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* ''Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ '' (1925), the classic silent film starring Ramón Novarro as Ben-Hur and Francis X. Bushman as Messala.
* ''Ben-Hur'' (1959), the classic Panavision extravaganza directed by Creator/WilliamWyler and produced by [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]], by far the best known, starring Creator/CharltonHeston as Ben-Hur and Stephen Boyd as Messala. It was a massive box office success and it cleaned house at the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward ceremony in 1960, being nominated for 12 Academy Awards and winning 11, missing only Adapted Screenplay. The film won Best Picture, Wyler won Best Director, Heston won Best Actor and Hugh Griffith took home Best Supporting Actor for playing Sheikh Ilderim. The 11 Oscars set a record, since matched by ''[[Film/{{Titanic 1997}} Titanic]]'' and ''[[Film/TheLordOfTheRings The Return of the King]]'' but still not beaten. See [[Recap/BenHur here]] for a plot summary.

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* ''Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ '' (1925), the classic [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]] silent film starring Ramón Novarro as Ben-Hur and Francis X. Bushman as Messala.
* ''Ben-Hur'' (1959), the classic Panavision extravaganza directed by Creator/WilliamWyler and produced by [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]], MGM once again, by far the best known, starring Creator/CharltonHeston as Ben-Hur and Stephen Boyd as Messala. It was a massive box office success and it cleaned house at the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward ceremony in 1960, being nominated for 12 Academy Awards and winning 11, missing only Adapted Screenplay. The film won Best Picture, Wyler won Best Director, Heston won Best Actor and Hugh Griffith took home Best Supporting Actor for playing Sheikh Ilderim. The 11 Oscars set a record, since matched by ''[[Film/{{Titanic 1997}} Titanic]]'' and ''[[Film/TheLordOfTheRings The Return of the King]]'' but still not beaten. See [[Recap/BenHur here]] for a plot summary.


* CompressedAdaptation: The film omits Judah's time in Rome entirely (what with Quintus Arrius being an irredeemable bastard and dying early on) and goes straight from his galley ordeal to him meeting Sheik Ilderim.

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* CompressedAdaptation: The film omits Judah's time in Rome entirely (what with Quintus Arrius being an irredeemable bastard and dying who dies early on) and goes straight from his galley ordeal to him meeting Sheik Ilderim.


* EpicMovie: It was the most expensive movie ever made at the time, and one of the most expensive silent movies ever made.



* EpicMovie: Spars with ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'', ''Film/TheTenCommandments'', ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' and ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' as the quintessential example of the type. For that matter, the 1925 silent version was the most expensive movie ever made at the time.

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* EpicMovie: Spars with ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'', ''Film/TheTenCommandments'', ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' and ''Film/DoctorZhivago'' as the quintessential example of the type. For that matter, the 1925 silent version was the most expensive movie ever made at the time.


[[quoteright:300:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/benhur1959.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:300:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/benhur1959.org/pmwiki/pub/images/benhur1959_9.jpg]]


* ''Ben-Hur'' (1959), the classic Panavision extravaganza directed by Creator/WilliamWyler, by far the best known, starring Creator/CharltonHeston as Ben-Hur and Stephen Boyd as Messala. It was a massive box office success and it cleaned house at the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward ceremony in 1960, being nominated for 12 Academy Awards and winning 11, missing only Adapted Screenplay. The film won Best Picture, Wyler won Best Director, Heston won Best Actor and Hugh Griffith took home Best Supporting Actor for playing Sheikh Ilderim. The 11 Oscars set a record, since matched by ''[[Film/{{Titanic 1997}} Titanic]]'' and ''[[Film/TheLordOfTheRings The Return of the King]]'' but still not beaten. See [[Recap/BenHur here]] for a plot summary.

to:

* ''Ben-Hur'' (1959), the classic Panavision extravaganza directed by Creator/WilliamWyler, Creator/WilliamWyler and produced by [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]], by far the best known, starring Creator/CharltonHeston as Ben-Hur and Stephen Boyd as Messala. It was a massive box office success and it cleaned house at the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward ceremony in 1960, being nominated for 12 Academy Awards and winning 11, missing only Adapted Screenplay. The film won Best Picture, Wyler won Best Director, Heston won Best Actor and Hugh Griffith took home Best Supporting Actor for playing Sheikh Ilderim. The 11 Oscars set a record, since matched by ''[[Film/{{Titanic 1997}} Titanic]]'' and ''[[Film/TheLordOfTheRings The Return of the King]]'' but still not beaten. See [[Recap/BenHur here]] for a plot summary.


* CompressedAdaptation: The film omits Judah's time in Rome entirely, going straight from his galley ordeal to him meeting Sheik Ilderim.

to:

* CompressedAdaptation: The film omits Judah's time in Rome entirely, going entirely (what with Quintus Arrius being an irredeemable bastard and dying early on) and goes straight from his galley ordeal to him meeting Sheik Ilderim.


* CoolHelmet: The Hermes-like leather helmet with small wings Messala wears during the ChariotRace.

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* CoolHelmet: The Hermes-like leather helmet with small wings MercurysWings Messala wears during the ChariotRace.

Added DiffLines:

* CoolHelmet: The Hermes-like leather helmet with small wings Messala wears during the ChariotRace.


''Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ'' -- UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} does have an important role in this story, [[HeroOfAnotherStory but it's often tangential]] -- is a novel written by Lewis "Lew" Wallace, a Union general in the American Civil War and Governor of New Mexico, and published in 1880. It was later adapted for several media, starting with theatre as soon as it was published and later providing the basis for several {{epic movie}}s.

to:

''Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ'' -- UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} does have an important role in this story, [[HeroOfAnotherStory but it's often tangential]] -- is a novel written by Lewis "Lew" Wallace, a Union general in the American Civil War and Governor of New Mexico, and published in 1880. It was later adapted for several media, starting with theatre as soon as it was published and later providing the basis for inspiring several {{epic movie}}s.


The story concerns the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish prince from UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} at the beginning of the 1st century AD, when Judea is under [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire Roman]] domination. He is [[EtTuBrute betrayed by his childhood Roman friend]] Messala, ends up enslaved by the Romans and, through several turns of fate, becomes a famed charioteer and, eventually, a Christian. Running in parallel with Judah's narrative is the unfolding story of the Christ himself.

to:

The story concerns the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish prince from UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} at the beginning of the 1st century AD, when Judea is under [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire Roman]] domination. He is [[EtTuBrute betrayed betrayed]] by [[WeUsedToBeFriends his childhood Roman friend]] Messala, ends up enslaved by the Romans and, through several turns of fate, becomes a famed charioteer and, eventually, a Christian. Running in parallel with Judah's narrative is the unfolding story of the Christ himself.


The story concerns the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish prince from UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} at the beginning of the 1st century AD, when Judea is under [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire Roman]] domination. He is [[WeUsedToBeFriends betrayed by his childhood Roman friend]] Messala, ends up enslaved by the Romans and, through several turns of fate, becomes a famed charioteer and, eventually, a Christian. Running in parallel with Judah's narrative is the unfolding story of the Christ himself.

to:

The story concerns the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish prince from UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} at the beginning of the 1st century AD, when Judea is under [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire Roman]] domination. He is [[WeUsedToBeFriends [[EtTuBrute betrayed by his childhood Roman friend]] Messala, ends up enslaved by the Romans and, through several turns of fate, becomes a famed charioteer and, eventually, a Christian. Running in parallel with Judah's narrative is the unfolding story of the Christ himself.


''Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ'' -- UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} does have an important role in this story, [[HeroOfAnotherStory but it's often tangential]] -- is a novel written by Lewis "Lew" Wallace, a Union general in the American Civil War and Governor of New Mexico, and published in 1880. It was later adapted for several media, starting with theatre as soon as it was published and later providing the basis for {{epic movie}}s.

to:

''Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ'' -- UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} does have an important role in this story, [[HeroOfAnotherStory but it's often tangential]] -- is a novel written by Lewis "Lew" Wallace, a Union general in the American Civil War and Governor of New Mexico, and published in 1880. It was later adapted for several media, starting with theatre as soon as it was published and later providing the basis for several {{epic movie}}s.


[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ben-hur-chariot-race_8922.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.[[quoteright:313:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ben-hur-chariot-race_8922.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/benhurbook.jpg]]


* VengeanceFeelsEmpty: A key point in most versions of the story. Judah revenges himself on Messala, but, finding it does not bring him peace, he decides to revenge himself on all of Rome. Only witnessing the crucifixion of Christ convinces him to instead devote his life to his family and faith.
* WeUsedToBeFriends: The basis for the conflict between Ben-Hur and Messala.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Messala is shown being taken away from the chariot race injured but alive, and is described as "broken" after losing his fortune to Judah. He is never mentioned again.



* TraumaCongaLine: What's [[FateWorseThanDeath worse than death]]? Knowing your sister and mother are wasting away in the Valley of the Lepers.
* UndyingLoyalty: Simonides, Judah's father's life-long financial minister and willing slave. Even after being brutally tortured and "beaten out of human shape" by the Romans seeking to claim the family's wealth, he gives them nothing, and when Judah returns he is able to give him access to tremendous wealth necessary to finance his revenge.
* YouAreNumberSix: Ben-Hur being called "Forty-One" on the Galley.



* YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters: Judah is openly skeptical about the zealots' actions, even if he does not hand Dismas over to the Romans and hide him in his house (possibly, [[ThickerThanWater out of loyalty for his sister who has apparently joined them]]). He repeatedly points out that it is unlikely that they will ever be able to drive the all powerful Roman legions out of Judea and that, as a matter of fact, they are only making the Roman rule more oppressive and ruthless. He is [[TheCassandra dramatically proven right]] when the Roman High Command orders an entire legion into the sacred city of Jerusalem as a show of force.








* TraumaCongaLine: What's [[FateWorseThanDeath worse than death]]? Knowing your sister and mother are wasting away in the Valley of the Lepers.
* UndyingLoyalty: Simonides, Judah's father's life-long financial minister and willing slave. Even after being brutally tortured and "beaten out of human shape" by the Romans seeking to claim the family's wealth, he gives them nothing, and when Judah returns he is able to give him access to tremendous wealth necessary to finance his revenge.
* VengeanceFeelsEmpty: A key point in all versions of the story. Judah revenges himself on Messala, but, finding it does not bring him peace, he decides to revenge himself on all of Rome. Only witnessing the crucifixion of Christ convinces him to instead devote his life to his family and faith.
* WeUsedToBeFriends: The basis for the conflict between Ben-Hur and Messala.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: In the 1925 movie Messala is shown being taken away from the chariot race injured but alive, and is described as "broken" after losing his fortune to Judah. He is never mentioned again. (The 1959 film includes a death scene for Messala.)
* YouAreNumberSix: Ben-Hur being called "Forty-One" on the Galley.
* YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters: In the 2016 movie Ben-Hur is openly skeptical about the zealots' actions, even if he does not hand Dismas over to the Romans and hide him in his house (possibly, [[ThickerThanWater out of loyalty for his sister who has apparently joined them]]). He repeatedly points out that it is unlikely that they will ever be able to drive the all powerful Roman legions out of Judea and that, as a matter of fact, they are only making the Roman rule more oppressive and ruthless. He is [[TheCassandra dramatically proven right]] when the Roman High Command orders an entire legion into the sacred city of Jerusalem as a show of force.


* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Judah's not exactly roaring with it when he returns demanding his family's release, but he's close, and by the time of the ChariotRace, this trope is in full effect.
* SidelongGlanceBiopic: A borderline example, since the places the story of the Gospel in the background of Judah's adventures.
* SparedByTheAdaptation:
** In the 1925 film, although Messala [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse disappears after the chariot race]], he is said to have survived and lost his fortune to Judah after betting on himself to win the race.
** In the 2003 film, Messala lives on as a cripple and is healed at the death of Christ where he reconciles with the House of Hur.
** In the 2016 film, Messala is shown escaping Jerusalem alongside Ben and Esther after he reconciles with the Judah household.



* SplashOfColor: Most of the film is shot in black and white, but most of the scenes that deal with Christ are colorized, as is Ben-Hur's triumph and the final scene.



* RemakeCameo: Various sources indicate that May [=McEvoy=], who played Esther in the 1925 film, appears as an extra in a crowd scene somewhere in the 1959 film.
* SlaveGalley: TropeCodifier. Chained rowers, brutal overseers with whips, and a drummer.
* SistineSteal: The movie popularized the use of ''The Creation of Adam'' in mainstream media (although not a parody here).
* TimePassageBeard: Judah grows one during his years in the galley.



* RemakeCameo: Various sources indicate that May [=McEvoy=], who played Esther in the 1925 film, appears as an extra in a crowd scene somewhere in the 1959 movie.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Judah's not exactly roaring with it when he returns demanding his family's release, but he's close, and by the time of the ChariotRace this trope is in full effect.
* ShiningCity: Rome and Jerusalem.
* SidelongGlanceBiopic: A borderline example, since the places the story of the gospel in the background of Judah's adventures.
* SistineSteal: The movie popularized the use of ''The Creation of Adam'' in mainstream media (although not a parody here).
* SlaveGalley: TropeCodifier. Chained rowers, brutal overseers with whips, and a drummer.
* SparedByTheAdaptation:
** In the 1925 film, although Messala [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse disappears after the chariot race]], he is said to have survived and lost his fortune to Judah after betting on himself to win the race.
** In the 2003 film, Messala lives on as a cripple and is healed at the death of Christ where he reconciles with the House of Hur.
** In the 2016 film, Messala is shown escaping Jerusalem alongside Ben and Esther after he reconciles with the Judah household.
* SplashOfColor: Most of the 1925 silent version is shot in black and white, but most of the scenes that deal with Christ are in color, as is Ben-Hur's triumph and the final scene.
* SwordAndSandal
* TimePassageBeard: Judah grows one during his years in the galley.
* TraumaCongaLine: What's [[FateWorseThanDeath worse than death]]? Knowing your sister and mother are wasting away in The Valley of the Lepers.

to:

* RemakeCameo: Various sources indicate that May [=McEvoy=], who played Esther in the 1925 film, appears as an extra in a crowd scene somewhere in the 1959 movie.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: Judah's not exactly roaring with it when he returns demanding his family's release, but he's close, and by the time of the ChariotRace this trope is in full effect.
* ShiningCity: Rome and Jerusalem.
* SidelongGlanceBiopic: A borderline example, since the places the story of the gospel in the background of Judah's adventures.
* SistineSteal: The movie popularized the use of ''The Creation of Adam'' in mainstream media (although not a parody here).
* SlaveGalley: TropeCodifier. Chained rowers, brutal overseers with whips, and a drummer.
* SparedByTheAdaptation:
** In the 1925 film, although Messala [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse disappears after the chariot race]], he is said to have survived and lost his fortune to Judah after betting on himself to win the race.
** In the 2003 film, Messala lives on as a cripple and is healed at the death of Christ where he reconciles with the House of Hur.
** In the 2016 film, Messala is shown escaping Jerusalem alongside Ben and Esther after he reconciles with the Judah household.
* SplashOfColor: Most of the 1925 silent version is shot in black and white, but most of the scenes that deal with Christ are in color, as is Ben-Hur's triumph and the final scene.
* SwordAndSandal
* TimePassageBeard: Judah grows one during his years in the galley.

* TraumaCongaLine: What's [[FateWorseThanDeath worse than death]]? Knowing your sister and mother are wasting away in The the Valley of the Lepers.

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