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* This happened occasionally in the ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse'' when one GameMaster took over a campaign from another GameMaster and immediately instituted story changes that invalidated previous stories. At one point this got so bad that Jack Butler had to stop in, stop multiple campaigns, and reboot the entire universe.
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* ''Series/{{Community}}'' does this a bunch of times. The reasons for which all center on the removal of the original creator - Dan Harmon - in the fourth season. When Harmon later picked up the show again you could say he was not too pleased with many of the decisions made in the fourth season
** This is made clear in season six, not very subtly - when Chang 'farts during the fourth one'. Explaining it as an inside joke.
* When ''Series/{{Dallas}}'' pulled its infamous AllJustADream plot with Bobby Ewing stepping out of the shower, the producers of the show's SpinOff ''Series/KnotsLanding'' were hacked off as they had already based a number of plot developments on Bobby's death (Gary mourning his brother's death, Gary's ex-wife Valene naming one of her twins after her deceased brother-in-law). In the end Bobby Ewing remained dead on Knots Landing and the show [[AlternateTimeline essentially parted ways]] with its parent. Think of a GeckoEnding, but in the middle.

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* ''Series/{{Community}}'' does this a bunch of times. The reasons for which all center on the removal of the original creator - -- Dan Harmon - -- in the fourth season. When Harmon later picked up the show again you could say he was not too pleased with many of the decisions made in the fourth season
** This is made clear in season six, not very subtly - -- when Chang 'farts during the fourth one'. Explaining it It's explained as an inside joke.
* When ''Series/{{Dallas}}'' pulled its infamous AllJustADream plot with Bobby Ewing stepping out of the shower, the producers of the show's SpinOff ''Series/KnotsLanding'' were hacked off as they had already based a number of plot developments on Bobby's death (Gary mourning his brother's death, Gary's ex-wife Valene naming one of her twins after her deceased brother-in-law). In the end end, Bobby Ewing remained dead on Knots Landing ''Knots Landing'' and the show [[AlternateTimeline essentially parted ways]] with its parent. Think of a GeckoEnding, but in the middle.



** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E2TheEndOfTheWorld the second episode]] reveal that Gallifrey was destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some New Millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics that had started to bog down the Time Lords' portrayal in the Classic Series. Come [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor"]] in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent "Hell Bent"]] two seasons later; Moffat heavily disliked Davies' decision to destroy Gallifrey by then, and many viewers were starting to agree that the whole idea of the Doctor being the LastOfHisKind was getting stretched out to the point of exhaustion. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS38E1E2Spyfall "Spyfall"]]. The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.

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** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel Russell T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E2TheEndOfTheWorld the second episode]] reveal that Gallifrey was destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some New Millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics that had started to bog down the Time Lords' portrayal in the Classic Series. Come [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor"]] in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent "Hell Bent"]] two seasons later; Moffat heavily disliked Davies' decision to destroy Gallifrey by then, and many viewers were starting to agree that the whole idea of the Doctor being the LastOfHisKind was getting stretched out to the point of exhaustion. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS38E1E2Spyfall "Spyfall"]]. The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.



* There has been at least 46 writers for ''{{Series/Smallville}}''. Apparent lack of coordination has made the show seem to have a very split personality, with wildly clashing tones, contradictory characterisation, and horrendous amounts of ContinuitySnarl, and even the writers themselves have engaged in their own ShipToShipCombat or promoting their own favourite characters.

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* There has been were at least 46 writers for ''{{Series/Smallville}}''. Apparent lack of coordination has made the show seem to have a very split personality, with wildly clashing tones, contradictory characterisation, and horrendous amounts of ContinuitySnarl, and even the writers themselves have engaged in their own ShipToShipCombat or promoting promoted their own favourite characters.



* An odd real-world version exists in combat sports when regarding titles. Often, champions will walk away from organizations or be stripped for not defending their titles (due to injury or, some say, ducking competition). Also some champions have lost fights in non-title bouts. This has led many fans of boxing and UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts to create unofficial "linear" champions based on who actually beat who for said title.

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* An odd real-world version exists in combat sports when regarding titles. Often, champions will walk away from organizations or be stripped for not defending their titles (due to injury or, some say, ducking competition). Also some champions have lost fights in non-title bouts. This has led many fans of boxing and UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts to create unofficial "linear" champions champions, based on who actually beat who for said title.



* In ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' Timmy/Tootie shippers have [[Film/AFairlyOddMovieGrowUpTimmyTurner a live action movie which shows them getting together as adults]]. Whether or not the movie is canonical is hotly contested by other FOP fans, who do not like the live action movie for various reasons, including Timmy's status as a 23 year old 5th grader who refuses to grow up. What makes things even more confusing is that the live action movie was created by Butch Hartman and Scott Fellows, both of whom worked on movies where Timmy romanced other girls such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Wishology}}'', yet all other romantic plots are retconned into non-existence by the FOP movie.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' Timmy/Tootie shippers have [[Film/AFairlyOddMovieGrowUpTimmyTurner a live action movie which shows them getting together as adults]]. Whether or not the movie is canonical is hotly contested by other FOP fans, who do not like the live action movie for various reasons, including Timmy's status as a 23 year old 23-year-old 5th grader who refuses to grow up. What makes things even more confusing is that the live action movie was created by Butch Hartman and Scott Fellows, both of whom worked on movies where Timmy romanced other girls such as ''WesternAnimation/{{Wishology}}'', yet all other romantic plots are retconned into non-existence by the FOP movie.

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** The ''DWM'' comic strip was also in continuity with the ''New Adventures'' for much of the 1990s, until they suddenly decided to announce they weren't by [[spoiler: killing Ace]].
** An [[https://lanceparkin.wordpress.com/2013/08/26/eulogy-of-the-daleks/ unpublished epilogue]] to the final Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures novel, ''The Dying Days'' would have had a far-future Doctor, having seen the definite final end of the Daleks, give a eulogy in which he describes how they came back from their past defeats, including "I destroyed their homeworld and they simply claimed the computer records had been doctored". Among the reasons Virgin cut this scene was that they felt it unfair to "unretcon" ''War of the Daleks'' before it was even published.


* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': A minor case. Creator/DaveFiloni deliberately gave Literature/DarthBane a cameo in the final episode to ensure the character (who he was a fan of) would remain canon after Disney announced their plans to de-canonize the original Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': A minor case. Creator/DaveFiloni deliberately gave Literature/DarthBane a cameo in the final episode to ensure the character (who he was a fan of) would remain canon after Disney Lucasfilm announced their plans to de-canonize the original Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse.


** When Philip Hinchliffe was producer, script editor Creator/RobertHolmes kicked at a lot of issues he had with Jon Pertwee's Doctor (like his BoringInvincibleHero tendencies), explained many previously-ignored NecessaryWeasel tropes (like AliensSpeakingEnglish, WalkingDisasterArea and HeroBall) and retconned Time Lord society into a DeadlyDecadentCourt of aging bureaucrats because he disliked the Troughton-era's MarySueTopia concept, which is still a [[FanDislikedExplanation fairly contested point]]. Although he envisioned the Time Lords as a OneGenderRace of men unlike later writers, Holmes was the first to confirm that they could regenerate across gender.
** Speaking of Hinchcliffe, he hated the character of the Master, thinking of him as an ineffectual "[[DastardlyWhiplash music hall villain]]". So in Season 14, he had the Master reimagined as a rotting corpse cheating death by his own willpower (influenced by ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' and the {{Lich}} trope). When Creator/JohnNathanTurner took charge later, the character was promptly [[RevisitingTheRoots changed back]] and made even {{camp}}ier.

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** When Philip Hinchliffe was producer, script editor Creator/RobertHolmes kicked at a lot of issues he had with Jon Pertwee's Doctor (like his BoringInvincibleHero tendencies), how he was an InvincibleHero), explained many previously-ignored NecessaryWeasel tropes (like AliensSpeakingEnglish, WalkingDisasterArea and HeroBall) and retconned Time Lord society into a DeadlyDecadentCourt of aging bureaucrats because he disliked the Troughton-era's MarySueTopia MarySuetopia concept, which is still a [[FanDislikedExplanation fairly contested point]]. Although he envisioned the Time Lords as a OneGenderRace of men unlike later writers, Holmes was the first to confirm that they could regenerate across gender.
** Speaking of Hinchcliffe, he Hinchcliffe hated the character of the Master, thinking of him as an ineffectual "[[DastardlyWhiplash music hall villain]]". So in Season 14, he had the Master reimagined as a rotting corpse cheating death by his own willpower (influenced by ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' and the {{Lich}} trope). When Creator/JohnNathanTurner took charge later, the character was promptly [[RevisitingTheRoots changed back]] and made even {{camp}}ier.


** An earlier example is Creator/AaronAllston's run on ''[[Literature/XWingSeries X-Wing]]'', which retconned the cartoonish, stupid Imperial villains of ''Literature/TheCourtshipOfPrincessLeia'' as skillful Intelligence-trained types who project the stereotype [[ObfuscatingStupidity as an act]] to make their enemies underestimate them. And ''Starfighters of Adumar'' has Wedge break up with the HotScientist who ''built the Death Star'', who he'd hooked up with in the ''Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy'', and fall for an old flame who'd been in a relationship with him for years in the ''Comicbook/XWingSeries''. Basically, Zahn, Stackpole and Allston had a three-way collaboration going to fix the shortcomings they saw in the Anderson/Hambly era of the EU.

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** An earlier example is Creator/AaronAllston's run on ''[[Literature/XWingSeries X-Wing]]'', which retconned the cartoonish, stupid Imperial villains of ''Literature/TheCourtshipOfPrincessLeia'' as skillful Intelligence-trained types who project the stereotype [[ObfuscatingStupidity as an act]] to make their enemies underestimate them. And ''Starfighters of Adumar'' has Wedge break up with the HotScientist who ''built the Death Star'', who he'd hooked up with in the ''Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy'', and fall for an old flame who'd been in a relationship with him for years in the ''Comicbook/XWingSeries''.''Literature/XWingSeries''. Basically, Zahn, Stackpole and Allston had a three-way collaboration going to fix the shortcomings they saw in the Anderson/Hambly era of the EU.


** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E2TheEndOfTheWorld the second episode]] reveal that Gallifrey was destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor"]] in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent "Hell Bent"]] two seasons later; Moffat heavily disliked Davies' decision to destroy Gallifrey by then, and many viewers were starting to agree that the whole idea of the Doctor being the LastOfHisKind was getting stretched out to the point of exhaustion. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS38E1E2Spyfall "Spyfall"]]. The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.

to:

** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E2TheEndOfTheWorld the second episode]] reveal that Gallifrey was destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate New Millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from that had started to bog down the Time Lords' portrayal in the Classic Series. Come [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor"]] in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent "Hell Bent"]] two seasons later; Moffat heavily disliked Davies' decision to destroy Gallifrey by then, and many viewers were starting to agree that the whole idea of the Doctor being the LastOfHisKind was getting stretched out to the point of exhaustion. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS38E1E2Spyfall "Spyfall"]]. The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.


** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having Gallifrey be destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come "The Day of the Doctor" in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in "Hell Bent" two seasons later. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall". The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.

to:

** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E2TheEndOfTheWorld the second episode]] reveal that Gallifrey be was destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor" Doctor"]] in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent "Hell Bent" Bent"]] two seasons later. later; Moffat heavily disliked Davies' decision to destroy Gallifrey by then, and many viewers were starting to agree that the whole idea of the Doctor being the LastOfHisKind was getting stretched out to the point of exhaustion. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall".[[Recap/DoctorWhoS38E1E2Spyfall "Spyfall"]]. The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.


** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having Gallifrey be destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come "The Day of the Doctor" in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in "Hell Bent" two seasons later. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall". The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to bring Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.

to:

** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having Gallifrey be destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come "The Day of the Doctor" in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in "Hell Bent" two seasons later. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall". The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to bring revive Gallifrey yet again to spite Chibnall.


** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having Gallifrey be destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come "The Day of the Doctor" in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in "Hell Bent" two seasons later. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall". The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to bring Gallifrey back again to spite Chibnall.

to:

** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having Gallifrey be destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come "The Day of the Doctor" in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in "Hell Bent" two seasons later. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall". The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to bring Gallifrey back yet again to spite Chibnall.

Added DiffLines:

** The status of Gallifrey in the series has bounded back and forth quite a bit as a result of the three showrunners of the new series having considerable disagreements regarding it. Upon its premiere in 2005, Russel T. Davies set the tone for the new series by having Gallifrey be destroyed off-screen as a result of the Last Great Time War, to provide the Doctor with some new millennium-appropriate {{angst}} and remove the complexities of Gallifreyan society and politics from the Classic Series. Come "The Day of the Doctor" in 2013, and Steven Moffat would reveal that Gallifrey actually ''wasn't'' destroyed, but was instead hidden away in a pocket dimension, with the Doctor even revisiting the planet in "Hell Bent" two seasons later. However, Chris Chibnall would then throw his own middle finger to Moffat's middle finger and have the Master re-destroy Gallifrey off-screen in 2020's "Spyfall". The only question now at this point is how long it'll be before a future showrunner decides to bring Gallifrey back again to spite Chibnall.


->''"The late James F. Bowman was writing a serial tale for a weekly paper in collaboration with a genius whose name has not come down to us. They wrote, not jointly but alternately, Bowman supplying the installment for one week, his friend for the next, and so on, world without end, they hoped. Unfortunately they quarreled, and one Monday morning when Bowman read the paper to prepare himself for his task, he found his work cut out for him in a way to surprise and pain him. His collaborator had [[TorchTheFranchiseAndRun embarked every character of the narrative on a ship and sunk them all in the deepest part of the Atlantic]]."''

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->''"The late James F. Bowman was writing a serial tale for a weekly paper in collaboration with a genius whose name has not come down to us. They wrote, not jointly but alternately, Bowman supplying the installment for one week, his friend for the next, and so on, world without end, they hoped. Unfortunately they quarreled, and one Monday morning when Bowman read the paper to prepare himself for his task, he found his work cut out for him in a way to surprise and pain him. His collaborator had [[TorchTheFranchiseAndRun embarked every character of the narrative on a ship ship]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies and sunk them all in the deepest part of the Atlantic]]."''


* The sequels to ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' had this bad, as each sequel save for the final one seems to ''hate'' the movie that came before it. ''Fievel Goes West'', the LighterAndSofter first sequel, which Creator/DonBluth wasn't involved with, appears to take a few [[TakeThat thinly-veiled jabs at the first movie]], such as Tanya getting tomatoes thrown at her for singing "Somewhere Out There", New York City turning out to be a CrapsackWorld, the Mouskewitzes living in poverty and having failed to achieve UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream, and in general carried itself as if LighterAndSofter equaled better. ''Then'' the third movie came along, with yet another different team of writers. Fievel wasn't out west anymore, but in New York, and the writers decided to throw in a WhamLine about Fievel [[AllJustADream having a dream]] where he moved out west, implying that the second movie is now CanonDiscontinuity. They then proceeded to erase the {{Love Interest|s}} of Tony Toponi from the first film and pair him with their new character, and make a DiscontinuityNod later on where Tiger accidentally barks like a dog (as he had in ''Fievel Goes West'').

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* The sequels to ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' had this bad, as each sequel save for the final one seems to ''hate'' the movie that came before it. ''Fievel Goes West'', the LighterAndSofter first sequel, which Creator/DonBluth wasn't involved with, appears to take a few [[TakeThat thinly-veiled jabs at the first movie]], such as Tanya getting tomatoes thrown at her for singing "Somewhere Out There", New York City turning out to be a CrapsackWorld, the Mouskewitzes living in poverty and having failed to achieve UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream, and in general carried itself as if LighterAndSofter equaled better. ''Then'' the third movie came along, with yet another different team of writers. Fievel wasn't out west anymore, but in New York, and the writers decided to throw in a WhamLine about Fievel [[AllJustADream having a dream]] where he moved out west, implying that the second movie is now CanonDiscontinuity. They then proceeded to erase the {{Love Interest|s}} of Tony Toponi from the first film and pair him with their new character, and make a DiscontinuityNod later on where Tiger accidentally barks like a dog (as he had in ''Fievel Goes West''). And while it's debatable whether or not there was enough time between the films for the writers to really gauge the audience reaction to the third film, it may have been no accident that ''The Mystery of the Night Monster'' backtracks on a lot of the this and chooses instead to be as stand-alone as possible.


* In the ''Literature/LandOfOz'' book series, a series with ''forty'' canonical books and an additional hundreds if unofficial additional books written since the series ended thanks to most of the books now being public domain, this was bound to happen. Creator/LFrankBaum, creator of the series, was no stickler for continuity himself and would change things up on the fly. This left a tough job for Ruth Plumly Thompson, the author commissioned by the publisher to continue the series after Baum's death. She saw fit to give the Scarecrow her own origin story (Baum never explained why he was alive), which a lot of fans didn't like, and introduced many of her own characters, ballooning the cast. After she quit, the longtime illustrator John R. Neill wrote some books for the series, and things got, well, [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs strange]]. The next author, Jack Snow, did a RetCon of Thompson's and Neill's additions to the series and continued it going solely off of Baum's canon (Thompson, reportedly, was actually okay with this, not wanting another author using her characters). The authors after Snow mainly did this as well, while also ignoring Snow's contributions. Modern unofficial Oz books (the ones that at least [[DystopianOz try to follow canon, anyway]]) will either take everything as canon (and have to do mental gymnastics to make the ContinuitySnarl make sense), or just Baum's work.

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* In the ''Literature/LandOfOz'' book series, a series with ''forty'' canonical books and an additional hundreds if of unofficial additional books written since the series ended ended, thanks to most of the books now being public domain, this was bound to happen. Creator/LFrankBaum, creator of the series, was no stickler for continuity himself himself, and would often change things up on the fly. This left a tough job for Ruth Plumly Thompson, the author commissioned by the publisher to continue the series after Baum's death. She saw fit to give the Scarecrow her own origin story (Baum never explained why he was alive), which a lot of fans didn't like, and introduced many of her own characters, ballooning the cast. After she quit, the longtime illustrator John R. Neill wrote some books for the series, and things got, well, [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs strange]]. The next author, Jack Snow, did a RetCon of Thompson's and Neill's additions to the series and continued it going solely off of Baum's canon (Thompson, reportedly, was actually okay with this, not wanting another author using her characters). The authors after Snow mainly did this as well, while also ignoring Snow's contributions. Modern unofficial Oz books (the ones that at least [[DystopianOz try to follow canon, anyway]]) will either take everything as canon (and have to do mental gymnastics to make the ContinuitySnarl make sense), or just Baum's work.


* In the ''Literature/LandofOz'' book series, a series with ''forty'' canonical books and an additional hundreds if unofficial additional books written since the series ended thanks to most of the books now being public domain, this was bound to happen. Creator/LFrankBaum, creator of the series, was no stickler for continuity himself and would change things up on the fly. This left a tough job for Ruth Plumly Thompson, the author comissioned by the publisher to continue the series after Baum's death. She saw fit to give the Scarecrow her own origin story (Baum never explained why he was alive), which a lot of fans didn't like, and introduced many of her own characters, balooning the cast. After she quit, the longtime illustrator John R. Neill wrote some books for the series, and things got, well, [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs strange]]. The next author, Jack Snow, did a RetCon of Thompson's and neill's additions to the series and continued it going solely off of Baum's canon (Thompson, reportedly, was actually okay with this, not wanting another author using her characters). The authors after Snow mainly did this as well, also ignoring Snow's contributions. Modern Oz books (the ones that at least [[DystopianOz try to follow canon, anyway]]) will either take everything as canon, or just Baum's work.

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* In the ''Literature/LandofOz'' ''Literature/LandOfOz'' book series, a series with ''forty'' canonical books and an additional hundreds if unofficial additional books written since the series ended thanks to most of the books now being public domain, this was bound to happen. Creator/LFrankBaum, creator of the series, was no stickler for continuity himself and would change things up on the fly. This left a tough job for Ruth Plumly Thompson, the author comissioned commissioned by the publisher to continue the series after Baum's death. She saw fit to give the Scarecrow her own origin story (Baum never explained why he was alive), which a lot of fans didn't like, and introduced many of her own characters, balooning ballooning the cast. After she quit, the longtime illustrator John R. Neill wrote some books for the series, and things got, well, [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs strange]]. The next author, Jack Snow, did a RetCon of Thompson's and neill's Neill's additions to the series and continued it going solely off of Baum's canon (Thompson, reportedly, was actually okay with this, not wanting another author using her characters). The authors after Snow mainly did this as well, while also ignoring Snow's contributions. Modern unofficial Oz books (the ones that at least [[DystopianOz try to follow canon, anyway]]) will either take everything as canon, canon (and have to do mental gymnastics to make the ContinuitySnarl make sense), or just Baum's work.

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