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* In the Literature/ModestyBlaise novel ''The Night of Morningstar'', Modesty and Willie are captured by the terrorist organization they've been investigating. The BigBad's second-in-command is in favor of killing them straight away to make sure they don't cause any more trouble, but the Big Bad sets his heart on an elaborate scheme in which they'll be kept alive until the terrorists' next, imminent, attack and used in a DeceasedFallGuyGambit. Modesty escapes from her restraints and she and Willie sink the villainous plot.

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* In the Literature/ModestyBlaise novel novels:
** In ''A Taste for Death'', Modesty and Willie are captured by the bad guys. The head villain of the group runs on ItAmusedMe and insists on keeping them alive to die in some slow and entertaining way, despite two of his underlings (who have lost to Modesty and Willie before) advocating that they should kill both straight away.
** In
''The Night of Morningstar'', Modesty and Willie are captured by the terrorist organization they've been investigating. The BigBad's second-in-command is in favor of killing them straight away to make sure they don't cause any more trouble, but the Big Bad sets his heart on an elaborate scheme in which they'll be kept alive until the terrorists' next, imminent, attack and used in a DeceasedFallGuyGambit. Modesty escapes from her restraints and she and Willie sink the villainous plot.


* In the Literature/ModestyBlaise novel ''The Night of Morningstar'', Modesty and Willie are captured by the terrorist organization they've been investigating. The BigBad's second-in-command is in favor of killing them straight away to make sure they don't cause any trouble, but the Big Bad sets his heart on an elaborate scheme in which they'll be kept alive until the terrorists' next, imminent, attack and used in a DeceasedFallGuyGambit. Modesty escapes from her restraints and she and Willie sink the villainous plot.

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* In the Literature/ModestyBlaise novel ''The Night of Morningstar'', Modesty and Willie are captured by the terrorist organization they've been investigating. The BigBad's second-in-command is in favor of killing them straight away to make sure they don't cause any more trouble, but the Big Bad sets his heart on an elaborate scheme in which they'll be kept alive until the terrorists' next, imminent, attack and used in a DeceasedFallGuyGambit. Modesty escapes from her restraints and she and Willie sink the villainous plot.

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* In the Literature/ModestyBlaise novel ''The Night of Morningstar'', Modesty and Willie are captured by the terrorist organization they've been investigating. The BigBad's second-in-command is in favor of killing them straight away to make sure they don't cause any trouble, but the Big Bad sets his heart on an elaborate scheme in which they'll be kept alive until the terrorists' next, imminent, attack and used in a DeceasedFallGuyGambit. Modesty escapes from her restraints and she and Willie sink the villainous plot.


Bond Villain Stupidity is a form of ignorance commonly exhibited by villains. It occurs when a villain fails to kill the hero when he has him cornered, incapacitated, or otherwise defenseless, thus giving the hero a chance to escape and later come back to defeat the villain. Essentially, this is where having too much ambition backfires; they lose sight of the matter at hand [[SkewedPriorities and turn their attention on all the wrong things.]] It is so named because it occurs frequently in ''Film/JamesBond'' movies. A common form of Bond Villain Stupidity is to place the hero in an elaborate DeathTrap from which he can escape (slow dipping mechanisms over [[SharkPool pits of sharks, alligators]], [[AcidPool acid]], [[LavaPit or lava]] are perennial favorites). If you ever asked [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim why the villains don't just shoot him]] then use their pets/lava to dispose of the body, then congratulations, you are smarter than the average megalomaniac. Also common is the inability to resist a JustBetweenYouAndMe moment before putting the hero in said death trap. Several variants of this one made the EvilOverlordList.

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Bond Villain Stupidity is a form of ignorance commonly exhibited by villains. It occurs when a villain fails to kill the hero when he has him cornered, incapacitated, or otherwise defenseless, thus giving the hero a chance to escape and later come back to defeat the villain. Essentially, this is where having too much ambition backfires; they lose sight of the matter at hand [[SkewedPriorities and turn their attention on all the wrong things.]] It is so named because it occurs frequently in ''Film/JamesBond'' movies. A common form of Bond Villain Stupidity is to place the hero in an elaborate DeathTrap from which he can escape (slow dipping mechanisms over [[SharkPool pits of sharks, alligators]], [[AcidPool acid]], [[LavaPit or lava]] or [[DrowningPit simply water]] are perennial favorites). If you ever asked [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim why the villains don't just shoot him]] then use their pets/lava to dispose of the body, then congratulations, you are smarter than the average megalomaniac. Also common is the inability to resist a JustBetweenYouAndMe moment before putting the hero in said death trap. Several variants of this one made the EvilOverlordList.


* In Creator/TimBurton's ''Film/SleepyHollow'', [[spoiler:Katrina's stepmother]] has Katrina unconscious, isolated, and is armed with a pistol. Also, everyone believes [[spoiler:the stepmother is dead]], so no one would come looking for her later. Rather than just shooting Katrina, she decides to spend a lot of time [[spoiler:summoning the Headless Horseman]] to do the job, giving Katrina plenty of time to wake up and run away (though granted [[spoiler:the stepmother]] is hardly concerned when Katrina escapes, probably as she figures she's dead soon anyway).

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* In Creator/TimBurton's ''Film/SleepyHollow'', ''Film/SleepyHollow1999'', [[spoiler:Katrina's stepmother]] has Katrina unconscious, isolated, and is armed with a pistol. Also, everyone believes [[spoiler:the stepmother is dead]], so no one would come looking for her later. Rather than just shooting Katrina, she decides to spend a lot of time [[spoiler:summoning the Headless Horseman]] to do the job, giving Katrina plenty of time to wake up and run away (though granted [[spoiler:the stepmother]] is hardly concerned when Katrina escapes, probably as she figures she's dead soon anyway).


*** Although at one point Ultron gets GenreSavvy and lures Tony into thinking he's going to spiel about his grand plans before just ending the conversation and initiating the fight instead.

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*** Although at one point Ultron gets GenreSavvy and lures Tony into thinking he's going to spiel about his grand plans before just ending the conversation and initiating the fight instead.


* This is a recurring FatalFlaw for many of the ''Film/JamesBond'' villains to the point that it's become the TropeNamer. The antagonists in any ''Bond'' movie tend to [[EvilGloating gloat]] about their {{Evil Plan}}s, but by then, 007 has already cooked up a plan B to escape and defeat the baddies. Examples in chronological order:

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* This is a recurring FatalFlaw for many of the ''Film/JamesBond'' villains to the point that it's become the TropeNamer.{{Trope Namer|s}}. The antagonists in any ''Bond'' movie tend to [[EvilGloating gloat]] about their {{Evil Plan}}s, but by then, 007 has already cooked up a plan B to escape and defeat the baddies. Examples in chronological order:



*** After a dinner goes wrong, Dr. No orders his guards to beat Bond up and imprison him. 007 naturally escapes. Arguably justified in that this was the first Bond film, so nobody know how dangerous he could be.

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*** After a dinner goes wrong, Dr. No orders his guards to beat Bond up and imprison him. 007 naturally escapes. Arguably justified in that this was the first Bond film, so nobody know knew how dangerous he could be.



*** [[spoiler:[[EvilAllAlong C/Max Denbigh]]]] himself is guilty of this, as he had many chances to kill M so he [[spoiler:won't hinder his EvilPlan to seize control of the world's intelligence agencies and forward the collected intel to SPECTRE, but opts to go for BreakThemByTalking near the climax. He also failed to realize that M managed to do a sweep of his office and empty his gun before C gets there, being that M is a former field agent unlike C, who's more of a corrupt paper-shuffler and ObstructiveBureaucrat. He finally tries to kill M, but M manages to grab C's gun and send him down a DisneyVillainDeath.]]
** [[http://www.empireonline.com/features/bond-villain-monologues/ Empire]] listed the [[EvilGloating Bond Villain Monologues]], while stating on all "[[StatingTheSimpleSolution What he should have done]]: [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim Shot Him]]", save ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''. There, the villain should have "Bought Website/{{Google}}." To be fair, General Whittaker in ''Film/TheLivingDaylights'' only monologued to distract Bond as a remote control gun was aiming to shoot him.

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*** [[spoiler:[[EvilAllAlong C/Max Denbigh]]]] himself is guilty of this, as he had many chances to kill M so he [[spoiler:won't hinder his EvilPlan to seize control of the world's intelligence agencies and forward the collected intel to SPECTRE, but opts to go for BreakThemByTalking near the climax. He also failed to realize that M managed to do a sweep of his office and empty his gun before C gets there, being that M is a former field agent unlike C, who's more of a corrupt paper-shuffler and ObstructiveBureaucrat. He finally tries to kill M, but M manages to grab C's gun and send him down a DisneyVillainDeath.]]
DisneyVillainDeath]].
** [[http://www.[[https://www.empireonline.com/features/bond-villain-monologues/ com/movies/features/bond-villain-monologues/ Empire]] listed the [[EvilGloating Bond Villain Monologues]], while stating on all "[[StatingTheSimpleSolution What he should have done]]: [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim Shot Him]]", save ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''. There, the villain should have "Bought Website/{{Google}}." To be fair, General Whittaker in ''Film/TheLivingDaylights'' only monologued to distract Bond as a remote control gun was aiming to shoot him.



* After [[CurbStompBattle stomping]] [[Manga/MahouSenseiNegima Negi]] and his team, Fate decides they aren't completely worthless because they ''barely'' pulled off [[strike:a recovery]] not dying of the wounds he inflicted. Instead of, you know, killing them in the face like he's clearly capable of, he says 'Okay I'm bored just gonna blow the gate up now. By the way, you suck Negi. Go level grind moar. Later' [[spoiler:May be justified in that he intended to use Negi and seems oddly reluctant to actually kill people. Also definitely planning on using Asuna for something, but we don't know what yet]]. It eventually turns out that [[spoiler:he's capable of [[RealityWarper changing the reality of the magic world on a whim]], so his belief that they pose him no threat is at least partially justified]].

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* ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'': After [[CurbStompBattle stomping]] [[Manga/MahouSenseiNegima Negi]] Negi and his team, Fate decides they aren't completely worthless because they ''barely'' pulled off [[strike:a recovery]] not dying of the wounds he inflicted. Instead of, you know, killing them in the face like he's clearly capable of, he says 'Okay I'm bored just gonna blow the gate up now. By the way, you suck Negi. Go level grind moar. Later' [[spoiler:May be justified in that he intended to use Negi and seems oddly reluctant to actually kill people. Also definitely planning on using Asuna for something, but we don't know what yet]]. It eventually turns out that [[spoiler:he's capable of [[RealityWarper changing the reality of the magic world on a whim]], so his belief that they pose him no threat is at least partially justified]].



* ''Manga/OnePiece':

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* ''Manga/OnePiece':''Manga/OnePiece'':



** Despite being a supergenius, ComicBook/DoctorDoom falls prey to this a lot whenever he's trying to kill his hated ArchEnemy Reed Richards. This is sort of justified though, because Doom's end goal isn't killing Reed — it's proving to Reed that Doom is smarter than him, and ''then'' killing him. Therefore, killing Reed without gloating about how he has been outsmarted and making him watch Doom TakeOverTheWorld and kill everyone Reed loves isn't just a tad disappointing to Doom — it would be completely antithetical to Doom's entire purpose in being evil.

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** Despite being a supergenius, ComicBook/DoctorDoom falls prey to this a lot whenever he's trying to kill his hated ArchEnemy [[ComicBook/MisterFantastic Reed Richards.Richards]]. This is sort of justified though, because Doom's end goal isn't killing Reed — it's proving to Reed that Doom is smarter than him, and ''then'' killing him. Therefore, killing Reed without gloating about how he has been outsmarted and making him watch Doom TakeOverTheWorld and kill everyone Reed loves isn't just a tad disappointing to Doom — it would be completely antithetical to Doom's entire purpose in being evil.



* ''WesternAnimation/MickeyDonaldGoofyTheThreeMusketeers'' has Pete doing this to Mickey. This is notable in that he averts this with WesternAnimation/{{Goofy}} and WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck, who he flat out attempts to kill.



-->'''David Christopher Bell''': So let me get this straight, Vanky: Instead of just killing Tony, your plan is to show the world that he's weak ... and therefore cause others to kill him? Did I mention that [[WhatAnIdiot he says this while sitting across from an unarmed Tony in an unguarded jail cell, fully capable of killing him with his bare hands]]?

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-->'''David --->'''David Christopher Bell''': So let me get this straight, Vanky: Instead of just killing Tony, your plan is to show the world that he's weak ... and therefore cause others to kill him? Did I mention that [[WhatAnIdiot he says this while sitting across from an unarmed Tony in an unguarded jail cell, fully capable of killing him with his bare hands]]?



*** When Rey confronts him, he tells her [[spoiler:he wants her to kill him so that he and the souls of the rest of the Sith can possess her and turn her to the Dark Side]] which she would have done anyway if he hadn't explained this. Result: [[spoiler:she refuses and the amount of time he wastes doing the "allow me to possess you or all of your friends will die" speech is enough for a reformed Ben Solo [[BigDamnHeroes to charge in to help her]].]]

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*** When Rey confronts him, he tells her [[spoiler:he wants her to kill him so that he and the souls of the rest of the Sith can possess her and turn her to the Dark Side]] which she would have done anyway if he hadn't explained this. Result: [[spoiler:she refuses and the amount of time he wastes doing the "allow me to possess you or all of your friends will die" speech is enough for a reformed Ben Solo [[BigDamnHeroes to charge in to help her]].]]her]]]].



* ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'': Robin survives Poison Ivy's kiss and reveals to her he was wearing rubber lips. Robin is still sitting right next to Ivy as he says this with their faces still only a few inches apart, but instead of grabbing Robin and giving him another more forceful and less romantic kiss to kill him for sure she just glares at him for tricking her and shoves him off her throne and into the pond to drown him instead. Then instead of staying to make sure Robin drowns so her plans remain a secret she attempts to leave, just saying a mocking "see ya!" to Robin. It's like she was treating the whole thing like she was breaking up with Robin instead of trying to kill him.

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* ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'': Robin survives Poison Ivy's ComicBook/PoisonIvy's kiss and reveals to her he was wearing rubber lips. Robin is still sitting right next to Ivy as he says this with their faces still only a few inches apart, but instead of grabbing Robin and giving him another more forceful and less romantic kiss to kill him for sure she just glares at him for tricking her and shoves him off her throne and into the pond to drown him instead. Then instead of staying to make sure Robin drowns so her plans remain a secret she attempts to leave, just saying a mocking "see ya!" to Robin. It's like she was treating the whole thing like she was breaking up with Robin instead of trying to kill him.



** The novels ''Discworld/MenAtArms'' and ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'' both explain that bad guys don't kill the good guys straight away because they want to gloat, and make sure the good guy ''knows'' he's been beaten. In the first book it serves to show Carrot as a Good Man because he straightforwardly kills the bad guy without explanation; in the second it gives Granny Weatherwax a NotSoDifferent moment, since she rather likes people she's defeated to know about it as well.
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d and neatly subverted in ''Discworld/{{Mort}}''. Mort, Princess Keli, the wizard Cutwell and others being surrounded by the villainous Duke, who Cutwell correctly identifies as "not the kind of man who ties you up in a cellar with just enough time for the mice to eat your ropes before the flood-waters rise. This is the kind of man who just kills you here and now." Also played straight in that the Duke is willing to offer them life-long banishment (we know how well that kind of thing turns out).

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** The novels ''Discworld/MenAtArms'' ''Literature/MenAtArms'' and ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'' ''Literature/WitchesAbroad'' both explain that bad guys don't kill the good guys straight away because they want to gloat, and make sure the good guy ''knows'' he's been beaten. In the first book it serves to show Carrot as a Good Man because he straightforwardly kills the bad guy without explanation; in the second it gives Granny Weatherwax a NotSoDifferent moment, since she rather likes people she's defeated to know about it as well.
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d and neatly subverted in ''Discworld/{{Mort}}''.''Literature/{{Mort}}''. Mort, Princess Keli, the wizard Cutwell and others being surrounded by the villainous Duke, who Cutwell correctly identifies as "not the kind of man who ties you up in a cellar with just enough time for the mice to eat your ropes before the flood-waters rise. This is the kind of man who just kills you here and now." Also played straight in that the Duke is willing to offer them life-long banishment (we know how well that kind of thing turns out).



* ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'': The White Witch could have saved herself a lot of trouble if she'd just killed Edmund as soon as she met him. But in this case it's justified, since Edmund did not appear to represent any sort of threat personally, and she had a reasonable-seeming plan to use him to destroy her other enemies. She was in fact undone not by a flaw in her plan per se but but by Divine mercy. As Aslan points out, her knowledge went only back to the beginning of Time. She was unaware of key things that happened before that. At one point she ''is'' about to kill him, realizing that he's no longer necessary to her plans, and in the middle of sharpening her knife when Edmund (currently tied to a tree) is rescued. The only reason the Witch initially kept Edmund alive was because she learned he had two sisters and a brother, fitting the prophecy that two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve would reclaim Narnia, and thus hoped to get all four dead or [[TakenForGranite petrified]] and be done with it. Her plan almost did work at one point, when the other three Pevensie siblings seriously gave thought to breaking into the Witch's castle to save Edmund, but were talked out of it by the Beavers. She finally gives up on the plan when the three Pevensie siblings reach Caer Paravel thus making their capture impossible, and realizes that simply killing Edmund would stop the prophecy from being fulfilled. By ''that'' point, the other assassins she'd sent to kill the children failed, and were used to track down and save Edmund.

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* ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'': The White Witch could have saved herself a lot of trouble if she'd just killed Edmund as soon as she met him. But in this case it's justified, since Edmund did not appear to represent any sort of threat personally, and she had a reasonable-seeming plan to use him to destroy her other enemies. She was in fact undone not by a flaw in her plan per se but but by Divine mercy. As Aslan points out, her knowledge went only back to the beginning of Time. She was unaware of key things that happened before that. At one point she ''is'' about to kill him, realizing that he's no longer necessary to her plans, and in the middle of sharpening her knife when Edmund (currently tied to a tree) is rescued. The only reason the Witch initially kept Edmund alive was because she learned he had two sisters and a brother, fitting the prophecy that two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve would reclaim Narnia, and thus hoped to get all four dead or [[TakenForGranite petrified]] and be done with it. Her plan almost did work at one point, when the other three Pevensie siblings seriously gave thought to breaking into the Witch's castle to save Edmund, but were talked out of it by the Beavers. She finally gives up on the plan when the three Pevensie siblings reach Caer Paravel thus making their capture impossible, and realizes that simply killing Edmund would stop the prophecy from being fulfilled. By ''that'' point, the other assassins she'd sent to kill the children failed, and were used to track down and save Edmund.



* Lampshaded and justified in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', when Taylor is teleported into a burning building, shot and left for dead while gunmen surround the building to make sure she doesn't get out. Afterwards, Taylor wonders why the villain responsible went to all that trouble when he could have just teleported her to a bomb and detonated it.
** Justified in that [[spoiler:when she asks Coil why he didn't do this, he admits that he tried to use a bomb repeatedly, and even teleporting her into a vat of acid, but the teleporter was built by Leet and went wrong whenever a bomb or acid was involved due to Leet's power actively sabotaging him, forcing Coil to keep changing the parameters of the scenario until he found a combination that wouldn't set off the inbuilt malfunction of the teleporter, and then Coil ran out of time due to the narrow window of opportunity and had to go with the burning building plan.]]

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* Lampshaded and justified in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', when Taylor is teleported into a burning building, shot and left for dead while gunmen surround the building to make sure she doesn't get out. Afterwards, Taylor wonders why the villain responsible went to all that trouble when he could have just teleported her to a bomb and detonated it.
**
it. Justified in that [[spoiler:when she asks Coil why he didn't do this, he admits that he tried to use a bomb repeatedly, and even teleporting her into a vat of acid, but the teleporter was built by Leet and went wrong whenever a bomb or acid was involved due to Leet's power actively sabotaging him, forcing Coil to keep changing the parameters of the scenario until he found a combination that wouldn't set off the inbuilt malfunction of the teleporter, and then Coil ran out of time due to the narrow window of opportunity and had to go with the burning building plan.]]plan]].



** [[spoiler: Hugo Strange]] in ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity''. Even though he knows you are the goddamned Franchise/{{Batman}}, he [[spoiler: doesn't take the opportunity to kill Bats at the beginning when Bruce was unconscious and shackled. He wakes you up and then dumps you into Arkham City without even bothering to track you. And ''then'' he tasks an assassin to kill you, suggesting that he wanted you dead the entire time. It's ultimately subverted once the real plan comes out. Batman finds the assassin's list, and Hugo tasked the assassin with killing Bruce Wayne first, THEN Batman, KNOWING that Bruce would be incognito as Batman. The whole thing was a ploy, to keep both Batman and Deadshot in Arkham City, so he could take out everyone with his aerial strikes.]]

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** [[spoiler: Hugo Strange]] in ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity''. Even though he knows you are the goddamned Franchise/{{Batman}}, he [[spoiler: doesn't take the opportunity to kill Bats at the beginning when Bruce was unconscious and shackled. He wakes you up and then dumps you into Arkham City without even bothering to track you. And ''then'' he tasks an assassin to kill you, suggesting that he wanted you dead the entire time. It's ultimately subverted once the real plan comes out. Batman finds the assassin's list, and Hugo tasked the assassin with killing Bruce Wayne first, THEN Batman, KNOWING that Bruce would be incognito as Batman. The whole thing was a ploy, to keep both Batman and Deadshot in Arkham City, so he could take out everyone with his aerial strikes.]]strikes]].



* Inverted in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne 3'', where Max has [[spoiler: Becker]] at his mercy and slowly strangles him rather than just give him a 9mm headache. This gives [[spoiler: Victor Branco]] time to show up. Max does it again immediately by holding off on disarming the newcomer until the first villain is recovered enough to stun him, allowing both villains to escape.
** Somewhat justified in that Max is ''extremely'' angry and a simple kill shot is too good for [[spoiler: Becker]], and he's honestly a little surprised at the appearance of [[spoiler: Victor]], and it takes him some time to process that before he makes his move.

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* Inverted in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne 3'', where Max has [[spoiler: Becker]] at his mercy and slowly strangles him rather than just give him a 9mm headache. This gives [[spoiler: Victor Branco]] time to show up. Max does it again immediately by holding off on disarming the newcomer until the first villain is recovered enough to stun him, allowing both villains to escape.
**
escape. Somewhat justified in that Max is ''extremely'' angry and a simple kill shot is too good for [[spoiler: Becker]], and he's honestly a little surprised at the appearance of [[spoiler: Victor]], and it takes him some time to process that before he makes his move.



* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'':

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* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'':''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'':



** [[spoiler: Zavok of the Deadly Six]] in ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld''. Instead of [[spoiler: personally supervising the roboticization of Tails, he and Zomom just leave him all alone in the lab. Being the SmartGuy he is, Tails successfully modifies the machine he's bound to to his own advantage]].

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** [[spoiler: Zavok of the Deadly Six]] in ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld''. Instead of [[spoiler: personally supervising the roboticization of Tails, he and Zomom just leave him all alone in the lab. Being the SmartGuy TheSmartGuy he is, Tails successfully modifies the machine he's bound to to his own advantage]].



* In ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'', during the climax of his arc, Abraham gives a long winded speech to Ellen about why he has to kill her instead of simply doing it, giving Nanase the time she needed to catch up to and stop him. {{Justified}}, in that he really doesn't want to go through with it.

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* In ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'', during the climax of his arc, Abraham gives a long winded speech to Ellen about why he has to kill her instead of simply doing it, giving Nanase the time she needed to catch up to and stop him. {{Justified}}, {{Justified|Trope}}, in that he really doesn't want to go through with it.



** In "[[Recap/TheAdventuresOfBatmanAndRobinE3Trial Trial]]", Batman's enemies have captured and restrained him, but instead of just killing him decide to put him on trial. [[KangarooCourt With]] the Joker as the [[HangingJudge judge]] and [[JokerJury Mad Hatter, Harley, and Croc as the Jury]]. The DA who stated that Batman should be put on trial was defense, and if she got him acquitted they'd both be set free, if she failed they'd both be killed. But then, [[SanityHasAdvantages what else would you expect from Batman's enemies?]] Two-Face at least ''did'' want to [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim just shoot him]], but lost the coin toss. They do try to kill him after the trial, but by then Batman and the DA manage to escape.

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** In "[[Recap/TheAdventuresOfBatmanAndRobinE3Trial Trial]]", Batman's enemies have captured and restrained him, but instead of just killing him decide to put him on trial. [[KangarooCourt With]] the Joker as the [[HangingJudge judge]] and [[JokerJury Mad Hatter, Harley, and Croc as the Jury]]. The DA who stated that Batman should be put on trial was his defense, and if she got him acquitted they'd both be set free, if she failed they'd both be killed. But then, [[SanityHasAdvantages what else would you expect from Batman's enemies?]] Two-Face at least ''did'' want to [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim just shoot him]], but lost the coin toss. They do try to kill him after the trial, but by then Batman and the DA manage to escape.



* ''WesternAnimation/MickeyDonaldGoofyTheThreeMusketeers'' has Pete doing this to Mickey. This is notable in that he averts this with WesternAnimation/{{Goofy}} and WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck, who he flat out attempts to kill.



-->'''Joker''': And they say ''I'm'' crazy.
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in "[[Recap/JusticeLeagueS2E17And18SecretSociety The Secret Society]]," where the members of the League are kept in stasis after being defeated by Grodd's LegionOfDoom. Clayface, [[GenreSavvy a former actor]], asks why they don't just kill the captive heroes right now, and compares the situation to the mistakes made by the villains in the spy films he used to appear in.
*** Note that Clayface is asking this while staring at Martian Manhunter. This is especially unusual because [[spoiler: Clayface and Martian Manhunter are both Shapeshifters and the villains froze the wrong shifter by mistake. This means that Martian Manhunter in this scene is asking why the bad guys don't kill his allies. It could be he already knew this, as Martian Manhunter is also a telepath and probably got the plan from Grodd's thoughts, and is only asking out loud because Clayface isn't a telepath and would ask this.]] This gets Grodd to unwittingly spill his plans to the heroes before the plan is set into motion.

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-->'''Joker''': --->'''Joker''': And they say ''I'm'' crazy.
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in "[[Recap/JusticeLeagueS2E17And18SecretSociety The Secret Society]]," where the members of the League are kept in stasis after being defeated by Grodd's LegionOfDoom. Clayface, [[GenreSavvy a former actor]], asks why they don't just kill the captive heroes right now, and compares the situation to the mistakes made by the villains in the spy films he used to appear in. \n*** Note that Clayface is asking this while staring at Martian Manhunter. This is especially unusual because [[spoiler: Clayface and Martian Manhunter are both Shapeshifters and the villains froze the wrong shifter by mistake. This means that Martian Manhunter in this scene is asking why the bad guys don't kill his allies. It could be he already knew this, as Martian Manhunter is also a telepath and probably got the plan from Grodd's thoughts, and is only asking out loud because Clayface isn't a telepath and would ask this.]] this]]. This gets Grodd to unwittingly spill his plans to the heroes before the plan is set into motion.

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* ''Film/TheAssignment2016'': Dr. Rachel Jane, instead of killing Frank (possibly after extended surgical torture) subjects him to an involuntary sex reassignment and leaves him alive that way, with ample ability to track her down. Later, when her {{mooks}} catch him, they also didn't search him at all it seems since they miss his hidden gun which he uses to shoot them after waking up.

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* During midterms in ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'', Mineta and Sero are put in a mock battle against the Pro Hero Midnight (playing the role of a villain the two have to subdue or escape past). Midnight knocks Sero out easily, but not before he slings Mineta out of range of her sleeping gas. Midnight admits she could just camp the exit until Mineta runs out of time and fails, but her sadistic streak rears up and she gives chase, giving Mineta time to regroup and trap Midnight for the win.

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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade'' has two examples from two different villains:
** [[StarterVillain Lord Lundgren]]'s entire plan is to kill his brother, the Marquess of Pherae, and take his throne. He opts for the slow, subtle route of poisoning the marquess' food, which seems smart enough - at first. But even after the marquess has survived ''months'' of poisoning, even after seemingly everyone in Pherae - including the marquess himself - has realised what Lundgren is up to, even when the legitimate heir to the throne is at the castle gates, Lundgren sticks with poison instead of just walking up to his helpless, bed-ridden brother and smothering him with a pillow. [[spoiler:The marquess survives. Lundgren does not.]]
** Ephidel very much downplays this when he kills Lord Helman [[YouKnowTooMuch to stop him from talking]]. Instead of finishing Helman off, he just leaves him to die, and Helman survives long enough to warn Eliwood about Darin and the Black Fang. Darin is understandably ''furious'' when he realises this.


** In ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'', Blofeld's guilty of it at least twice; first, he sends an assassin to kill Bond with an elaborate poison trick while he sleeps… you know, instead of shooting him or dropping a grenade on him or any of the myriad other ways to kill a sleeping guy from roughly the same distance. Later, he catches Bond in his base, and keeps him alive because he wants Bond to witness his success even though he really ought to know better than that by now. He even pulls an elaborate fakeout where [[BlofeldPloy he seems like he's about to shoot Bond, but shoots his own henchman instead at the last second]]. A little while after that, he finally tries to shoot Bond for real, but of course by then it's too late.

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** In ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'', Blofeld's guilty of it at least twice; first, he sends an assassin to kill Bond with an elaborate poison trick while he sleeps… you know, instead of shooting him or dropping a grenade on him or any of the myriad other ways to kill a sleeping guy from roughly the same distance. Later, he catches Bond in his base, and keeps him alive because he wants Bond to witness his success even though he really ought to know better than that by now. He even pulls an elaborate fakeout where [[BlofeldPloy he seems like he's about to shoot Bond, but shoots his own henchman instead at the last second]]. A little while after that, he finally tries to shoot Bond for real, but of course by then it's too late.late with Tiger Tanaka stopping him with a well-aimed shuriken.


** During the original ''Manga/DragonBall'', in his fight against Goku during the 22nd Tenkaichi Budokai, Tenshinhan, who was starting to feel overpowered by Goku's tremendous stamina and having several of his techniques outdone by Goku's very own, ingenuously decided that, if he could not knock Goku unconscious or push him out of the platform, he would simply destroy the entire platform; that way, Goku would lose by ring out because there would be no platform left to stand on. Tenshinhan, who possesses the ability to fly, did not have that problem. He managed to destroy the platform with his powerful Kikouhou, but instead of simply waiting for Goku, who had jumped very high to escape the blast, to hit the ground, he decided to fly close to him, accompanying Goku as he fell down, in order to gloat about his inevitable victory. That opened an opportunity for Goku to use one last attack that knocked Tenshinhan unconscious, and now both fighters were falling to the ground. Subverted because Tenshinhan, by a stroke of luck, actually won the fight, but he was likely in worse physical condition than Goku by the end of it.
*** In the manga he's a bit smarter; he intended to stay where he was and watch Goku fall, but Goku reacted quickly.

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** * During the original ''Manga/DragonBall'', in his fight against Goku during the 22nd Tenkaichi Budokai, Tenshinhan, who was starting to feel overpowered by Goku's tremendous stamina and having several of his techniques outdone by Goku's very own, ingenuously decided that, if he could not knock Goku unconscious or push him out of the platform, he would simply destroy the entire platform; that way, Goku would lose by ring out because there would be no platform left to stand on. Tenshinhan, who possesses the ability to fly, did not have that problem. He managed to destroy the platform with his powerful Kikouhou, but instead of simply waiting for Goku, who had jumped very high to escape the blast, to hit the ground, he decided to fly close to him, accompanying Goku as he fell down, in order to gloat about his inevitable victory. That opened an opportunity for Goku to use one last attack that knocked Tenshinhan unconscious, and now both fighters were falling to the ground. Subverted because Tenshinhan, by a stroke of luck, actually won the fight, but he was likely in worse physical condition than Goku by the end of it.
*** ** In the manga he's a bit smarter; he intended to stay where he was and watch Goku fall, but Goku reacted quickly.



** ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' has many examples of this:
*** Frieza shows that he completely outclasses Goku and the rest of the heroes while only fighting at 50% power and that he could kill all of them in an instant, and yet he toys with them and lets the fight drag on... until Goku transforms, that is. Frieza himself even lampshades the fact that he should probably just take Goku out right now after the 20x Kaioken, but he still keeps screwing around anyway. He lampshades it again after Goku transforms, kicking himself for not just killing Goku when he had the chance; by the time he realizes this, however, he has no hope of victory.
*** During the Cell Saga, Vegeta, after having trained for a year in the [[YearInsideHourOutside Room of Spirit and Time]], powers up to [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/Super_Saiyan_Second_Grade Super Saiyan Second Grade,]] and becomes much, much stronger than his opponent, Semi-Perfect Cell. Rather than finish him here, Vegeta lets Cell absorb Android 18 and upgrade to his Perfect form, lusting for a greater fight. Cue Perfect Cell completely [[CurbStompBattle Curb-Stomping]] Vegeta, and later Trunks. While Vegeta is on the good guys' side at this time, the effect is the same.
*** Vegeta also indulged in this as a villain during the Saiyan Saga, when he decided to wait for three hours for Goku to return to Earth so he and Nappa could crush the hopes of Earth's warriors.
*** Cell himself makes the exact same mistake. After ascending to his Perfect form, and defeating Piccolo, Vegeta, Trunks, and Android 16 in the process, he becomes the most powerful being on earth. Rather than kill everyone, he opts to give the Z-Fighters 10 days to prepare for a tournament. Those were probably the [[LegoGenetics Vegeta cells]] inside him, as Vegeta himself does this a few times as well, as mentioned above. Taken UpToEleven during his fight with Gohan, where, after discovering Gohan's hidden power, does everything he can to [[RageBreakingPoint piss Gohan off enough to unleash said power]] just because he wants a more challenging fight; keep in mind that he tricked Vegeta into doing the ''exact same thing'' in order to ascend to his Perfect form, and [[EvilGloating openly mocked Vegeta for being stupid enough to fall for it]].
*** ''Insanely'' {{inverted|Trope}} with [[OmnicidalManiac Majin Buu.]] He has the Z-Fighters cornered, but Piccolo makes [[ShootTheDog a sick choice that will buy them more time]] -- suggesting to Buu that it would be more fun to kill the rest of the humans on Earth in the meantime (knowing that they can reverse the damage with the Dragonballs if they can power up enough to survive the fight), [[WhatTheHellHero prompting horrified reactions all around]]. Buu [[NiceJobBreakingItHero simply kills the remaining survivors with one attack]], then proceeds to thin the numbers of the Z-Fighters and [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt blow up the world.]] '''[[EpicFail EPIC FAIL!]]'''

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** * ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' has many examples of this:
*** ** Frieza shows that he completely outclasses Goku and the rest of the heroes while only fighting at 50% power and that he could kill all of them in an instant, and yet he toys with them and lets the fight drag on... until Goku transforms, that is. Frieza himself even lampshades the fact that he should probably just take Goku out right now after the 20x Kaioken, but he still keeps screwing around anyway. He lampshades it again after Goku transforms, kicking himself for not just killing Goku when he had the chance; by the time he realizes this, however, he has no hope of victory.
*** ** During the Cell Saga, Vegeta, after having trained for a year in the [[YearInsideHourOutside Room of Spirit and Time]], powers up to [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/Super_Saiyan_Second_Grade Super Saiyan Second Grade,]] and becomes much, much stronger than his opponent, Semi-Perfect Cell. Rather than finish him here, Vegeta lets Cell absorb Android 18 and upgrade to his Perfect form, lusting for a greater fight. Cue Perfect Cell completely [[CurbStompBattle Curb-Stomping]] Vegeta, and later Trunks. While Vegeta is on the good guys' side at this time, the effect is the same.
*** ** Vegeta also indulged in this as a villain during the Saiyan Saga, when he decided to wait for three hours for Goku to return to Earth so he and Nappa could crush the hopes of Earth's warriors.
*** ** Cell himself makes the exact same mistake. After ascending to his Perfect form, and defeating Piccolo, Vegeta, Trunks, and Android 16 in the process, he becomes the most powerful being on earth. Rather than kill everyone, he opts to give the Z-Fighters 10 days to prepare for a tournament. Those were probably the [[LegoGenetics Vegeta cells]] inside him, as Vegeta himself does this a few times as well, as mentioned above. Taken UpToEleven during his fight with Gohan, where, after discovering Gohan's hidden power, does everything he can to [[RageBreakingPoint piss Gohan off enough to unleash said power]] just because he wants a more challenging fight; keep in mind that he tricked Vegeta into doing the ''exact same thing'' in order to ascend to his Perfect form, and [[EvilGloating openly mocked Vegeta for being stupid enough to fall for it]].
*** ** ''Insanely'' {{inverted|Trope}} with [[OmnicidalManiac Majin Buu.]] He has the Z-Fighters cornered, but Piccolo makes [[ShootTheDog a sick choice that will buy them more time]] -- suggesting to Buu that it would be more fun to kill the rest of the humans on Earth in the meantime (knowing that they can reverse the damage with the Dragonballs if they can power up enough to survive the fight), [[WhatTheHellHero prompting horrified reactions all around]]. Buu [[NiceJobBreakingItHero simply kills the remaining survivors with one attack]], then proceeds to thin the numbers of the Z-Fighters and [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt blow up the world.]] '''[[EpicFail EPIC FAIL!]]'''



*** {{Averted|Trope}} with Future Trunks. After improving by going back in time, he is much more powerful when he faces Android 17 and 18 and Imperfect Cell. He wastes no time [[CurbStompBattle Curb-Stomping]] them, making sure that they are gone. Makes sense, since he grew up in misery, watching all of his loved ones die, and saw his world destroyed by the Androids. He just wants them finished as soon as possible.

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*** ** {{Averted|Trope}} with Future Trunks. After improving by going back in time, he is much more powerful when he faces Android 17 and 18 and Imperfect Cell. He wastes no time [[CurbStompBattle Curb-Stomping]] them, making sure that they are gone. Makes sense, since he grew up in misery, watching all of his loved ones die, and saw his world destroyed by the Androids. He just wants them finished as soon as possible.


* This is a recurring FatalFlaw for many of the ''Film/JamesBond'' villains to the point that it's become the TropNamer. The antagonists in any ''Bond'' movie tend to [[EvilGloating gloat]] about their {{Evil Plan}}s, but by then, 007 has already cooked up a plan B to escape and defeat the baddies. Examples in chronological order:

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* This is a recurring FatalFlaw for many of the ''Film/JamesBond'' villains to the point that it's become the TropNamer.TropeNamer. The antagonists in any ''Bond'' movie tend to [[EvilGloating gloat]] about their {{Evil Plan}}s, but by then, 007 has already cooked up a plan B to escape and defeat the baddies. Examples in chronological order:


** In the first movie, Dr. Evil has Austin and Vanessa Kensington on an "unnecessarily slow-moving dipping mechanism" over a pit of mutant seabass. (He wanted sharks with FrickinLaserBeams attached to their heads, but [[RealityEnsues his organization couldn't clear up the red tape.) Right after that, Dr. Evil refuses to watch, just assuming that it's all going to go to plan. Scott lampshades the ridiculousness of it, saying that there's a gun in his room, and it would only take seconds to shoot them. Dr. Evil then remarks that Scott just doesn't get it.

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** In the first movie, Dr. Evil has Austin and Vanessa Kensington on an "unnecessarily slow-moving dipping mechanism" over a pit of mutant seabass. (He wanted sharks with FrickinLaserBeams attached to their heads, but [[RealityEnsues his organization couldn't clear up the red tape.tape]].) Right after that, Dr. Evil refuses to watch, just assuming that it's all going to go to plan. Scott lampshades the ridiculousness of it, saying that there's a gun in his room, and it would only take seconds to shoot them. Dr. Evil then remarks that Scott just doesn't get it.


[[folder:James Bond]]
* This is a recurring FatalFlaw for many of the ''Film/JamesBond'' villains to the point that it's become the TropNamer. The antagonists in any ''Bond'' movie tend to [[EvilGloating gloat]] about their {{Evil Plan}}s, but by then, 007 has already cooked up a plan B to escape and defeat the baddies. Examples in chronological order:
** ''Film/DrNo'':
*** After a dinner goes wrong, Dr. No orders his guards to beat Bond up and imprison him. 007 naturally escapes. Arguably justified in that this was the first Bond film, so nobody know how dangerous he could be.
*** In [[Literature/DrNo the book]], he also had Bond run through Dr. No's death course. Bond was close to dying through it, multiple times. As did everyone else Dr. No had "tested"; the course was designed to kill. The only difference Dr. No ever expected was how long it would take. Funny how much difference a stolen lighter and a steak knife (and Bond!) can make...
** In ''Film/FromRussiaWithLove'', Red Grant's plan is to [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim just shoot Bond]], and he actually manages to get the drop on his target and have him completely at his mercy, but he still fails because he can't resist indulging in some EvilGloating and a JustBetweenYouAndMe speech. In Red's defense, he still would have been fine if he hadn't fallen for Bond's bribe. At least he didn't leave the guy unattended, unlike most of the jokers on this list.
*** He'd also had plenty of opportunities to kill Bond before he even got on the train, but his failure to do so was his superior's fault: Red's boss' boss (Blofeld in the movie, General G in the novel) didn't just want Bond to die, he wanted him to die in a manner that would embarrass [=MI6=] and the British government, which required a more elaborate setup then just shooting him as he walked down the street.
** Averted ''and'' played straight by ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''. Audric Goldfinger was originally going to just have Bond sliced in half by a laser, but moments from loosing his manhood Bond himself points out that if he dies, then the [[UsefulNotes/SecretIntelligenceService Secret Service]] will just send in [[HeroOfAnotherStory some guy called 008]]. Goldfinger decides instead to keep Bond alive and trick his superiors into thinking Bond has the situation well in hand. This works, and Goldfinger's plan probably would have succeeded if Bond hadn't used the opportunity to [[HighHeelFaceTurn charm]] Pussy Galore.
*** In the same film, however, Goldfinger plays the trope straight in dealing with his gangster accomplices. While he is showing them his plan with an elaborate miniature Fort Knox, one gangster demands to leave and take his gold with him. They load the gold in a car and Oddjob drives him away, ostensibly to the airport. Oddjob kills him as soon as the gangster notices they aren't heading to the airport. Instead of just dumping the body, however he takes the car, with the body in it, to an auto yard where it is cubed. He then returns to the farm where Goldfinger says they will have to extract the gold from the car. The kicker is that, after that gangster left, Goldfinger had the room sealed and all the other gangsters gassed to death anyway. So why not just excuse himself for a minute, leaving that one guy with the others and kill them all at once as he had already planned to do, instead of destroying a car for no reason (and even then, why not just take the gold out of the car ''before'' making it a three foot by three foot cube, rather than ''after'')?
*** Notably, in the novel, the gangster who opted out of the plan "fell down the stairs" on his way out of the meeting, and the others all agreed to join the plan and were left alive, rather than the elaborate setup from the movie.
** ''Film/{{Thunderball}}'':
*** Fiona Volpe successfully seduces Bond - not that that's especially difficult to do - and doesn't do a HighHeelFaceTurn, but then monologues about it and generally screws around until Bond escapes, killing her shortly thereafter. Helga Brandt makes almost the exact same mistake a film later, though she's instead killed by her superior for being a moron.
*** BigBad Largo himself provides a classic example. He catches Bond in his pool fighting with one of his men. The mook with him is just about to shoot Bond, but Largo stops him and instead traps Bond in there to be eaten by his sharks. Naturally, Bond uses this to escape.
** In ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'', Blofeld's guilty of it at least twice; first, he sends an assassin to kill Bond with an elaborate poison trick while he sleeps… you know, instead of shooting him or dropping a grenade on him or any of the myriad other ways to kill a sleeping guy from roughly the same distance. Later, he catches Bond in his base, and keeps him alive because he wants Bond to witness his success even though he really ought to know better than that by now. He even pulls an elaborate fakeout where [[BlofeldPloy he seems like he's about to shoot Bond, but shoots his own henchman instead at the last second]]. A little while after that, he finally tries to shoot Bond for real, but of course by then it's too late.
** Justified in ''Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService'', where for once Blofeld actually has a sensible reason for keeping the captured 007 alive and explaining the plot to him: Bond as a government agent would be an external witness to his activities to verify his claims that he can actually release a "Virus Omega" and is not merely bluffing.
** In ''Film/DiamondsAreForever'', [[ThoseTwoBadGuys Mr. Wint and Mr. Kidd]] had Bond unconscious and they simply dumped him in an unfinished pipeline and left, [[SealedRoomInTheMiddleOfNowhere assuming he'd eventually die]]. Doubly stupid, as this was the ''second time'' the pair had been given an unconscious James Bond to dispose of; the first time they tried to burn him alive, which admittedly would have worked as he was only saved by other villains.
** Most of ''Film/LiveAndLetDie'' revolves around this, as the villains sequentially attempt an elaborate assassination involving a snake (despite having keys to his room), leave him unattended on a small island to be eaten by alligators, and finally try to have him fed to sharks - admittedly a classic - instead of just shooting him, despite by then having had enough experience with the guy to know better.
** ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'':
*** Bond takes up Hai Fat's invitation to join him for dinner in his mansion while pretending to be Scaramanga, not knowing that the ''real'' Scaramanga had already gotten in touch with the guy. When he arrives there late at night, he's incapacitated by some guards in an ambush. As they're about to kill him, Hai Fat forbids them from doing so because he doesn't want Bond killed in his home. They'll just take him somewhere else to finish him off, right? Nope. Hai Fat has Bond placed in a krabi krabong school to... get beaten up? Maybe?
*** Justifiably invoked by Scaramanga late in the film; he freely admits that he could have used his solar-powered laser to blow up Bond's plane before he even landed on the island, but chose not to do so because of how unsatisfying it would be. Scaramanga would like nothing better than to engage in a fair DuelToTheDeath with 007 himself.
** ''Film/ForYourEyesOnly'':
*** In TheTeaser, [[LawyerFriendlyCameo "Blofeld"]] opts to toy with Bond in the helicopter, instead of just crashing it as soon as he takes control. Justified in this case by the fact that "Blofeld" had looked forward to killing Bond for a long time and had been crippled by him - he wanted Bond to suffer.
*** The main villain is guilty of it as well, choosing to kill Bond and the Bond Girl by dragging them behind his boat and assuming sharks ate them when they finally disappeared as opposed to shooting them ''before'' throwing them overboard and then using the sharks to dispose of the evidence.
** ''Film/AViewToAKill'':
*** Early on, Zorin decides to kill Bond by rolling his car into a lake, presumably to MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. [[DownplayedTrope Downplayed]], though, as Zorin does try to get it done while James is still unconscious and even stays at the lake long enough to make sure James couldn't have survived (James ''does'' survive by spotting that Zorin was watching and using the air from the tire to stay underwater until Zorin left).
*** Later, Zorin has Bond at his mercy but decides to kill him by locking him in a museum and setting it on fire. Justified, however, in that he wants to frame Bond for the murder of someone else and make it look like he failed to escape after setting the museum on fire himself.
** Averted in ''Film/TheLivingDaylights'' as the villain's whole plan hinges on Bond killing someone on his say so and his own ability to look like the victim and/or hero. He does miss a good opportunity to kill Bond late in the film, but it's because he thinks sending Bond to jail will be better for his cover - which he'd be right about, if Bond hadn't already outsmarted him a few scenes before.
** Almost averted again in ''Film/LicenceToKill'' as the villain doesn't find out Bond's not on his side 'till very near the end, and when he does put Bond into his death trap he sticks around to watch until he's forced to leave because the place is on fire and about to explode, at which point he leaves his number two man in charge of finishing the job. Naturally, that goes poorly for him, but credit to Sanchez for getting so much closer to getting it right than most.
** In ''Film/{{GoldenEye}}'', the villains have several opportunities to just shoot Bond and don't. Then Ouroumov has the chance to shoot Bond, ''announces that he is about to do it'', and then is promptly cold-cocked. What moves this into beyond-belief territory is that ''both'' have direct evidence of how dangerous he is when cornered. The only such opportunity that has a justified reason for not killing him is in the Statue yard, where Trevelyan is trying to frame Bond and Natalya for the theft of the helicopter. If a post-explosion examination of the bodies revealed that they had been shot beforehand, it would have raised suspicion. Also, given Trevelyan's motivations, it's not merely enough to kill Bond, and if it would be he usually has more pragmatic reasons for keeping them alive. The aforementioned frame-up is just the first such example.
** Elliot Carver was preparing to do this in ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies'', leaving Mr. Stamper and his henchmen to torture Bond and Wai Lin for an ungodly amount of hours, but the heroes decide to make their escape before Carver even leaves the room.
** Zig-zagged by Elektra King in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough''. For most of the film, she averts the trope in that her aim is to seduce Bond into becoming her new Renard, rather than to kill him. When she ''does'' decide to kill Bond, however, she straps him to a torture chair that will slowly apply pressure to the back of his neck until it snaps. She is, admittedly, about five seconds away from succeeding when [[BigDamnHeroes Zukozsky intervenes]], but she ''would'' have succeeded if she hadn't stopped to gloat between each turn of the screw. What truly moves this into "stupidity" territory is that [[spoiler:when Zukovsky arrives, she pulls out a gun and shoots him, then instead of shooting Bond too, she '''''drops the gun in front of him and runs away''''', in the delusional belief that he [[WouldntHitAGirl wouldn't shoot a previous lover]]. Even after she tried to kill him not ten seconds ago.]] This ends about as well for Elektra as you'd expect.
** It's either {{lampshade|Hanging}}d or a spectacularly bad example, albeit not involving Bond himself: In ''Film/DieAnotherDay'', two henchmen have Jinx at their mercy, and one ''actually proposes shooting her''... but the other one wants to do it with lasers, and gets his way, allowing Bond time to arrive and rescue her. Earlier in the film, Bond gets out a Bullet-Proof Vest and Colonel Moon keeps shooting it until it falls off into the ground.
** In ''Film/{{Casino Royale|2006}}'' Mr. White makes a dumb and wholly unnecessary deal to keep Bond alive. It ends poorly for him in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''.
** Not quite averted in ''Film/QuantumOfSolace'', as while the villains never really have Bond at their mercy the way they usually do at least once a movie, they do, however, leave the oft-imperiled Bond girl alive way too many times, and she ends up having as much to do with their downfall as 007 does.
** Raoul Silva in ''Film/{{Skyfall}}'' initially toys with Bond instead of killing him because it's all part of his plan to get caught so he can exact revenge on M. Later, however, his failure to take advantage of various opportunities to kill the heroes after said plan has already run its course is best chalked up to PlotArmor and SanityHasAdvantages.
** Crops up several times in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''. BigBad Oberhauser's [[EvilIsPetty petty desire]] to sadistically torment Bond and relish in his suffering instead of killing him on the spot [[spoiler:due to their CainAndAbel relationship]] ends up becoming his FatalFlaw in the movie.
*** First, when he has Bond at his mercy in his secret base, he just decided to go all EvilGloating and BreakTheBadass on both Bond and the BondGirl, and then he'd get to killing Bond after the ColdBloodedTorture instead of instantaneously killing 007. This gives 007 ample time to bail out and conjure a plan to take down Oberhauser and [[spoiler:C]].
*** The second time, he constructs an elaborate DeathTrap, giving Bond a SadisticChoice: escape now on your own but live with the guilt of not saving [[spoiler:Madeleine Swann]] in time for the rest of your life, or try to rescue [[spoiler:Swann]] and die together. [[spoiler:Bond TakesAThirdOption, and he not only manages to save Swann in the nick of time, he also gives chase to Blofeld and has him arrested for his crimes.]] In this case, Oberhauser was playing on Bond's feelings to get him to fall, but since he was more interested in tormenting Bond rather than killing him, this gave Bond plenty of time to find [[spoiler:Swann]] and then escape.
*** Oberhauser's henchmen aren't too bright either. When they kidnap Bond, they tie his hands in front of him, with plastic zip ties. Sure enough, Bond is able to grab one of their guns and shoot them both, then break free.
*** [[spoiler:[[EvilAllAlong C/Max Denbigh]]]] himself is guilty of this, as he had many chances to kill M so he [[spoiler:won't hinder his EvilPlan to seize control of the world's intelligence agencies and forward the collected intel to SPECTRE, but opts to go for BreakThemByTalking near the climax. He also failed to realize that M managed to do a sweep of his office and empty his gun before C gets there, being that M is a former field agent unlike C, who's more of a corrupt paper-shuffler and ObstructiveBureaucrat. He finally tries to kill M, but M manages to grab C's gun and send him down a DisneyVillainDeath.]]
** [[http://www.empireonline.com/features/bond-villain-monologues/ Empire]] listed the [[EvilGloating Bond Villain Monologues]], while stating on all "[[StatingTheSimpleSolution What he should have done]]: [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim Shot Him]]", save ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''. There, the villain should have "Bought Website/{{Google}}." To be fair, General Whittaker in ''Film/TheLivingDaylights'' only monologued to distract Bond as a remote control gun was aiming to shoot him.
[[/folder]]



* This is a recurring FatalFlaw for many of the ''Film/JamesBond'' (the {{Trope Namer|s}}) villains, as they tend to [[EvilGloating gloat]] about their {{Evil Plan}}s, but by then, 007 has already cooked up a plan B to escape and defeat the baddies. Examples in chronological order:
** ''Film/DrNo'':
*** After a dinner goes wrong, Dr. No orders his guards to beat Bond up and imprison him. 007 naturally escapes. Arguably justified in that this was the first Bond film, so nobody know how dangerous he could be.
*** In [[Literature/DrNo the book]], he also had Bond run through Dr. No's death course. Bond was close to dying through it, multiple times. As did everyone else Dr. No had "tested"; the course was designed to kill. The only difference Dr. No ever expected was how long it would take. Funny how much difference a stolen lighter and a steak knife (and Bond!) can make...
** In ''Film/FromRussiaWithLove'', Red Grant's plan is to [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim just shoot Bond]], and he actually manages to get the drop on his target and have him completely at his mercy, but he still fails because he can't resist indulging in some EvilGloating and a JustBetweenYouAndMe speech. In Red's defense, he still would have been fine if he hadn't fallen for Bond's bribe. At least he didn't leave the guy unattended, unlike most of the jokers on this list.
*** He'd also had plenty of opportunities to kill Bond before he even got on the train, but his failure to do so was his superior's fault: Red's boss' boss (Blofeld in the movie, General G in the novel) didn't just want Bond to die, he wanted him to die in a manner that would embarrass [=MI6=] and the British government, which required a more elaborate setup then just shooting him as he walked down the street.
** Averted ''and'' played straight by ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''. Audric Goldfinger was originally going to just have Bond sliced in half by a laser, but moments from loosing his manhood Bond himself points out that if he dies, then the [[UsefulNotes/SecretIntelligenceService Secret Service]] will just send in [[HeroOfAnotherStory some guy called 008]]. Goldfinger decides instead to keep Bond alive and trick his superiors into thinking Bond has the situation well in hand. This works, and Goldfinger's plan probably would have succeeded if Bond hadn't used the opportunity to [[HighHeelFaceTurn charm]] Pussy Galore.
*** In the same film, however, Goldfinger plays the trope straight in dealing with his gangster accomplices. While he is showing them his plan with an elaborate miniature Fort Knox, one gangster demands to leave and take his gold with him. They load the gold in a car and Oddjob drives him away, ostensibly to the airport. Oddjob kills him as soon as the gangster notices they aren't heading to the airport. Instead of just dumping the body, however he takes the car, with the body in it, to an auto yard where it is cubed. He then returns to the farm where Goldfinger says they will have to extract the gold from the car. The kicker is that, after that gangster left, Goldfinger had the room sealed and all the other gangsters gassed to death anyway. So why not just excuse himself for a minute, leaving that one guy with the others and kill them all at once as he had already planned to do, instead of destroying a car for no reason (and even then, why not just take the gold out of the car ''before'' making it a three foot by three foot cube, rather than ''after'')?
*** Notably, in the novel, the gangster who opted out of the plan "fell down the stairs" on his way out of the meeting, and the others all agreed to join the plan and were left alive, rather than the elaborate setup from the movie.
** ''Film/{{Thunderball}}'':
*** Fiona Volpe successfully seduces Bond - not that that's especially difficult to do - and doesn't do a HighHeelFaceTurn, but then monologues about it and generally screws around until Bond escapes, killing her shortly thereafter. Helga Brandt makes almost the exact same mistake a film later, though she's instead killed by her superior for being a moron.
*** BigBad Largo himself provides a classic example. He catches Bond in his pool fighting with one of his men. The mook with him is just about to shoot Bond, but Largo stops him and instead traps Bond in there to be eaten by his sharks. Naturally, Bond uses this to escape.
** In ''Film/YouOnlyLiveTwice'', Blofeld's guilty of it at least twice; first, he sends an assassin to kill Bond with an elaborate poison trick while he sleeps… you know, instead of shooting him or dropping a grenade on him or any of the myriad other ways to kill a sleeping guy from roughly the same distance. Later, he catches Bond in his base, and keeps him alive because he wants Bond to witness his success even though he really ought to know better than that by now. He even pulls an elaborate fakeout where [[BlofeldPloy he seems like he's about to shoot Bond, but shoots his own henchman instead at the last second]]. A little while after that, he finally tries to shoot Bond for real, but of course by then it's too late.
** Justified in ''Film/OnHerMajestysSecretService'', where for once Blofeld actually has a sensible reason for keeping the captured 007 alive and explaining the plot to him: Bond as a government agent would be an external witness to his activities to verify his claims that he can actually release a "Virus Omega" and is not merely bluffing.
** In ''Film/DiamondsAreForever'', [[ThoseTwoBadGuys Mr. Wint and Mr. Kidd]] had Bond unconscious and they simply dumped him in an unfinished pipeline and left, [[SealedRoomInTheMiddleOfNowhere assuming he'd eventually die]]. Doubly stupid, as this was the ''second time'' the pair had been given an unconscious James Bond to dispose of; the first time they tried to burn him alive, which admittedly would have worked as he was only saved by other villains.
** Most of ''Film/LiveAndLetDie'' revolves around this, as the villains sequentially attempt an elaborate assassination involving a snake (despite having keys to his room), leave him unattended on a small island to be eaten by alligators, and finally try to have him fed to sharks - admittedly a classic - instead of just shooting him, despite by then having had enough experience with the guy to know better.
** ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'':
*** Bond takes up Hai Fat's invitation to join him for dinner in his mansion while pretending to be Scaramanga, not knowing that the ''real'' Scaramanga had already gotten in touch with the guy. When he arrives there late at night, he's incapacitated by some guards in an ambush. As they're about to kill him, Hai Fat forbids them from doing so because he doesn't want Bond killed in his home. They'll just take him somewhere else to finish him off, right? Nope. Hai Fat has Bond placed in a krabi krabong school to... get beaten up? Maybe?
*** Justifiably invoked by Scaramanga late in the film; he freely admits that he could have used his solar-powered laser to blow up Bond's plane before he even landed on the island, but chose not to do so because of how unsatisfying it would be. Scaramanga would like nothing better than to engage in a fair DuelToTheDeath with 007 himself.
** ''Film/ForYourEyesOnly'':
*** In TheTeaser, [[LawyerFriendlyCameo "Blofeld"]] opts to toy with Bond in the helicopter, instead of just crashing it as soon as he takes control. Justified in this case by the fact that "Blofeld" had looked forward to killing Bond for a long time and had been crippled by him - he wanted Bond to suffer.
*** The main villain is guilty of it as well, choosing to kill Bond and the Bond Girl by dragging them behind his boat and assuming sharks ate them when they finally disappeared as opposed to shooting them ''before'' throwing them overboard and then using the sharks to dispose of the evidence.
** ''Film/AViewToAKill'':
*** Early on, Zorin decides to kill Bond by rolling his car into a lake, presumably to MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. [[DownplayedTrope Downplayed]], though, as Zorin does try to get it done while James is still unconscious and even stays at the lake long enough to make sure James couldn't have survived (James ''does'' survive by spotting that Zorin was watching and using the air from the tire to stay underwater until Zorin left).
*** Later, Zorin has Bond at his mercy but decides to kill him by locking him in a museum and setting it on fire. Justified, however, in that he wants to frame Bond for the murder of someone else and make it look like he failed to escape after setting the museum on fire himself.
** Averted in ''Film/TheLivingDaylights'' as the villain's whole plan hinges on Bond killing someone on his say so and his own ability to look like the victim and/or hero. He does miss a good opportunity to kill Bond late in the film, but it's because he thinks sending Bond to jail will be better for his cover - which he'd be right about, if Bond hadn't already outsmarted him a few scenes before.
** Almost averted again in ''Film/LicenceToKill'' as the villain doesn't find out Bond's not on his side 'till very near the end, and when he does put Bond into his death trap he sticks around to watch until he's forced to leave because the place is on fire and about to explode, at which point he leaves his number two man in charge of finishing the job. Naturally, that goes poorly for him, but credit to Sanchez for getting so much closer to getting it right than most.
** In ''Film/{{GoldenEye}}'', the villains have several opportunities to just shoot Bond and don't. Then Ouroumov has the chance to shoot Bond, ''announces that he is about to do it'', and then is promptly cold-cocked. What moves this into beyond-belief territory is that ''both'' have direct evidence of how dangerous he is when cornered. The only such opportunity that has a justified reason for not killing him is in the Statue yard, where Trevelyan is trying to frame Bond and Natalya for the theft of the helicopter. If a post-explosion examination of the bodies revealed that they had been shot beforehand, it would have raised suspicion. Also, given Trevelyan's motivations, it's not merely enough to kill Bond, and if it would be he usually has more pragmatic reasons for keeping them alive. The aforementioned frame-up is just the first such example.
** Elliot Carver was preparing to do this in ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies'', leaving Mr. Stamper and his henchmen to torture Bond and Wai Lin for an ungodly amount of hours, but the heroes decide to make their escape before Carver even leaves the room.
** Zig-zagged by Elektra King in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough''. For most of the film, she averts the trope in that her aim is to seduce Bond into becoming her new Renard, rather than to kill him. When she ''does'' decide to kill Bond, however, she straps him to a torture chair that will slowly apply pressure to the back of his neck until it snaps. She is, admittedly, about five seconds away from succeeding when [[BigDamnHeroes Zukozsky intervenes]], but she ''would'' have succeeded if she hadn't stopped to gloat between each turn of the screw. What truly moves this into "stupidity" territory is that [[spoiler:when Zukovsky arrives, she pulls out a gun and shoots him, then instead of shooting Bond too, she '''''drops the gun in front of him and runs away''''', in the delusional belief that he [[WouldntHitAGirl wouldn't shoot a previous lover]]. Even after she tried to kill him not ten seconds ago.]] This ends about as well for Elektra as you'd expect.
** It's either {{lampshade|Hanging}}d or a spectacularly bad example, albeit not involving Bond himself: In ''Film/DieAnotherDay'', two henchmen have Jinx at their mercy, and one ''actually proposes shooting her''... but the other one wants to do it with lasers, and gets his way, allowing Bond time to arrive and rescue her. Earlier in the film, Bond gets out a Bullet-Proof Vest and Colonel Moon keeps shooting it until it falls off into the ground.
** In ''Film/{{Casino Royale|2006}}'' Mr. White makes a dumb and wholly unnecessary deal to keep Bond alive. It ends poorly for him in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''.
** Not quite averted in ''Film/QuantumOfSolace'', as while the villains never really have Bond at their mercy the way they usually do at least once a movie, they do, however, leave the oft-imperiled Bond girl alive way too many times, and she ends up having as much to do with their downfall as 007 does.
** Raoul Silva in ''Film/{{Skyfall}}'' initially toys with Bond instead of killing him because it's all part of his plan to get caught so he can exact revenge on M. Later, however, his failure to take advantage of various opportunities to kill the heroes after said plan has already run its course is best chalked up to PlotArmor and SanityHasAdvantages.
** Crops up several times in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''. BigBad Oberhauser's [[EvilIsPetty petty desire]] to sadistically torment Bond and relish in his suffering instead of killing him on the spot [[spoiler:due to their CainAndAbel relationship]] ends up becoming his FatalFlaw in the movie.
*** First, when he has Bond at his mercy in his secret base, he just decided to go all EvilGloating and BreakTheBadass on both Bond and the BondGirl, and then he'd get to killing Bond after the ColdBloodedTorture instead of instantaneously killing 007. This gives 007 ample time to bail out and conjure a plan to take down Oberhauser and [[spoiler:C]].
*** The second time, he constructs an elaborate DeathTrap, giving Bond a SadisticChoice: escape now on your own but live with the guilt of not saving [[spoiler:Madeleine Swann]] in time for the rest of your life, or try to rescue [[spoiler:Swann]] and die together. [[spoiler:Bond TakesAThirdOption, and he not only manages to save Swann in the nick of time, he also gives chase to Blofeld and has him arrested for his crimes.]] In this case, Oberhauser was playing on Bond's feelings to get him to fall, but since he was more interested in tormenting Bond rather than killing him, this gave Bond plenty of time to find [[spoiler:Swann]] and then escape.
*** Oberhauser's henchmen aren't too bright either. When they kidnap Bond, they tie his hands in front of him, with plastic zip ties. Sure enough, Bond is able to grab one of their guns and shoot them both, then break free.
*** [[spoiler:[[EvilAllAlong C/Max Denbigh]]]] himself is guilty of this, as he had many chances to kill M so he [[spoiler:won't hinder his EvilPlan to seize control of the world's intelligence agencies and forward the collected intel to SPECTRE, but opts to go for BreakThemByTalking near the climax. He also failed to realize that M managed to do a sweep of his office and empty his gun before C gets there, being that M is a former field agent unlike C, who's more of a corrupt paper-shuffler and ObstructiveBureaucrat. He finally tries to kill M, but M manages to grab C's gun and send him down a DisneyVillainDeath.]]
** [[http://www.empireonline.com/features/bond-villain-monologues/ Empire]] listed the [[EvilGloating Bond Villain Monologues]], while stating on all "[[StatingTheSimpleSolution What he should have done]]: [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim Shot Him]]", save ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''. There, the villain should have "Bought Website/{{Google}}." To be fair, General Whittaker in ''Film/TheLivingDaylights'' only monologued to distract Bond as a remote control gun was aiming to shoot him.

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