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History Literature / PuckOfPooksHill

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* [[AWizardDidIt Puck Did It]]: The logistics of how Puck enables various historical figures to manifest in modern times is never mentioned.

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* [[AWizardDidIt Puck Did It]]: The logistics of how Puck enables various historical figures to manifest in modern times is never mentioned.

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* SocietyMarchesOn: In-universe; Kadmiel is surprised to find out that a Jewish man who accidentally shot a Christian during a pheasant hunt wasn't punished beyond (voluntarily) paying his victim a pound.


* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: A common trick [[{{in-universe}} of Kipling's]] was to follow up a short story with a poem looking at it from the point of view of a secondary character or villain. The results can be startlingly different -- compare "The Knife and the Naked Chalk" to "The Song of the Men's Side".

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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: A common trick [[{{in-universe}} InUniverse of Kipling's]] Kipling's was to follow up a short story with a poem looking at it from the point of view of a secondary character or villain. The results can be startlingly different -- compare "The Knife and the Naked Chalk" to "The Song of the Men's Side".


The book proceeds in a series of short stories, in a variety of genres and styles, about events at various points in history. (Mostly England's history, as each story has some connection with Dan and Una's local area, but there are also stories about local people visiting foreign lands and foreign people who settled locally.)) Some are narrated by Puck himself, others by figures he produces out of history by mysterious means, such as a Roman legionary and a knight who fought with William the Conqueror. Each story has a prologue and epilogue in which Dan and Una come to hear the story and then reflect on what they've heard; as usual for Kipling, there are also poems reflecting themes from the stories.

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The book proceeds in a series of short stories, in a variety of genres and styles, about events at various points in history. (Mostly England's history, as (As each story has some connection with Dan and Una's local area, it's mostly English history, but there are also stories about local people visiting foreign lands and foreign people who settled locally.)) ) Some are narrated by Puck himself, others by figures he produces out of history by mysterious means, such as a Roman legionary and a knight who fought with William the Conqueror. Each story has a prologue and epilogue in which Dan and Una come to hear the story and then reflect on what they've heard; as usual for Kipling, there are also poems reflecting themes from the stories.


The book proceeds in a series of short stories, in a variety of genres and styles, about events at various points in England's history. Some are narrated by Puck himself, others by figures he produces out of history by mysterious means, such as a Roman legionary and a knight who fought with William the Conqueror. Each story has a prologue and epilogue in which Dan and Una come to hear the story and then reflect on what they've heard; as usual for Kipling, there are also poems reflecting themes from the stories.

to:

The book proceeds in a series of short stories, in a variety of genres and styles, about events at various points in history. (Mostly England's history. history, as each story has some connection with Dan and Una's local area, but there are also stories about local people visiting foreign lands and foreign people who settled locally.)) Some are narrated by Puck himself, others by figures he produces out of history by mysterious means, such as a Roman legionary and a knight who fought with William the Conqueror. Each story has a prologue and epilogue in which Dan and Una come to hear the story and then reflect on what they've heard; as usual for Kipling, there are also poems reflecting themes from the stories.


The book proceeds in a series of short stories, in a variety of genres and styles, about events at various points in history. Some are narrated by Puck himself, others by figures he produces out of history by mysterious means, such as a Roman legionary and a knight who fought with William the Conqueror. Each story has a prologue and epilogue in which Dan and Una come to hear the story and then reflect on what they've heard; as usual for Kipling, there are also poems reflecting themes from the stories.

to:

The book proceeds in a series of short stories, in a variety of genres and styles, about events at various points in England's history. Some are narrated by Puck himself, others by figures he produces out of history by mysterious means, such as a Roman legionary and a knight who fought with William the Conqueror. Each story has a prologue and epilogue in which Dan and Una come to hear the story and then reflect on what they've heard; as usual for Kipling, there are also poems reflecting themes from the stories.


* MeaningfulName: Una shares her name with a heroine from ''Literature/TheFaerieQueen'', a famous allegorical poem about the history and culture of England.

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* MeaningfulName: Una shares her name with a heroine from ''Literature/TheFaerieQueen'', ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene'', a famous allegorical poem about the history and culture of England.


* ChekovsGun: The gold Sir Richard hides in the well during "Old Men at Pevensey" [[spoiler: reappears in "The Treasure and the Law", when Kadmiel's associate Elias finds it and plans on giving it to King John, who needs funding to keep up his war against the barons. Kadmiel takes the gold and throws it into the ocean in the hopes that without said funding, John will surrender and sign the Magna Carta, promising a new age of equality and freedom in England.]]

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* ChekovsGun: ChekhovsGun: The gold Sir Richard hides in the well during "Old Men at Pevensey" [[spoiler: reappears in "The Treasure and the Law", when Kadmiel's associate Elias finds it and plans on giving it to King John, who needs funding to keep up his war against the barons. Kadmiel takes the gold and throws it into the ocean in the hopes that without said funding, John will surrender and sign the Magna Carta, promising a new age of equality and freedom in England.]]



* MeaningfulName: Una shares her name with a heroine from ''TheFaerieQueen'', a famous allegorical poem about the history and culture of England.

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* MeaningfulName: Una shares her name with a heroine from ''TheFaerieQueen'', ''Literature/TheFaerieQueen'', a famous allegorical poem about the history and culture of England.


* AmbiguousDisorder: Hobden's son is described as "not quite right in the head", but able to do anything with bees. [[A disguised Puck implies his condition is a family [[BlessedWithSuck blessing]] from the fairies, after one of his maternal ancestors helped the FairFolk leave England. Specifically, "that no Trouble 'ud lie on, no Maid 'ud sigh on, no Night could frighten, no Fright could harm, no Harm could make sin, an' no Woman could make a fool of."]]

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* AmbiguousDisorder: Hobden's son is described as "not quite right in the head", but able to do anything with bees. [[A [[spoiler: A disguised Puck implies his condition is a family [[BlessedWithSuck blessing]] from the fairies, after one of his maternal ancestors helped the FairFolk leave England. Specifically, "that no Trouble 'ud lie on, no Maid 'ud sigh on, no Night could frighten, no Fright could harm, no Harm could make sin, an' no Woman could make a fool of."]]

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* AmbiguousDisorder: Hobden's son is described as "not quite right in the head", but able to do anything with bees. [[A disguised Puck implies his condition is a family [[BlessedWithSuck blessing]] from the fairies, after one of his maternal ancestors helped the FairFolk leave England. Specifically, "that no Trouble 'ud lie on, no Maid 'ud sigh on, no Night could frighten, no Fright could harm, no Harm could make sin, an' no Woman could make a fool of."]]

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* ChekovsGun: The gold Sir Richard hides in the well during "Old Men at Pevensey" [[spoiler: reappears in "The Treasure and the Law", when Kadmiel's associate Elias finds it and plans on giving it to King John, who needs funding to keep up his war against the barons. Kadmiel takes the gold and throws it into the ocean in the hopes that without said funding, John will surrender and sign the Magna Carta, promising a new age of equality and freedom in England.]]


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* MeaningfulName: Una shares her name with a heroine from ''TheFaerieQueen'', a famous allegorical poem about the history and culture of England.

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* CoolOldGuy: Puck, naturally, as the self-proclaimed "oldest Old Thing in England".

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* FieldTripToThePast: An interesting variant; instead of visiting the past themselves, figures from England's history come across the children while they're out playing, and teach them their life stories.

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* FreeRangeChildren: Dan and Una are permitted to wander wide and far over the countryside without adult supervision.

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