously were devastating to a budget. However, even Wizard can't handle the expense and difficulty of filming fights using All Dragon Style, a part-costume part-CGI form that's only used twice.
** ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'''s
Suika Arms, a watermelon-themed MiniMecha.
** Series/KamenRiderGhost's ''Series/KamenRiderGhost'''s Riders and their opponents all tend to forget that they have the ability to fly and become intangible. On top of this, [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven Damashii]], which [[MusicalAssassin fights with music]].
** There are also cases
music]], usually gets sidelined in favor of a series' specific gimmick, forms that while showcased very flashily in the earlier episodes, gets gradually phased out and ends up barely seen if at all in the later half of the show. [[TimeStandsStill Clock-Up]] in ''Series/KamenRiderKabuto'', while being a showcase of actually pretty good special effects for toku in the first quarter of the show, is almost completely forgotten in its last 20 episodes or so. use weapons.

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