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* BerserkButton / ThisIsUnforgivable: Calling a Klingon a "willing slave" (tohke straav) is an invitation to get viciously murdered in a hurry.

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* BerserkButton / ThisIsUnforgivable: BerserkButton: Calling a Klingon a "willing slave" (tohke straav) is an invitation to get viciously murdered in a hurry. hurry.


* CoversAlwaysLie: In the course of the book, Spock ''as a child'' plays chess against Krenn; the cover shows an adult Spock doing so.

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* CoversAlwaysLie: CoversAlwaysLie:
**
In the course of the book, Spock ''as a child'' plays chess against Krenn; the cover shows an adult (or at least adolescent) Spock doing so.

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** Also, Krenn is shown with a smooth forehead -- in other words, as a TOS Klingon. The text doesn't specifically state that Krenn has forehead ridges, but Gelly suffers a lot of teasing in the orphanage because she doesn't, so the implication is there that Krenn is of the "imperial race" (see HalfHumanHybrid below) and so would have them.


* BerserkButton / ThisIsUnforgivable: Calling a Klingon a "willing slave" (tohke straav) is an invitation to get viciously murdered in a hurry.



* UnfortunateName: [[PrematurelyBald Rogaine]], [[GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe the Orion concubine]] of Krenn's foster father. The name was a coincidence, as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minoxidil minoxidil]] wasn't approved for topical use as a hair restorer until 1988.

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* UnfortunateName: [[PrematurelyBald UnfortunateName:
**[[PrematurelyBald
Rogaine]], [[GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe the Orion concubine]] of Krenn's foster father. The name was a coincidence, as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minoxidil minoxidil]] wasn't approved for topical use as a hair restorer until 1988.1988.
** Poor Operations Master [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methamphetamine Meth]]...

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* CoversAlwaysLie: In the course of the book, Spock ''as a child'' plays chess against Krenn; the cover shows an adult Spock doing so.


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** In a variation, Krenn's foster father makes him play a game with the ''klin zha'' set he made himself out of cheap rubbish as a child, with the pieces he loses being burnt in the fire. Because the set has sentimental value to Krenn, he must fight all the harder to save as much as he can.


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* TranslationConvention: Noted at the beginning of the story that some common ranks are translated to be more familiar. Other terminology is rendered slightly 'off' to emphasise the Klingons' alien culture. For example, rather than saying things like 'make it so' / 'yes, sir', when giving and receiving orders, the Klingons say 'Action' / 'Acting'.


* SealedBadassInACan: The [[spoiler:Klingons]] have a super-soldier with an enhanced metabolism that makes him practically unbeatable, at the cost of a dramatically reduced lifespan. To get the most possible use out of him, his handlers keep him in cryogenic suspension between missions.

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* SealedBadassInACan: The [[spoiler:Klingons]] have a super-soldier with an enhanced metabolism reflexes that makes him practically unbeatable, at the cost of a dramatically reduced lifespan. To get the most possible use out of him, his handlers keep him in cryogenic suspension between missions.



* SmartPeoplePlayChess: Klingon military strategy is the province of military "thought admirals", who hone their skills in ''klin zha'' (Klingon chess). Krenn's father, who is a thought admiral, also studies other races' equivalents of ''klin zha'', including the Human game ''chess'', to gain insight into the races that play them.

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* SmartPeoplePlayChess: Klingon military strategy is the province of military "thought admirals", "Thought Admirals", who hone their skills in ''klin zha'' (Klingon chess). Krenn's father, who is a thought admiral, Thought Admiral foster-father also studies other races' equivalents of ''klin zha'', including the Human game ''chess'', to gain insight into the races that play them.


* VariantChess: Krenn's father studies other races through their chess-equivalents. Of the several mentioned in the novel, ''klin zha'', the Klingon game, is of particular and recurring significance.

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* VariantChess: Krenn's father studies other races through their chess-equivalents. Of the several mentioned in the novel, ''klin zha'', the Klingon game, is of particular and recurring significance.significance, with several variants of ''klin zha'' described, each having its own significance to the book's themes.


* InterserviceRivalry: Is strong between the Klingon Navy and Marines.

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* InterserviceRivalry: Is strong InterserviceRivalry:
** Strong
between the Klingon Navy and Marines.
** Starfleet and Federation Marines apparently also have this going on. A brawl starts when a Starfleet officer tells some Klingons his name is Marks, and a Klingon responds that he knows many Klingons named Marks, and they're all
Marines.


* LockedInAFreezer: Krenn and two loyal subordinates are locked in his ship's walk-in freezer by a traitor. The situation is even more serious for the hero than usual because Klingon biology is keyed to very warm temperatures (he found the spaceport at White Sands, New Mexico pleasant, if a bit dry), which makes them very susceptible to frostbite.

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* LockedInAFreezer: Krenn and two loyal subordinates are locked in his ship's walk-in freezer by a traitor. The situation is even more serious for the hero than usual because Klingon biology is keyed to very warm temperatures (he found was more annoyed by the dryness at the White Sands spaceport at White Sands, New Mexico pleasant, if a bit dry), than the heat), which makes them very susceptible to frostbite.


** A subtle one in the TOS epsiode [[Recap/StarTrekS3E7DayOfTheDove "The Day of The Dove"]], Klingon transporters are seen operating with a different color pattern and without the characteristic screeching sound. Instead of waving it off as [[SpecialEffectsFailure a mistake]], Ford took this and ran with it, indicating that the sound from Federation transporters came from a secondary carrier wave added to provide a bit more safety; the ever-practical Klingons decided a silent transporter was more valuable than a one percent decrease in errors.

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** A subtle one in the TOS epsiode episode [[Recap/StarTrekS3E7DayOfTheDove "The Day of The Dove"]], Klingon transporters are seen operating with a different color pattern and without the characteristic screeching sound. Instead of waving it off as [[SpecialEffectsFailure a mistake]], Ford took this and ran with it, indicating that the sound from Federation transporters came from a secondary carrier wave added to provide a bit more safety; the ever-practical Klingons decided a silent transporter was more valuable than a one percent decrease in errors.



* FramingDevice: The bulk of ''The Final Reflection'', the real-life tie-in novel, is the text of ''The Final Reflection'', the 23rd-century historical novel, framed by a prologue and epilogue in which the present-day ''Trek'' characters read and react to it.

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* FramingDevice: The bulk of ''The Final Reflection'', the real-life tie-in novel, is the text of ''The Final Reflection'', the 23rd-century historical novel, framed by a prologue and epilogue in which the present-day regular ''Trek'' characters read and react to it.


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/finalreflection.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:250:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/finalreflection.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/finalreflection.jpg]]


* HistoricalDomainCharacter: The novel-within-the-novel has several historical figures in it, including a cameo appearance by a young Spock and his parents. (In the frame story, the real Spock is visibly unhappy about the novel, and refuses to talk about whether the scene has any basis in truth. [=McCoy=] is referred to by a relative as a baby but doesn't appear "on camera".)

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: The novel-within-the-novel has several historical figures in it, including a cameo appearance by a young Spock and his parents. (In the frame story, the real Spock is visibly unhappy about the novel, and refuses to talk about whether the scene has any basis in truth. [=McCoy=] is referred to by ) [=McCoy=]'s grandfather has a relative as a baby small but doesn't appear "on camera".)significant role, and at one point compares one of the novel's antagonists to the contents of "my grandson Leonard's diapers".


* HistoricalDomainCharacter: The novel-within-the-novel has several historical figures in it, including a cameo appearance by a young Spock and his parents. (In the frame story, the real Spock is visibly unhappy about the novel, and refuses to talk about whether the scene has any basis in truth. [[=McCoy=]] is referred to by a relative as a baby but doesn't appear "on camera".)

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: The novel-within-the-novel has several historical figures in it, including a cameo appearance by a young Spock and his parents. (In the frame story, the real Spock is visibly unhappy about the novel, and refuses to talk about whether the scene has any basis in truth. [[=McCoy=]] [=McCoy=] is referred to by a relative as a baby but doesn't appear "on camera".)


* HistoricalDomainCharacter: The novel-within-the-novel has several historical figures in it, including a cameo appearance by a young Spock and his parents. (In the frame story, the real Spock is visibly unhappy about the novel, and refuses to talk about whether the scene has any basis in truth.)

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: The novel-within-the-novel has several historical figures in it, including a cameo appearance by a young Spock and his parents. (In the frame story, the real Spock is visibly unhappy about the novel, and refuses to talk about whether the scene has any basis in truth. [[=McCoy=]] is referred to by a relative as a baby but doesn't appear "on camera".)

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