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[[http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/donkeyskin/index.html "Donkeyskin"]] is a popular FairyTale transcribed by Creator/CharlesPerrault in 1697. Creator/TheBrothersGrimm recorded another variant -- "All-Kind-of-Furs" -- in 1812, and the tale type has been adapted as "Sapsorrow" in ''Series/TheStoryteller'', ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'' by Creator/RobinMcKinley, and in 1970 adapted as a [[TheMusical musical]] by Creator/JacquesDemy, among other adaptations.

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[[http://www.''[[http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/donkeyskin/index.html "Donkeyskin"]] Donkeyskin]]'' is a popular FairyTale transcribed by Creator/CharlesPerrault in 1697. Creator/TheBrothersGrimm recorded another variant -- "All-Kind-of-Furs" -- in 1812, and the tale type has been adapted as "Sapsorrow" in ''Series/TheStoryteller'', ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'' by Creator/RobinMcKinley, and in 1970 adapted as a [[TheMusical musical]] by Creator/JacquesDemy, among other adaptations.

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* ColourCodedForYourConvenience: In the kingdom of Donkeyskin's father, the costumes, the horses and the face make-up of some characters are blue. In the kingdom of the Prince, they are red.

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* TimeStandsStill: When Donkeyskin arrives at the farm, time freezes for the villagers, but not for Donkeyskin and the Old Woman.

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* TheMusical: Demy adapted the fairy tale into a musical film, with music by Michel Legrand.

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* HeirClubForMen: The king and queen only had a daughter, and were content with this. But the queen fell ill and died without leaving a male heir, but not before saddling him with the additional restriction that his new wife equal her in beauty and other attributes. Which, after many failed considerations, leads him to the conclusion that his new wife should be his own daughter. Because that would be more acceptable than simply letting her inherit the throne.


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* LoveFatherLoveSon: The king loves his wife. After she dies, he falls in love with her daughter.


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* PersonWithTheClothing: The princess is nicknamed ''Donkeyskin'', after the skin she wears.


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* ProtagonistTitle: ''Donkeyskin'' is the nickname of the princess who is the protagonist of the tale.


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* RunawayFiance: Donkeyskin flees so that she is not forced to marry her own father.


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* SoBeautifulItsACurse: The princess is so beautiful that she is the only woman who is more beautiful than her mother. Therefore, her father the king wants to marry her.


* TheGenieKnowsJackNicholson: The Lilac Fairy gave the king books by poets of the future. The kings read poems by Creator/JeanCocteau and Guillaume Apollinaire.

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* TheGenieKnowsJackNicholson: The Lilac Fairy gave the king books by poets of the future. The kings read king reads poems by Creator/JeanCocteau and Guillaume Apollinaire.


* SchizoTech: The king and the Lilac Fairy come to the wedding ceremony in a Alouette II helicopter.

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* SchizoTech: The king and the Lilac Fairy come to the wedding ceremony in a an Alouette II helicopter.


!!The 1970 film by Jacques Demy provides examples of:
* TheGenieKnowsJackNicholson: The Lilac Fairy gave the king books by poets of the future. The kings read poems by Jean Cocteau and Guillaume Apollinaire.

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!!The 1970 musical film by Jacques Demy Creator/JacquesDemy provides examples of:
* TheGenieKnowsJackNicholson: The Lilac Fairy gave the king books by poets of the future. The kings read poems by Jean Cocteau Creator/JeanCocteau and Guillaume Apollinaire.Apollinaire.
* LiteralSplitPersonality: When she prepares the cake, Donkeyskin gets split into two copies of herself. A copy wears the sun-gold dress and represents her as a PrincessClassic. The other copy wears the donkey skin and represents her as a slattern.

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!!The 1970 film by Jacques Demy provides examples of:
* TheGenieKnowsJackNicholson: The Lilac Fairy gave the king books by poets of the future. The kings read poems by Jean Cocteau and Guillaume Apollinaire.
* SchizoTech: The king and the Lilac Fairy come to the wedding ceremony in a Alouette II helicopter.

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* WorldsMostBeautifulWoman: The king is looking for a woman more beautiful than his late wife. He does not find any, except her own daughter, so the princess must be the most beautiful woman.


* ParentalIncest: The king falls in love with her daughter and wants to marry her.

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* ParentalIncest: The king falls in love with her daughter and wants to marry her. {{Subverted|Trope}} because she resists his advances and finally marries someone else in the end.


* HappilyEverAfter: The princess marries the prince in the end.



* ParentalIncest: The king falls in love with her daughter and wants to marry her.



%% * KingIncognito: The princess.
%% * PrinceCharming

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%% * KingIncognito: The princess.
%%
princess clothes herself in the donkey's skin so that no one will recognize her, flees his country, travels to a far-away kingdom, and takes a menial job at a farm.
* PrinceCharmingPrinceCharming: The prince is a classical example. He falls in love with the princess, he lifts her out of poverty, and he marries her.
* PrincessClassic: The princess is royalty by birth. She is innocent and beautiful (she is the only woman who is more beautiful than her mother). She falls in love with the prince and she marries him in the end.
* RagsToRoyalty: Snow White Style. The heroine is a princess by birth, but she is forced into hiding to escape her father. She takes a menial job at a farm. She ends up marrying a prince.
* RichesToRags: The princess has to take a menial job at a farm.


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* SolidGoldPoop: The king's donkey can poop gold.


%% * TheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipper

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%% * TheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipperTheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipper: The prince finds the princess's ring in the cake and he announces that he will marry only the girl on whose finger the ring fits.


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* LastRequest: On her death bed, the king's wife demands that he promise not to remarry except to a woman more beautiful than she is.


[[http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/donkeyskin/index.html "Donkeyskin"]] is a popular FairyTale transcribed by Creator/CharlesPerrault in 1697. Creator/TheBrothersGrimm recorded another variant -- "All-Kind-of-Furs" -- in 1812, and the tale type has been adapted as "Sapsorrow" in ''Series/TheStoryteller'', ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'' by Creator/RobinMcKinley, and in 1970 adapted as a [[TheMusical musical]] by Jacques Demy, among other adaptations.

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[[http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/donkeyskin/index.html "Donkeyskin"]] is a popular FairyTale transcribed by Creator/CharlesPerrault in 1697. Creator/TheBrothersGrimm recorded another variant -- "All-Kind-of-Furs" -- in 1812, and the tale type has been adapted as "Sapsorrow" in ''Series/TheStoryteller'', ''Literature/{{Deerskin}}'' by Creator/RobinMcKinley, and in 1970 adapted as a [[TheMusical musical]] by Jacques Demy, Creator/JacquesDemy, among other adaptations.

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* ArrangedMarriage: In one [[{{Bowdlerise}} bowdlerised]] version of the story, instead of wanting to marry his daughter himself, the king wants her to marry a suitor he has chosen so that she can become queen and take over the throne, as his wife's death has made him lose any interest in continuing as king himself. However, the princess doesn't want to marry the intended suitor, prompting her to seek her fairy godmother's help.

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