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History Literature / TheVoyageOfMaelDuin

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* WalkOnWater: The hermit from Tory relates that he took up his life of penitence because one day, on a pleasure cruise in his boat, he was blown into the open sea and encountered the spirit of a saintly monk "sitting upon the wave". The monk chastised him for his sins and enjoined him to spend the rest of his life as a hermit on a small rock in the sea.

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* WalkOnWater: WalkOnWater:
** Exploring island no. 5, the voyagers see hints that the island is a meeting place of giants, and leave in fright. Looking back, they see a crowd of demonic giants "rushing along the sea to the island".
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The hermit from Tory relates that he took up his life of penitence because one day, on a pleasure cruise in his boat, he was blown into the open sea and encountered the spirit of a saintly monk "sitting upon the wave". The monk chastised him for his sins and enjoined him to spend the rest of his life as a hermit on a small rock in the sea.


** The P. W. Joyce translation describes the voyagers being feasted by the island queen and her daughters before going "to sleep on soft couches till the morning". The original text makes clear that Máel Dúin and his companions sleep with the queen and her daughters respectively, and continue to do so during their entire stay on the island. The same detail is omitted in Jacobs' child-friendly version. Both Joyce and Jacobs also omit that right upon their arrival on the island, the daughters of the queen prepare a bath for the voyagers.

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** The P. W. Joyce translation describes the voyagers being feasted by the island queen and her daughters before going "to sleep on soft couches till the morning". The original text makes clear that Máel Dúin and his companions sleep with the queen and her daughters respectively, and continue to do so during their entire stay on the island. The same detail is omitted in Jacobs' child-friendly version. Both Joyce and Jacobs also omit that right upon their arrival on the island, the daughters of the queen prepare a bath for the voyagers.voyagers, presumably because it is slightly too sexual.


* {{Bowdlerize}}: The translation by P. W. Joyce and the retelling by Creator/JosephJacobs omit that Máel Dúin is the product of a rape. This loses the finer points of the original, namely, that Ailill was no better than the pirates that killed him, and that Máel Dúin's perceived duty to avenge his father to restore the family honor is rather questionable to begin with.

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* {{Bowdlerize}}: {{Bowdlerize}}:
**
The translation by P. W. Joyce and the retelling by Creator/JosephJacobs omit that Máel Dúin is the product of a rape. This loses the finer points of the original, namely, that Ailill was no better than the pirates that killed him, and that Máel Dúin's perceived duty to avenge his father to restore the family honor is rather questionable to begin with.with.
** The P. W. Joyce translation describes the voyagers being feasted by the island queen and her daughters before going "to sleep on soft couches till the morning". The original text makes clear that Máel Dúin and his companions sleep with the queen and her daughters respectively, and continue to do so during their entire stay on the island. The same detail is omitted in Jacobs' child-friendly version. Both Joyce and Jacobs also omit that right upon their arrival on the island, the daughters of the queen prepare a bath for the voyagers.


* TheresNoPlaceLikeHome: The voyagers discover an island ruled by a queen who invites them into her palace and straightaway takes Máel Dúin as her lover and sets up his seventeen companions with her own seventeen daughters. She also reveals that on her island there is no old age, and that they will live an eternal life of pleasure in her palace as long as they stay on the island. After spending three months on the queen's island, Máel Dúin's companions want to return to Ireland. At first Máel Dúin objects on the grounds that their life in Ireland could not possibly be better than their life here; only when his companions announce that they will leave with or without him, Máel Dúin chooses to go with them, rather than to part with them and stay on the island alone.

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* TheresNoPlaceLikeHome: The voyagers discover an island ruled by a queen who invites them into her palace and straightaway takes Máel Dúin as her lover and sets up his seventeen companions with her own seventeen daughters. She also reveals that on her island there is no old age, and that they will live an eternal life of pleasure in her palace as long as they stay on the island. After spending three months on the queen's island, Máel Dúin's companions want to return to Ireland. At first Máel Dúin objects on the grounds that their life in Ireland could not possibly be better than their life here; only when his companions announce that they will leave with or without him, Máel Dúin chooses to go with them, rather than to part with them. The queen does not want them to leave and stay on prevents their departure with magic, until after nine months they outwit the island alone.queen and succeed in leaving the island.

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* TheresNoPlaceLikeHome: The voyagers discover an island ruled by a queen who invites them into her palace and straightaway takes Máel Dúin as her lover and sets up his seventeen companions with her own seventeen daughters. She also reveals that on her island there is no old age, and that they will live an eternal life of pleasure in her palace as long as they stay on the island. After spending three months on the queen's island, Máel Dúin's companions want to return to Ireland. At first Máel Dúin objects on the grounds that their life in Ireland could not possibly be better than their life here; only when his companions announce that they will leave with or without him, Máel Dúin chooses to go with them, rather than to part with them and stay on the island alone.

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* TalkingAnimal: Island no. 18 is discovered by the voyagers when they hear voices and the chanting of psalms, and follow the sound until they see a rock-like island full of talking birds. A little later they land on another small island where an immortal hermit lives with a swarm of birds which, he explains, are the souls of his relatives and descendants who have died back in Ireland. This suggests that all the talking birds are actually human souls awaiting the Last Judgement.

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* MiracleFood: On the island of the four precious walls (no. 16), the voyagers are catered for by a maiden who gives them an unknown kind of food which looks like cheese, but tastes like whatever food one likes best ("whatever taste was pleasing to anyone he would find it therein").


** The voyagers refrain from landing on several islands they discover because the islands are occupied by large monsters whose behavior suggests that they want to eat the voyagers. On island no. 4, there is a huge creature looking like a horse with claws; on island no. 8, there is a bizarre "twisting beast" fenced in by a stone wall going around the island; both of these monsters hurl stones at the voyagers as they are leaving. There is also an island with hungry giant ants, and one with hostile giants who forge iron, and who try to sink them with a mass of glowing iron.

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** The voyagers refrain from landing on several islands they discover because the islands are occupied by large monsters whose behavior suggests that they want to eat the voyagers. On island no. 4, there is a huge creature looking like a horse with claws; on island no. 8, there is a bizarre "twisting beast" fenced in by a stone wall going around the island; both of these monsters hurl stones at the voyagers as they are leaving. There is also an island with [[BigCreepyCrawlies hungry giant ants, ants]], and one with hostile giants who forge iron, and who try to sink them with a mass of glowing iron.


* IsleOfGiantHorrors: Exploring island no. 5, the voyagers discover a large plain with many hoof marks, and each mark is "as large as the sail of a ship". They also see nut shells of unusual size and a lot of "plunder". They become scared and go back to their ship; as they sail away, they observe a crowd of gigantic people approaching the island over the sea, who proceed to put on a horse-race (with equally gigantic horses) on the island. There is no explanation for these happenings, except that the voyagers feel sure that the giants are demons, and accordingly make off as fast as they can.

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* IsleOfGiantHorrors: IsleOfGiantHorrors:
**
Exploring island no. 5, the voyagers discover a large plain with many hoof marks, and each mark is "as large as the sail of a ship". They also see nut shells of unusual size and a lot of "plunder". They become scared and go back to their ship; as they sail away, they observe a crowd of gigantic people approaching the island over the sea, who proceed to put on a horse-race (with equally gigantic horses) on the island. There is no explanation for these happenings, except that the voyagers feel sure that the giants are demons, and accordingly make off as fast as they can.can.
** The voyagers refrain from landing on several islands they discover because the islands are occupied by large monsters whose behavior suggests that they want to eat the voyagers. On island no. 4, there is a huge creature looking like a horse with claws; on island no. 8, there is a bizarre "twisting beast" fenced in by a stone wall going around the island; both of these monsters hurl stones at the voyagers as they are leaving. There is also an island with hungry giant ants, and one with hostile giants who forge iron, and who try to sink them with a mass of glowing iron.

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* BigCreepyCrawlies: The first island seen by the voyagers after leaving the pirate island is overrun by giant ants, "each of them the size of a foal". At the approach of the ship, the ants gather at the strand and even try to swim toward the ship, making the voyagers flee in terror.

Added DiffLines:

* IsleOfGiantHorrors: Exploring island no. 5, the voyagers discover a large plain with many hoof marks, and each mark is "as large as the sail of a ship". They also see nut shells of unusual size and a lot of "plunder". They become scared and go back to their ship; as they sail away, they observe a crowd of gigantic people approaching the island over the sea, who proceed to put on a horse-race (with equally gigantic horses) on the island. There is no explanation for these happenings, except that the voyagers feel sure that the giants are demons, and accordingly make off as fast as they can.

Added DiffLines:

* MonstrousCannibalism: Island no. 8 is populated by large horse-like animals who rend out pieces of flesh from each other's flanks, "so that out of their sides streams of crimson blood were breaking, and thereof the ground was full". The voyagers flee in terror at the sight.


* WalkOnWater: The hermit from Tory relates that he took up his life of penitence because one day, on a pleasure cruise in his boat, he was blown into the open sea and encountered the spirit of a saintly monk „sitting on the waves“. The monk chastised him for his sins and enjoined him to spend the rest of his life as a hermit on a small rock in the sea.

to:

* WalkOnWater: The hermit from Tory relates that he took up his life of penitence because one day, on a pleasure cruise in his boat, he was blown into the open sea and encountered the spirit of a saintly monk „sitting on "sitting upon the waves“.wave". The monk chastised him for his sins and enjoined him to spend the rest of his life as a hermit on a small rock in the sea.

Added DiffLines:

* WalkOnWater: The hermit from Tory relates that he took up his life of penitence because one day, on a pleasure cruise in his boat, he was blown into the open sea and encountered the spirit of a saintly monk „sitting on the waves“. The monk chastised him for his sins and enjoined him to spend the rest of his life as a hermit on a small rock in the sea.


* KarmicDeath: Under attack by a band of sea-raiders, Ailill Aca Ocar takes refuge in a church, but the raiders burn the church with him inside. This detail is a hint that Ailill's death was a divine punishment for the rape of the prioress: That the house of God fails to protect Ailill suggests that God wants him dead; the raiders do not respect the sanctity of the building, just as Ailill did not respect the sanctity of the prioress.

to:

* KarmicDeath: Under attack by a band of sea-raiders, Ailill Aca Ocar takes refuge in a church, but the raiders burn the church with him inside. This detail is a hint that Ailill's death was a divine punishment for the rape of the prioress: That the house of God fails to protect Ailill suggests that God wants denies him dead; protection; the raiders do not respect the sanctity of the building, just as Ailill did not respect the sanctity of the prioress.

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