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* BothSidesHaveAPoint: Bill Masen is initially somewhat shocked at the [[ColdEquation pragmatic abandonment of most of the blind population]] in London by Beadley and the Institute group, and sympathizes with Coker's more idealistic attempt to help them. Ultimately, he comes around to the Beadley position when RealityEnsues, as does Coker himself.

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* BothSidesHaveAPoint: Bill Masen is initially somewhat shocked at the [[ColdEquation pragmatic abandonment of most of the blind population]] in London by Beadley and the Institute group, and sympathizes with Coker's more idealistic attempt to help them. Ultimately, he comes around to the Beadley position when RealityEnsues, the realistic consequences happens, as does Coker himself.



* GenreDeconstruction: The author takes the general "survive the Zombie Apocalypse" horror story (using plants instead of zombies or nuclear war), and extends it forward for several years. Quite simply...scavenging for canned food in the ruins of major cities is ''not'' a viable survival strategy on an extended time scale. Crowds of blind people scavenge in the early days, but there's a finite supply of canned food and they run out eventually. Nor do the more lucky survivors simply flee to a pastoral existence raising their own crops in the countryside. The author repeatedly underlines the point that even those who survived long enough to plow their own fields, need to learn how to forge their own iron to make their own plows. If they're just scavenging old plows, they're not much better than the blind people scrabbling for cans in ruined shops. The entire set of interconnected relationships that are required for civilization are needed for long-term survival.



* RealityEnsues: The author takes the general "survive the Zombie Apocalypse" horror story (using plants instead of zombies or nuclear war), and extends it forward for several years. Quite simply...scavenging for canned food in the ruins of major cities is ''not'' a viable survival strategy on an extended time scale. Crowds of blind people scavenge in the early days, but there's a finite supply of canned food and they run out eventually. Nor do the more lucky survivors simply flee to a pastoral existence raising their own crops in the countryside. The author repeatedly underlines the point that even those who survived long enough to plow their own fields, need to learn how to forge their own iron to make their own plows. If they're just scavenging old plows, they're not much better than the blind people scrabbling for cans in ruined shops. The entire set of interconnected relationships that are required for civilization are needed for long-term survival.

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* TheWholeWorldIsWatching: The majority of the world's population is blinded through observing a strange green meteor shower that lasted long enough to be see all over the world. The protagonist Bill Masen speculates that the "meteor shower" may have been orbiting satellite weapons, triggered accidentally.


* TheLastManHeardAKnock

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* TheLastManHeardAKnockTheLastManHeardAKnock: There are actually plenty of other people around the first few days after the disaster, they're just all blind. After a few weeks this is no longer the case.


* DeathWorld: What Bill fears and imagines the Earth may become through the proliferation of the triffids as he contemplates the future close to the end of the book. He wonders if humanity will be crushed into tiny gated enclaves permanently patrolled to stop the Triffids breaking in. It's not clear by the end of the novel whether or not that is going to be the case.
* DepopulationBomb

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* DeathWorld: What Bill fears and imagines the Earth may become through the proliferation of the triffids as he contemplates the future close to the end of the book. He wonders if humanity will be crushed into tiny gated enclaves permanently patrolled to stop the Triffids breaking in. It's not clear by the end of the novel whether or not that is going to be the case.
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* DepopulationBombDepopulationBomb: The combined effects of suicide after realizing nearly everyone is permanently blind, plagues, and the Triffids mean that most of humanity is dead within a fortnight.



* InMediasRes

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* InMediasRes InMediasRes: The opening of the book is Masen waking in the hospital having missed the meteor shower that blinded most of humanity. The narrative then backtracks a bit to tell us what Triffids are.


* CosyCatastrophe

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* CosyCatastropheCosyCatastrophe: Despite the novel being called the TropeMaker of this genre by fellow science-fiction author Creator/BrianWAldiss, ''Day of the Triffids" actually [[AvertedTrope averts]] a lot of the trope's conventions. Bill actually has a pretty dangerous and rough life after the apocalypse, even as a sighted person. He can't stay in one place lest he be seized by the non-sighted people who will use him as a slave, and the triffids themselves constantly prove a deadly threat throughout the book.


* AreYouSureYouCanDriveThisThing: It turns out that the radio man ''can'' fly a helicopter without any training.

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* AreYouSureYouCanDriveThisThing: It turns out that the radio man ''can'' fly a helicopter without any training. See ButIReadABookAboutIt below.

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* AreYouSureYouCanDriveThisThing: It turns out that the radio man ''can'' fly a helicopter without any training.

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* IntroducedSpeciesCalamity: This is effectively what happens once triffid seeds become scattered around the world. Even then humans are able to control them, until they go blind and are no longer the apex predator on the planet, enabling the triffids to rapidly increase their numbers.


* BothSidesHaveAPoint: Bill Masen is initially somewhat shocked at the pragmatic abandonment of most of the blind population in London by Beadley and the Institute group, and sympathizes with Coker's more idealistic attempt to help them. Ultimately, he comes around to the Beadley position when RealityEnsues, as does Coker himself.

to:

* BothSidesHaveAPoint: Bill Masen is initially somewhat shocked at the [[ColdEquation pragmatic abandonment of most of the blind population population]] in London by Beadley and the Institute group, and sympathizes with Coker's more idealistic attempt to help them. Ultimately, he comes around to the Beadley position when RealityEnsues, as does Coker himself.



* ChekhovsGunman: The EvilRedhead who shoots at Bill's blind group later appears as a member of a new despotic government.

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* ChekhovsGunman: ChekhovsGunman:
**
The EvilRedhead who shoots at Bill's blind group later appears as a member of a new despotic government.

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* DeadlyLunge: Triffids have a slow means of locomotion, but once they are close they can strike a surprising distance by whipping their trunks forwards while simultaneously lashing out with their stinger.

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** Also cited by those convinced that [[AmericaSavesTheDay aid will come from the United States]], failing to realise the disaster is worldwide.

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* DeathWorld: What Bill fears and imagines the Earth may become through the proliferation of the triffids as he contemplates the future close to the end of the book. He wonders if humanity will be crushed into tiny gated enclaves permanently patrolled to stop the Triffids breaking in. It's not clear by the end of the novel whether or not that is going to be the case.


* HopeSpot: Bill references seeing a group who did find a sighted person they were agonizing over: a baby barley ld enough to talk who couldn't give them anything useful.

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* HopeSpot: Bill references seeing a group who did find a sighted person they were agonizing over: a baby barley ld barely old enough to talk who couldn't give them anything useful.



* ProperlyParanoid: At first Bill considers Stephen's efforts to gather guns and establish defenses for his groups base as unecesarry, but in the face of greater and stronger Triffid swarms, and the eventual emerge of Torrence's faction, begins to see this differently.

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* ProperlyParanoid: At first Bill considers Stephen's efforts to gather guns and establish defenses for his groups group's base as unecesarry, unnecessary, but in the face of greater and stronger Triffid swarms, and the eventual emerge emergence of Torrence's faction, begins to see this differently. differently.


* FateWorseThanDeath: Obviously, everyone who's been blinded. Even though Josella's heartbroken at her father being killed by a Triffid, she believes he would have preffered it to being blind - "He loved all this too much."

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* FateWorseThanDeath: Obviously, everyone who's been blinded. Even though Josella's heartbroken at her father being killed by a Triffid, she believes he would have preffered preferred it to being blind - "He loved all this too much."



* NeverLiveItDown: [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] by Josella and her "scandalous" novel ''Sex Is My Adventure''.


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* OnceDoneNeverForgotten: Josella and her "scandalous" novel ''Sex Is My Adventure''. Even the downfall of society doesn't save her from meeting people who go "oh, you're ''that'' Josella Playton".

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* ProperlyParanoid: At first Bill considers Stephen's efforts to gather guns and establish defenses for his groups base as unecesarry, but in the face of greater and stronger Triffid swarms, and the eventual emerge of Torrence's faction, begins to see this differently.

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