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* The game ''VideoGame/ImperatorRome'' uses this, starting in 350 AUC, right around the time Rome started to grow in power.

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* The game ''VideoGame/ImperatorRome'' uses this, starting in 350 450 AUC, right around the time Rome started to grow in power.power. This is partly for engine-related issues -- negative years/counting downwards can cause problems in Clausewitz (and it needs to have a single universal time, so no 'Year of the Consulship of X'), so AUC is useful in that has a Year One that is in the past from the start date yet is still relatively recognisable to a modern-day audience ''and'' is thematically appropriate to the game.

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* The game ''VideoGame/ImperatorRome'' uses this, starting in 350 AUC, right around the time Rome started to grow in power.


It's an specific subtrope of AlternativeCalendar

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It's an a specific subtrope of AlternativeCalendarAlternativeCalendar.




[[folder: Video Games]]
* The video game ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis: Rome'' uses this type of calendar regardless of what nation you choose, even if you play as Carthage, Rome's ArchEnemy.
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[[folder: Video Games]]
* The video game ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis: Rome'' uses this type of calendar regardless of what nation you choose, even if you play as Carthage, Rome's ArchEnemy.
[[/folder]]


* The video game ''EuropaUniversalis: Rome'' uses this type of calendar regardless of what nation you choose, even if you play as Carthage, Rome's ArchEnemy.

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* The video game ''EuropaUniversalis: ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis: Rome'' uses this type of calendar regardless of what nation you choose, even if you play as Carthage, Rome's ArchEnemy.


* The video game ''EuropaUniversalis'': Rome uses this type of calendar regardless of what nation you choose, even if you play as Carthage, Rome's ArchEnemy.

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* The video game ''EuropaUniversalis'': Rome ''EuropaUniversalis: Rome'' uses this type of calendar regardless of what nation you choose, even if you play as Carthage, Rome's ArchEnemy.


* ''OneNationUnderJupiter'': How all the years are numbered, as Christianity never became the dominant religion.

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* ''OneNationUnderJupiter'': ''Literature/OneNationUnderJupiter'': How all the years are numbered, as Christianity never became the dominant religion.

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* ''OneNationUnderJupiter'': How all the years are numbered, as Christianity never became the dominant religion.


* ''Roma Eterna'', an AlternateHistory novel by Creator/RobertSilverberg, features a Roman Empire that endures at least until the 20th century. Its chapters are preceded by dates in AUC style (the latest is AUC 2723, that is 1970 AD).

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* ''Roma Eterna'', ''{{Literature/Roma Eterna}}'', an AlternateHistory novel by Creator/RobertSilverberg, features a Roman Empire that endures at least until the 20th century. Its chapters are preceded by dates in AUC style (the latest is AUC 2723, that is 1970 AD).


* ''Ultima'', the sequel to ''Literature/Proxima'' by Creator/StephenBaxter, prominently features a spaceship run by Space Romans. As a result, the dates in chapter headings are given in both AD and AUC years (e.g. the book begins in 2227 AD and 2980 AUC).

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* ''Ultima'', the sequel to ''Literature/Proxima'' ''{{Literature/Proxima}}'' by Creator/StephenBaxter, prominently features a spaceship run by Space Romans. As a result, the dates in chapter headings are given in both AD and AUC years (e.g. the book begins in 2227 AD and 2980 AUC).

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* ''Roma Eterna'', an AlternateHistory novel by Creator/RobertSilverberg, features a Roman Empire that endures at least until the 20th century. Its chapters are preceded by dates in AUC style (the latest is AUC 2723, that is 1970 AD).


The dominant method of identifying Roman years in Roman times was to name the two consuls who held office that year. The regnal year of the emperor was also used to identify years, especially in the Byzantine Empire after 537, when Justinian required its use. Examples of continuous numbering include counting by regnal year, principally found in the writings of German authors, for example ''Mommsen's History of Rome'', and (most ubiquitously) in the Anno Domini year-numbering system.

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The dominant method of identifying Roman years in Roman times was to name the two consuls who held office that year. The regnal year of the emperor was also used to identify years, especially in the Byzantine Empire UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire after 537, when Justinian required its use. Examples of continuous numbering include counting by regnal year, principally found in the writings of German authors, for example ''Mommsen's History of Rome'', and (most ubiquitously) in the Anno Domini year-numbering system.


* As befits a fantasy novel that crosses countries and continents, ''Literature/DoctrineOfLabyrinths'' uses multiple calendars, the most prominent monthly calendar based on the French Revolutionary calendar. In the country of Marathat, commoners and the elite use different calendars, with commoners' weeks consisting of ten days ("decads") and the upper class using a seven-day week with quasi-French names.

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* ''Ultima'', the sequel to ''Literature/Proxima'' by Creator/StephenBaxter, prominently features a spaceship run by Space Romans. As befits a fantasy novel that crosses countries result, the dates in chapter headings are given in both AD and continents, ''Literature/DoctrineOfLabyrinths'' uses multiple calendars, AUC years (e.g. the most prominent monthly calendar based on the French Revolutionary calendar. In the country of Marathat, commoners book begins in 2227 AD and the elite use different calendars, with commoners' weeks consisting of ten days ("decads") and the upper class using a seven-day week with quasi-French names.2980 AUC).


''Ab urbe condita'' (related with ''Anno Urbis Conditae'': AUC or a.u.c. or a.u.) is a Latin phrase meaning "from the founding of the City (AncientRome)",traditionally dated to 753 BC. AUC is a year-numbering system used by some ancient Roman historians to identify particular Roman years. Renaissance editors sometimes added AUC to Roman manuscripts they published, giving the false impression that the Romans usually numbered their years using the AUC system. In fact, modern historians use AUC much more frequently than the Romans themselves did.

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''Ab urbe condita'' (related with ''Anno Urbis Conditae'': AUC or a.u.c. or a.u.) is a Latin phrase meaning "from the founding of the City (AncientRome)",traditionally (AncientRome)", traditionally dated to 753 BC. AUC is a year-numbering system used by some ancient Roman historians to identify particular Roman years. Renaissance editors sometimes added AUC to Roman manuscripts they published, giving the false impression that the Romans usually numbered their years using the AUC system. In fact, modern historians use AUC much more frequently than the Romans themselves did.


'''VideoGames'''

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'''VideoGames'''

[[folder: Video Games]]


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[[folder: Literature]]
* As befits a fantasy novel that crosses countries and continents, ''Literature/DoctrineOfLabyrinths'' uses multiple calendars, the most prominent monthly calendar based on the French Revolutionary calendar. In the country of Marathat, commoners and the elite use different calendars, with commoners' weeks consisting of ten days ("decads") and the upper class using a seven-day week with quasi-French names.
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'''VideoGames'''

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