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* TakingOverTheTown: In ''The Score'', Parker is recruited to lead a crew to take over and loot and small copper mining town. The town has a curfew, which makes things easier, as the crew only has to take over the police station, the fire station, and the telephone exchange--the only places manned all night--before launching their assault.

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* TakingOverTheTown: In ''The Score'', Parker is recruited to lead a crew to take over and loot and a small copper mining town. The town has a curfew, which makes things easier, as the crew only has to take over the police station, the fire station, and the telephone exchange--the only places manned all night--before launching their assault.


* BallisticDiscount: ''The Outfit'' contains a story about what happened to a young thug who attempted to pull this on an armourer who provides guns to the underworld. He boasted about what was planning so much that word got back to the armourer. He handed the thug a gun that was rigged to blow up in his hand when he fired it.

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* BallisticDiscount: ''The Outfit'' contains a story about what happened to a young thug who attempted to pull this on an armourer who provides guns to the underworld. He boasted about what he was planning so much that word got back to the armourer. He handed the thug a gun that was rigged to blow up in his hand when he fired it.

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* HallOfMirrors: In ''Slayground'', Parker, cornered by rival criminals in a closed up amusement park, takes a precaution to assure that he will not end up confused by the Hall of Mirrors. He spraypaints a white line across the mirrors in the Hall of Mirrors. That way, when he does not see the white line, he knows he has the actual person in his sights.

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* TakingOverTheTown: In ''The Score'', Parker is recruited to lead a crew to take over and loot and small copper mining town. The town has a curfew, which makes things easier, as the crew only has to take over the police station, the fire station, and the telephone exchange--the only places manned all night--before launching their assault.

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/parker_promo_cjpg.jpg]]

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* FromCamouflageToCriminal: Parker served in the army in Europe during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII before being dishonorably discharged for black marketeering. Although he was probably a criminal before he enlisted (or was drafted), it is implied his time in the service is part of why he is so good with firearms. Due to ComicBookTime, his military service is not mentioned in the later novels.

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* DeathByAdaptation: Darwyn Cooke made a few changes in his retelling of the events of ''The Outfit''. In the original, accountant/troubleshooter Quill is [[SpareAMessenger given a message]] by Parker, and thereby survives the events at Bronson's mansion. In the graphic novel, Parker decides to eliminate the middleman and deliver the message himself.

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** Parker's somewhat different characterization in ''The Hunter'' is mainly due to the fact that the story was originally a stand-alone. In both the original and final versions, the end has Parker confronted by some cops who believe he's guilty of one of the few crimes he didn't actually commit in the novel. In the original version, though, [[ShaggyDogStory the cops shoot and kill him]]. Editor Bucklin Moon found this ending unsatisfactory but agreed to buy the novel if Westlake would change the ending, have Parker survive and escape, and provide more Parker novels. Westlake changed the ending, but not some of the other events that make Parker's character even darker in this story than in the future ones.

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* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Parker's not a hero and he doesn't do good deeds, but in ''The Jugger'' he is not setting out with the intent to commit any crimes in particular and actually ends up ridding a small town of a corrupt sheriff. These actions result in blowing his legitimate cover identity, which leaves him broke and in a very bad spot for some time.


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** The Outfit decides it is simply easier to make peace with Parker than to risk further losses fighting him, making a business decision to write off the money and personnel Parker has claimed to that point.

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* ComicBookTime: The Parker novels span 46 years and are usually set at around the time they were published; Parker himself remains a grizzled fortyish throughout. There were some references to his military service (and bad conduct discharge) in World War II in the first few novels, which are later ignored. It helps that he is given very little backstory, so there's not much to retcon.

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* TheCorpseStopsHere: Happens to Parker in ''The Seventh'', when he arrives at his hideout to find his GirlOfTheWeek murdered, and the loot from the most recent heist stolen. A few minutes later, two cops walk in and Parker realizes the killer had waited around until he returned and then called the police.

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* BackAlleyDoctor: In ''The Man With the Getaway Face'', Parker attends a clinic run by a highly skilled plastic surgeon who was blacklisted in Hollywood due to his former membership of the Communist Party. These days he specializes in providing new faces to members of the underworld.

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* DecapitationPresentation: At the end of ''The Man With the Getaway Face'', Parker unzips a travel bag to show May the severed head of Wells: proving that he has upheld his end of the bargain and Wells is dead.

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* ShootTheBuilder: In ''The Man With the Getaway Face'', a criminal on the run returns to the underworld plastic surgeon who changed his face and murders him, as the surgeon was the only one to know what his new face looks like. This causes problems for Parker, who is another client of the surgeon, as the surgeon's staff start hunting down past clients for revenge.


* PragmaticVillainy: In The Handle, Parker is faced with two Mexican thieves who happened to hit his target first, and hidden a portion of the proceeds. Being short on time, he lets them go, noting that an interrogation would be a waste of time, since he doesn't know and Spanish and assumes that they don't understand English.

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* PragmaticVillainy: In The Handle, ''The Handle'', Parker is faced with two Mexican thieves who happened to hit his target first, and hidden a portion of the proceeds. Being short on time, he lets them go, noting that an interrogation would be a waste of time, useless since he doesn't know and any Spanish and assumes that they don't understand English.

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