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[[TropesAreNotBad Not necessarily a bad thing]]: the entire process of filmmaking is rarely the point, so a bit of ArtisticLicense, so that the viewers have an easier time understanding it, or to prevent a subplot from dominating the movie can be a wise choice.

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[[TropesAreNotBad [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools Not necessarily a bad thing]]: the entire process of filmmaking is rarely the point, so a bit of ArtisticLicense, so that the viewers have an easier time understanding it, or to prevent a subplot from dominating the movie can be a wise choice.


* The opening scene of ''Film/MrsDoubtfire'' features Daniel recording for a cartoon. For the most part in the West voice recording for animation is done before the actual animating (Japan, however, animates, then records). Creator/ChrisColumbus DID acknowledge this in his commentary and figured it could be taken as Daniel dubbing a foreign cartoon. However, this doesn't make sense either as the lip-synch in the cartoon (produced by Creator/ChuckJones) is clearly English. Daniel is more than likely just doing post-production looping, either to just do touch ups on certain lines or maybe [[TheOtherMarty Daniel replaced another actor]] and is recording over the previous actor's work. Which makes sense from his conversation with the producer who complains that this session is already costing the studio and they're on a deadline. Also, you don't typically have a censor board overseeing the actual dubbing/recording of a cartoon...that would waste far too much of their time. (Maybe they were just there to hotbox inside the booth?)

to:

* The opening scene of ''Film/MrsDoubtfire'' features Daniel recording for a cartoon. For the most part in the West voice recording for animation is done before the actual animating (Japan, however, animates, then records). Creator/ChrisColumbus DID acknowledge this in his commentary and figured it could be taken as Daniel dubbing a foreign cartoon. However, this doesn't make sense either as the lip-synch in the cartoon (produced by Creator/ChuckJones) is clearly English. Daniel is more than likely just doing post-production looping, either to just do touch ups on certain lines or maybe [[TheOtherMarty Daniel replaced another actor]] and is recording over the previous actor's work. Which makes sense from his conversation with the producer who complains that this session is already costing the studio and they're on a deadline. Also, you don't typically have a censor board overseeing the actual dubbing/recording of a cartoon...that would waste far too much of their time. (Maybe they were just there to hotbox inside the booth?)



* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones. It's possible the sensors were left off the suit out of the real life concern that they might interfere with the CGI being used in their scenes.]]

to:

* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", fights," but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones. It's possible the sensors were left off the suit out of the real life concern that they might interfere with the CGI being used in their scenes.]]scenes]].



* Averted in one story by Creator/EphraimKishon where he demonstrates how different real filmmaking is from this trope: Production runs up costs even if nothing happens on set, continuity is SeriousBusiness, and a simple scene may need twenty shots until it's right. Add a PrimaDonnaDirector... let's just say, it's not fun for the poor guy who ended up as an extra (even worse: unwillingly), having to play the role of the random guy who cries "Oy!" when the star steps on his foot.
* Tyler Durden in ''Literature/FightClub'' is a part-time projectionist who likes to prank audiences by inserting single frames of pornography into children's films. The narrator explains that the pornographic frames are so brief that the audience doesn't consciously notice them, asking the reader to "divide a second into sixty equal parts" to illustrate the brevity. In fact, the industry standard framerate in films is 24 frames-per-second, rather than 60, so the pornographic frame would appear onscreen for 1/24th of a second. This could potentially be chalked up to the narrator's own ignorance, except that [[spoiler:Tyler is the narrator's split personality and would be expected to have an understanding of framerates.]]

to:

* Averted in one story by Creator/EphraimKishon where he demonstrates how different real filmmaking is from this trope: Production runs up costs even if nothing happens on set, continuity is SeriousBusiness, and a simple scene may need twenty shots until it's right. Add a PrimaDonnaDirector... let's just say, it's not fun for the poor guy who ended up as an extra (even worse: unwillingly), having to play the role of the random guy who cries "Oy!" when the star steps on his foot.
* Tyler Durden in ''Literature/FightClub'' is a part-time projectionist who likes to prank audiences by inserting single frames of pornography into children's films. The narrator explains that the pornographic frames are so brief that the audience doesn't consciously notice them, asking the reader to "divide a second into sixty equal parts" to illustrate the brevity. In fact, the industry standard framerate in films is 24 frames-per-second, frames per second, rather than 60, so the pornographic frame would appear onscreen for 1/24th of a second. This could potentially be chalked up to the narrator's own ignorance, except that [[spoiler:Tyler is the narrator's split personality and would be expected to have an understanding of framerates.]]


* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones. (It's possible the sensors were left off the suit out of the real life concern that they might interfere with the CGI being used in their scenes.)]]

to:

* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones. (It's It's possible the sensors were left off the suit out of the real life concern that they might interfere with the CGI being used in their scenes.)]]]]


* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones.]]

to:

* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones.]] (It's possible the sensors were left off the suit out of the real life concern that they might interfere with the CGI being used in their scenes.)]]

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* ''Film/SpiderManFarFromHome'': Quentin Beck a.k.a. Mysterio [[spoiler:wears a motion-capture suit that maps his movements onto his artificial projection of himself during his faked "superhero fights", but it's just the underlayer (and a custom bubble helmet) without [[https://d1u6g1e1nisfhs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/articles-what-is-motion-capture-w.jpg the sensor dots and face camera rig]] of real ones.]]


* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.

to:

* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, out since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.



* Francois Truffaut's ''Film/DayForNight'' is basically a response to this trope. While it does show things like multiple takes (from different angles to keep it interesting) and the difficulties of making films, it goes a bit dramatic with worst case scenarios, including [[spoiler:actor death]].

to:

* Francois Truffaut's ''Film/DayForNight'' is basically a response to this trope. While it does show things like multiple takes (from different angles to keep it interesting) and the difficulties of making films, it goes a bit dramatic with worst case worst-case scenarios, including [[spoiler:actor death]].



* The opening scene of ''Film/MrsDoubtfire'' features Daniel recording for a cartoon. For the most part in the West voice recording for animation is done before the actual animating (Japan, however, animates, then records). Creator/ChrisColumbus DID acknowledge this in his commentary and figured it could be taken as Daniel dubbing a foreign cartoon. However, this doesn't make sense either as the lip-synch in the cartoon (produced by Creator/ChuckJones) is clearly English. Daniel is more than likely just doing post-production looping, either to just do touch ups on certain lines, or maybe [[TheOtherMarty Daniel replaced another actor,]] and is recording over the previous actor's work. Which makes sense from his conversation with the producer who complains that this session is already costing the studio and they're on a deadline. Also, you don't typically have a censor board overseeing the actual dubbing/recording of a cartoon... that would waste far too much of their time. (Maybe they were just there to hotbox inside the booth?)

to:

* The opening scene of ''Film/MrsDoubtfire'' features Daniel recording for a cartoon. For the most part in the West voice recording for animation is done before the actual animating (Japan, however, animates, then records). Creator/ChrisColumbus DID acknowledge this in his commentary and figured it could be taken as Daniel dubbing a foreign cartoon. However, this doesn't make sense either as the lip-synch in the cartoon (produced by Creator/ChuckJones) is clearly English. Daniel is more than likely just doing post-production looping, either to just do touch ups on certain lines, lines or maybe [[TheOtherMarty Daniel replaced another actor,]] actor]] and is recording over the previous actor's work. Which makes sense from his conversation with the producer who complains that this session is already costing the studio and they're on a deadline. Also, you don't typically have a censor board overseeing the actual dubbing/recording of a cartoon... that would waste far too much of their time. (Maybe they were just there to hotbox inside the booth?)



* Averted in one story by Creator/EphraimKishon where he demonstrates how different real filmmaking is from this trope: Production runs up costs even if nothing happens on set, continuity is SeriousBusiness, and a simple scene may need twenty shots until it's right. Add a PrimadonnaDirector... let's just say, it's not fun for the poor guy who ended up as an extra (even worse: unwillingly), having to play the role of the random guy who cries "Oy!" when the star steps on his foot.
* Tyler Durden in ''Literature/FightClub'' is a part-time projectionist who likes to prank audiences by inserting single frames of pornography into children's films. The narrator explains that the pornographic frames are so brief that the audience doesn't consciously notice them, asking the reader to "divide a second into sixty equal parts" to illustrate the brevity. In fact, the industry standard framerate in films is 24 frames-per-second, rather than 60, so the pornographic frame would appear onscreen for 1/24th of a second. This could potentially be chalked up to the narrator's own ignorance, except that [[spoiler:Tyler is the narrator's split personality, and would be expected to have an understanding of framerates.]]

to:

* Averted in one story by Creator/EphraimKishon where he demonstrates how different real filmmaking is from this trope: Production runs up costs even if nothing happens on set, continuity is SeriousBusiness, and a simple scene may need twenty shots until it's right. Add a PrimadonnaDirector...PrimaDonnaDirector... let's just say, it's not fun for the poor guy who ended up as an extra (even worse: unwillingly), having to play the role of the random guy who cries "Oy!" when the star steps on his foot.
* Tyler Durden in ''Literature/FightClub'' is a part-time projectionist who likes to prank audiences by inserting single frames of pornography into children's films. The narrator explains that the pornographic frames are so brief that the audience doesn't consciously notice them, asking the reader to "divide a second into sixty equal parts" to illustrate the brevity. In fact, the industry standard framerate in films is 24 frames-per-second, rather than 60, so the pornographic frame would appear onscreen for 1/24th of a second. This could potentially be chalked up to the narrator's own ignorance, except that [[spoiler:Tyler is the narrator's split personality, personality and would be expected to have an understanding of framerates.]]



* ''Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy'' plays with the trope when Kendrix must fill in for an [[IdenticalStranger injured actress]]. The film is a romance and the scenes we see being shot appear to be in chronological order. The last scene filmed is the ending and they're apparently using just the one shot since the only re-takes they have to do are down to Kendrix forgetting her lines. Of course it's not too glaring since it is established that 90% of the movie has already been shot.

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* ''Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy'' plays with the trope when Kendrix must fill in for an [[IdenticalStranger injured actress]]. The film is a romance and the scenes we see being shot appear to be in chronological order. The last scene filmed is the ending and they're apparently using just the one shot since the only re-takes they have to do are down to Kendrix forgetting her lines. Of course course, it's not too glaring since it is established that 90% of the movie has already been shot.



* ''Series/ComicBookMen'' featured shooting a commercial one episode, it all seemed genuine until the very end when the cast members gathered outside the store and delivered a line to conclude the commercial. This required several takes and the last one where they got everything perfect an old lady on the street walked into the shot. This of course ruined the shot, even though they could have easily used the audio over one of the other takes during editing.

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* ''Series/ComicBookMen'' featured shooting a commercial one episode, it all seemed genuine until the very end when the cast members gathered outside the store and delivered a line to conclude the commercial. This required several takes and the last one where they got everything perfect an old lady on the street walked into the shot. This This, of course course, ruined the shot, even though they could have easily used the audio over one of the other takes during editing.



* In ''ComicStrip/SpiderMan'', MJ was to star in an action flick. One scene involved a brawl in an elevator. Only the two actors were anywhere near the elevator. Apparently there were no microphones, no lines, no choreography, and two unmanned or remote-controlled cameras. Small wonder that it [[GoneHorriblyWrong went horribly wrong]].

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* In ''ComicStrip/SpiderMan'', MJ was to star in an action flick. One scene involved a brawl in an elevator. Only the two actors were anywhere near the elevator. Apparently Apparently, there were no microphones, no lines, no choreography, and two unmanned or remote-controlled cameras. Small wonder that it [[GoneHorriblyWrong went horribly wrong]].



* The Franchise/IndianaJones Stunt Show at Disney Hollywood Studios suffers from this, but since it's more about watching cool stunts than getting an accurate portrayal of a film set, it's somewhat forgiveable.

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* The Franchise/IndianaJones Stunt Show at Disney Hollywood Studios suffers from this, but since it's more about watching cool stunts than getting an accurate portrayal of a film set, it's somewhat forgiveable.forgivable.



*** In the final segment, the audience is directed to view TV's in the arena, which play out the completed production in movie's intended order (Crew going about their duties. Third actor sees enemy planes. Enemy planes fly in and open fire on the ship. Crew reacts and scrambles. Third actor makes a phone call. Fourth actor picks up the phone, answers the third actor, and then begins working the ship consols, planes come about and release torpedos. The ship is torpedoed. Actors 1-3 react to the explosion. Actor 4 is hit by a deluge from the impact. Planes fly off.). To further stress the out of order filming, the director indicates that he filmed the actors in the planes some time ago and that what was shot today was the final shoot for the film and they can call it a wrap.

to:

*** In the final segment, the audience is directed to view TV's in the arena, which play out the completed production in the movie's intended order (Crew going about their duties. Third The third actor sees enemy planes. Enemy planes fly in and open fire on the ship. Crew The crew reacts and scrambles. Third The third actor makes a phone call. Fourth The fourth actor picks up the phone, answers the third actor, and then begins working the ship consols, planes come about and release torpedos. The ship is torpedoed. Actors 1-3 react to the explosion. Actor 4 is hit by a deluge from the impact. Planes fly off.). To further stress the out of order filming, the director indicates that he filmed the actors in the planes some time ago and that what was shot today was the final shoot for the film and they can call it a wrap.



* A security camera example: In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode "The Blunder Years" we see thirty year old security footage, complete with sound and in color, and it's filmed from different angles. It looks more like a {{Retraux}} television show.

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* A security camera example: In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode "The Blunder Years" we see thirty year old thirty-year-old security footage, complete with sound and in color, and it's filmed from different angles. It looks more like a {{Retraux}} television show.



* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' has Jackie inadverently walk into a set and fight a WireFu actor he mistakes for an enemy. The set is housed in a seemingly ordinary alleyway with the cameras hidden behind disguised walls, when in real life sets on public locations are highly visible precisely to keep random civilians from wandering onto them.
* In 'The Real Ghostbusters', the team visit the set of the 1984 movie and see the famous firehouse on a sound stage. In fact this firehouse was actually two real firehouses, one in NYC for the exterior and another in LA for the interior.

to:

* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' has Jackie inadverently inadvertently walk into a set and fight a WireFu actor he mistakes for an enemy. The set is housed in a seemingly ordinary alleyway with the cameras hidden behind disguised walls, walls when in real life sets on public locations are highly visible precisely to keep random civilians from wandering onto them.
* In 'The Real Ghostbusters', the team visit the set of the 1984 movie and see the famous firehouse on a sound stage. In fact fact, this firehouse was actually two real firehouses, one in NYC for the exterior and another in LA for the interior.


* ''Film/CharliesAngels'' has Matt [=LeBlanc=]'s character acting in a movie - the inaccurate portrayal, in this example, was a device to show that [[TwistEnding it wasn't reality]]. This is similar to the ''Film/MortalKombat'' example above.

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* ''Film/CharliesAngels'' has Matt [=LeBlanc=]'s character acting in a movie - the inaccurate portrayal, in this example, was a device to show that [[TwistEnding it wasn't reality]]. This is similar to the ''Film/MortalKombat'' ''Film/MortalKombatTheMovie'' example above.


* Johnny Cage's introduction scene in ''Film/MortalKombat''. They shoot an entire fight scene (until a last-move screw-up) in one take.

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* Johnny Cage's introduction scene in ''Film/MortalKombat''.''Film/MortalKombatTheMovie''. They shoot an entire fight scene (until a last-move screw-up) in one take.


* "But the camera couldn't have got that shot!": Maybe there's a few angles in the final shot which the cameras we see couldn't have got. But it'd be annoying to the viewer to show the alternate angles being filmed in separate takes.

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* "But the camera couldn't have got gotten that shot!": Maybe there's a few angles in the final shot which the cameras we see couldn't have got. But it'd be annoying to the viewer to show the alternate angles being filmed in separate takes.


* Anime/{{Pokemon}}:
** There is an episode in the early Kanto series where the heroes participate in a movie. The director then proceeds to shoot the last scene of the movie, saying "I always shoot the last scene first, so I know how the movie ends". From the way he says it, this is implied to be a silly, comical quirk of his.
** Averted in Best Wishes with Luke and his movies, as their production is presented in a fairly accurate method; with the Pokéwood episode showing the necessity to shoot scenes out of order, then edit them into the correct order in post-production.

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* Anime/{{Pokemon}}:
** There is an episode in in[[Anime/{{Pokemon}} the early Kanto series series]] where the heroes participate in a movie. The director then proceeds to shoot the last scene of the movie, saying "I always shoot the last scene first, so I know how the movie ends". From the way he says it, this is implied to be a silly, comical quirk of his.
** Averted in Best Wishes ''Best Wishes'' with Luke and his movies, as their production is presented in a fairly accurate method; with the Pokéwood episode showing the necessity to shoot scenes out of order, then edit them into the correct order in post-production.

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'', "[[Recap/DuckTalesS1E4WhereNoDuckHasGoneBefore Where No Duck Has Gone Before]]". No one on seasonal television has contracts that last longer than one season (except in cases where a show is renewed in advance), presumably to avoid situations like Major Courage's at the end of the episode.


* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.



* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.


* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/IncrediblesII'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.

to:

* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/IncrediblesII'' ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.

Added DiffLines:

* A plot point of ''WesternAnimation/IncrediblesII'' involves the superheroes wearing miniature cameras to show their point-of-view during super fights, so that civilians can watch the footage and see the supers doing their best to contain the disaster. The cameras themselves are very efficiently compact and high definition for a [[{{Retraux}} supposedly '50s setting]]. Additionally, it's never addressed whether some of the footage would have to be edited out, since there are parts where Elastigirl discusses secret information relevant to her personal identity, or some of the Screenslaver's hypnotic imagery recorded in the video.


* Joey on ''{{Series/Friends}}'' once failed a script reading because he misread "50 miles" as "so miles". An actual script would have written numbers in dialogue as words so "50 miles" would have been written as "fifty miles".

to:

* Joey on ''{{Series/Friends}}'' once failed a script reading because he misread "50 miles" bucks" as "so miles". bucks". An actual script would have written numbers in dialogue as words so "50 miles" bucks" would have been written as "fifty miles".bucks".

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