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* To beat Scar in ''VideoGame/TheLionKing'' game you need to throw him off the cliff. Nothing in the fight itself specifies this, so anyone who played the game before seeing [[Disney/TheLionKing the movie]] will likely be stumped.

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* To beat Scar in ''VideoGame/TheLionKing'' game you need to throw him off the cliff. Nothing in the fight itself specifies this, so anyone who played the game before seeing [[Disney/TheLionKing [[WesternAnimation/TheLionKing1994 the movie]] will likely be stumped.


** In the World 4 Ghost House in the first game, there's a room where four blocks on strings fall from the top of the screen when you activate a ? Switch. In order to get the first Star Coin in the level, you have to jump on one of the blocks and wait for the switch to deactivate, at which point the blocks go back up and warp you to the otherwise-inaccessible upper area of the main room. There is nothing that indicates this will happen if you ride the block upward.

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** In the World 4 Ghost House in the first game, there's a room where four blocks on strings fall from the top of the screen when you activate a ? Switch. In order to get the first Star Coin in the level, you have to jump on one of the blocks and wait for the switch to deactivate, at which point the blocks go back up and warp you to the otherwise-inaccessible upper area of the main first room. There is nothing that indicates this will happen if you ride the block upward.upward.
** In the World 5 Ghost House in the first game, the level's secret exit and third Star Coin are in a hidden room which you can only reach if you find a set of three invisible blocks, jump onto the center block, and jump while crouching to hit another invisible block that spawns a vine up to the door.


** The game utterly fails to tell you that you can get goodies if you go into certain places with certain birds and spray them with water; your only hint is that spraying them makes the same sound that plays when you spray Shadow Mario's Graffiti. Green birds transform into coins, blue birds transform into Blue Coins, yellow birds transform into Shine Sprites, and red birds transform into Red Coins (but that only happens once). Once you figure out the general pattern, though, you can find the related secrets pretty easily.

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** The game utterly fails to tell you that you can get goodies if you go into certain places with certain spray the birds and spray around the levels or eat them with water; Yoshi; your only hint is that spraying them makes the same distinct sound that plays when you spray other things that have adverse reactions, like Shadow Mario's Graffiti.Mario, his Graffiti, and Proto Piranhas. Green birds transform into coins, blue birds transform into Blue Coins, yellow birds transform into Shine Sprites, and red birds transform into Red Coins (but that only happens once). Once you figure out the general pattern, though, you can find the related secrets pretty easily.


** The barrel wasn't even ''designed'' to be a puzzle. It was simple one of many obstacles designed to slow you down and [[MarathonLevel eat up your precious time]]. The developers failed to consider that figuring out how to get past the barrel would even be an issue. This might be why the game's manual mentions Dr. Robotnik's "diabolical traps" that were designed to be inescapable except for letting time run out; while most people thought it referred to the Barrel of Doom, it did so in the context of being one of many things (some of them [[HandWave glitches]]) that would slow you down, not something that you had to solve. This conception of the Barrel was {{lampshaded}} in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comics]], where [[KillerRobot Omega]] encounters the Barrel and decides to [[CuttingTheKnot just blow it up]].

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** The barrel wasn't even ''designed'' to be a puzzle. It was simple simply one of many obstacles designed to slow you down and [[MarathonLevel eat up your precious time]]. The developers failed to consider that figuring out how to get past the barrel would even be an issue. This might be why the game's manual mentions Dr. Robotnik's "diabolical traps" that were designed to be inescapable except for letting time run out; while most people thought it referred to the Barrel of Doom, it did so in the context of being one of many things (some of them [[HandWave glitches]]) that would slow you down, not something that you had to solve. This conception of the Barrel was {{lampshaded}} in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comics]], where [[KillerRobot Omega]] encounters the Barrel and decides to [[CuttingTheKnot just blow it up]].



*** One oin the Mystic Ruins requires flying over a large, seemingly empty space as Knuckles -- and the emblem itself won't show up because of the draw distance until you're actually close to it, so you wouldn't even think about jumping and gliding across that super large bottomless pit unless you somehow knew the emblem was there.

to:

*** One oin in the Mystic Ruins requires flying over a large, seemingly empty space as Knuckles -- and the emblem itself won't show up because of the draw distance until you're actually close to it, so you wouldn't even think about jumping and gliding across that super large bottomless pit unless you somehow knew the emblem was there.



** The second Star Coin of World 1 Tower in ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros2'', where the coin only appears when a switch pressed in the lower part of the room is active, and the game doesn't even hint at there being an upper portion of the room. What's worse, there are also some temporary coins hidden in that room, making players think they've already found the room's reward and not think to explore some more.

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** The second Star Coin of World 1 Tower in ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros2'', where the coin only appears when a switch P-Switch pressed in the lower part of the room is active, and the game doesn't even hint at there being an upper portion of the room. What's worse, there are also some temporary coins hidden in that room, spawned by the P-Switch, making players think they've already found the room's reward and not think to explore some more.



** In one of the ghost houses in the first game, there's a Star Coin in a hidden room which you can only reach if you stand on a certain block and jump while crouching to hit an invisible block.
** Finding secret exits in the ''Mario'' series can be a challenge on its own, but in ''VideoGame/NewSuperLuigiU'', two of them are found by ground pounding completely normal looking ground, because it turns out that ground is actually made of Brick Blocks that are obscuring a fake wall.

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** In one of the ghost houses World 4 Ghost House in the first game, there's a room where four blocks on strings fall from the top of the screen when you activate a ? Switch. In order to get the first Star Coin in a hidden room the level, you have to jump on one of the blocks and wait for the switch to deactivate, at which point the blocks go back up and warp you can only reach to the otherwise-inaccessible upper area of the main room. There is nothing that indicates this will happen if you stand on a certain ride the block and jump while crouching to hit an invisible block.
upward.
** Finding secret exits in the ''Mario'' series can be a challenge on its own, but in ''VideoGame/NewSuperLuigiU'', two of them (one in World 1-2 and one in World 2-4) are found by ground pounding completely normal looking ground, because it turns out that ground is actually made of Brick Blocks that are obscuring a fake wall.



** The last whistle is in World 2, the desert, and you have to break a rock that's delicately placed to blend into the background. Without seeing something like ''Film/TheWizard'', your only clue is to TryEverything (because up until that point you aren't told what the Hammer actually ''does'', and there's no penalty for trying the Hammer on every square).

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** The last whistle is in World 2, the desert, and you have to break a rock on the top-right corner of the map that's delicately placed to blend into the background. Without seeing something like ''Film/TheWizard'', your only clue is to TryEverything (because up until that point you aren't told what the Hammer actually ''does'', and there's no penalty for trying the Hammer on every square).



** One of the secret Shine Sprites in Pianta Village can only be found if you stand on the platform atop the tallest tree, look straight up, and spray water ''at the sun''. After you spray it, a Shine will pop out. Another mission in the same area requires you to find a different spot and spray water at the ''moon''. A villager hints at these (and who talks to villagers anyway?), but only obliquely -- she only talks about the moon in Episode 5 and the sun in Episode 8.

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** One of the secret Shine Sprites in Pianta Village can only be found if you stand on the platform atop the tallest tree, look straight up, and spray water ''at the sun''. After you spray it, a Shine will pop out. Another mission in the same area requires you to find a different spot and spray water at the ''moon''. A villager hints at these (and who talks bear in mind that talking to villagers anyway?), is optional in the first place), but only obliquely -- she only talks about the moon in Episode 5 and the sun in Episode 8.



** The game utterly fails to tell you that you can get goodies if you go into certain places with certain birds and spray them with water. Blue birds will transform into Blue Coins, yellow birds transform into Shine Sprites, and red birds transform into Red Coins (but that only happens once). Once you figure out the general pattern, though, you can find the related secrets pretty easily.
** Yoshi can eat the bees that emerge from the beehives in certain levels. This in itself is something that a player is likely to discover. However, you can get a Blue Coin by knocking down the beehive by spraying or by jumping on it and then having Yoshi eat all ''those'' bees as well, which is also something that's not likely to occur to the average player (in part because [[ViolationOfCommonSense knocking down a beehive seems like it would be a bad idea]]).

to:

** The game utterly fails to tell you that you can get goodies if you go into certain places with certain birds and spray them with water. Blue water; your only hint is that spraying them makes the same sound that plays when you spray Shadow Mario's Graffiti. Green birds will transform into coins, blue birds transform into Blue Coins, yellow birds transform into Shine Sprites, and red birds transform into Red Coins (but that only happens once). Once you figure out the general pattern, though, you can find the related secrets pretty easily.
** Yoshi can eat the bees that emerge from the beehives in certain levels. This in itself is something that a player is likely to discover. However, you can get a Blue Coin by knocking down the beehive by spraying with spray or by jumping on it a stomp and then having Yoshi eat all ''those'' bees as well, which is also something that's not likely to occur to the average player (in part because [[ViolationOfCommonSense knocking down a beehive seems like it would be a bad idea]]).


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** One Blue Coin in Sirena Beach will pop out when you spray the flower garden at the top right of the hotel's exterior. Another Blue Coin in the same level requires you to ground pound in front of one of the tiny slot machines in the casino, which also causes coins to pop out when done with the other slot machines.


* ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'' has Space Gadget. The Hero mission is just the Neutral mission on a five minute time limit. If you want to get to Cosmic Fall from this level by clearing the Neutral mission, you have to let the clock run past five minutes, otherwise the game will count getting to the goal as passing the Hero mission and sending you to Final Haunt. Manually selecting the Hero or Neutral mission in the pause menu does nothing to change which mission the game says you've cleared. This is the only stage where something like this happens.
* As seen in the page image, Carnival Night Zone, Act 2 from ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' features a section where the player encounters a barrel that there is no obvious way to move, [[http://info.sonicretro.org/Carnival_Night_Zone#Barrel_of_Doom also known as]] "[[DoomyDoomsOfDoom The Barrel of Doom]]." The solution is to stand on the barrel and alternate between pressing UP and DOWN on the D-pad in sync with the barrel's bobbing motion to shift its weight. However, nothing in the game indicates that this is possible, jumping on every other barrel got you safely through, and it's highly unlikely the player would think to try this on their own. This was such a bad case of the trope that Yuji Naka ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XeBgeN5uG8 publicly apologized for it]]'' in 2011 at Summer of Sonic in London.
** While the down key is used frequently in gameplay, the up key has little to no use in the game elsewhere. The up and down keys also appear to be non-functional while standing on a barrel. Pressing up or down does not make Sonic look up or duck down like he does elsewhere. If the barrel is stationary, pressing the up or down keys will do nothing. If you tap the up and down keys randomly, you're not likely to notice a change in the barrel's velocity.
** Jumping on a barrel makes it move. In fact, it is the only thing a player can do to a barrel that is guaranteed to give instantaneous feedback. It doesn't help that carefully timed jumps on any other barrel in the zone ''will'' be enough to pass them. it also doesn't help that pretty much everything else in the franchise up to this point exposed to stimuli which demanded quick reactions from us and conditioned us to believe that simple actions would always instantly give players the feedback they need. It is only ''just'' possible to get past the Barrel of Doom by jumping on it until it falls low enough that you can spin-dash under it when it pops back up. Players that could ''almost'' make it would believe they were doing the right thing, just not well enough. Plus, this method would often leave you with not enough time to reach the next checkpoint.
** That barrel is the only barrel in the zone that cannot be skipped. You ''will'' run into it, unless you're playing as Knuckles.
** If you read the manual, and saw the tip about how Sonic would sometimes run into "diabolical traps" set by Dr. Robotnik that were completely inescapable except by waiting for time to run out or resetting the game, chances are you wouldn't realize that it was actually [[HandWave handwaving]] the rather large number of glitches that the player might encounter, and instead think it was referring to That F-ing Barrel.
** Finally, the fact that merely standing on the barrel makes Sonic spin around vertically, which in any other situation would imply that he can't be controlled beyond making him jump off it, discourages people from actively trying to figure out what they need to do.
** The barrel's many frustrating features can all be chalked up to one thing -- it's ''not actually a puzzle''. It was simply intended as yet another of the myriad obstacles in Carnival Night Zone Act 2 that [[MarathonLevel eat up your precious time]], and the devs failed to consider that figuring out how to move the barrel would ever be an issue. This led to the rise of a video game urban legend ó back around the time of the game's release, when you called Sega's help line, the line's automated greeting was supposedly along the lines of "Welcome to the Sega help line! To get past the red and white swirly things in Carnival Night Act 2..."
** This was even made fun of in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comicbooks]] where the barrel gets destroyed by Omega. After all, why would go through the hell of trying to get past it when you have a KillerRobot that can just blow up anything in your way?
* ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' has a few Adventure Field emblems that can be tricky to find. One of them in the Mystic Ruins requires flying over a large, seemingly empty space as Knuckles -- and the emblem itself ''won't show up because of the draw distance'' until you're actually close to it so you wouldn't even think about jumping and gliding across that super large bottomless pit unless you somehow knew the emblem was there. Another one in the Egg Carrier requires you to fly on top of the giant spinning contraption at the back end of the ship's outside area as Tails. However, the emblem is only collectible when the ship is in ''wings out'' mode that separates the front and back ends of the ship and allows you to enter the Sky Deck stage. You change the ship around by pressing a big red switch on the ground located in the control room near the giant spinning thing. Every time you come back to the Egg Carrier after it's landed in the sea, the ship is always set to ''wings in'' mode by default. It's so obscure to that even if you went up there the first time with the ship in ''wings in'' mode and found no emblem up there, then you'd likely think that particular emblem was located somewhere else, leaving you stumped until you finally looked up and found you have to transform the ship to make the emblem appear.
** Most of the secret optional power ups/upgrades for all the characters, despite not being explained or shown in the manual, are not that difficult to find if you take time to explore the Adventure Fields (except for one upgrade for Big that is actually found in a secret area of Ice Cap). However Amy's Long Hammer upgrade just takes the cake for this trope. In order to obtain it, you have to play the Hedgehog Hammer minigame again after getting the Warrior Feather in the Adventure field (doing it from Trial mode in the Games menu will not work) and get a certain high number of points. On top of that, you have to play the minigame after the Egg Carrier has landed in the ocean, so either go back there after killing Zero or go back immediately after Tails drops you off in Station Square by taking the boat by the sea, and NOT immediately after getting the Warrior Feather. Nothing in the game ever hints at giving the Hedgehog Hammer another go after the Egg Carrier crashes, so many would have seen no point in playing the game again other then to get the emblem for it in Trial mode.
** During the final boss of ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', It's possible to [[spoiler:switch characters by flying past the Finalhazard.]] The game doesn't tell you how to do this, which can be real problematic [[spoiler:if you're running out of rings but can't land a hit.]]
** Amy's got another example that's more of a case of FigureItOutYourself. She's pigeon-toed with an overlapping gait and runs a lot slower than she would otherwise, so the way to get her grade A emblems is by getting her to take the biggest leaps possible as you move through her stages.
** [[VideoGame/SonicAdventure Both]] ''[[VideoGame/SonicAdventure2 Sonic Adventure]]'' games feature Chao, cute little critters that you can breed and raise. One mini-game includes racing the Chao, and if you win, you unlock an emblem. Along with their regular stats (Swim, Fly, Run, Power and Stamina), in the second game you also have two ''invisible'' stats, Luck and Intelligence. Nothing in the game tells you how to increase these stats, or what they do, leaving many gamers baffled. It turns out Luck prevents Chao from tripping, and Intelligence determines how well they solve puzzles. Good luck figuring that out on your own. Without a guide, you wouldn't even know they existed.
** Chao raising on the original Dreamcast version of both games is poorly explained. You can only see a Chao's stats, give them a name and have access to all the different types of fruits if you transferred them into your VMU via the machine located in every garden. However, this is not explained by the games, nor their manuals.\\
The first game has a monitor in the Station Square garden hinting that different fruits have different effects on the chao, but doesn't explain how to obtain them. There is also a Tikal hint orb which tells the player that animals can change the Chao's appearance, but omits the fact that it also affects the chao's stats.\\
The second game's Luck and Intelligence stats can only be raised through the VMU, the former through a mini game about picking a jack-in-a-box, and the latter by feeding the chao a special fruit only obtainable on the VMU. If you didn't have a VMU, you would never be able to raise these important stats.

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* ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'' has Space Gadget. The Hero mission is just the Neutral mission on a five minute time limit. If you want to get to Cosmic Fall from this level by clearing the Neutral mission, you have to let the clock run past five minutes, otherwise minutes; otherwise, the game will count getting to the goal as passing the Hero mission and sending you to Final Haunt. Manually selecting the Hero or Neutral mission in the pause menu does nothing to change which mission the game says you've cleared. This is the only stage where something like this happens.
* As seen in the The page image, Carnival Night Zone, Act 2 image is from ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' features ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'', and it shows a section where puzzle [[DoomyDoomsOfDoom appropriately]] known as the player encounters a barrel that there is no obvious way to move, [[http://info."[[http://info.sonicretro.org/Carnival_Night_Zone#Barrel_of_Doom also known as]] "[[DoomyDoomsOfDoom The Barrel of Doom]]." The solution is to stand on the barrel and alternate between pressing UP and DOWN on the D-pad Doom]]". It's found in sync with the barrel's bobbing motion to shift its weight. However, nothing in the game indicates that this is possible, jumping on every other barrel got you safely through, Carnival Night Zone Act 2, and it's highly unlikely the player would think to try this on their own. This was such a bad case of the trope so infamous that series creator Yuji Naka ''[[https://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XeBgeN5uG8 publicly apologized for it]]'' it]] in 2011 and an UrbanLegendOfZelda suggests that calling Sega's help line at Summer of Sonic in London.
** While
the time would give you an automated message telling you how to get past it. All it takes is standing on the barrel and alternating between pressing up and down key is used frequently in gameplay, on the D-pad, in sync with the barrel's bobbing motion, to shift its weight. Except nobody could figure it out because:
** You encounter other barrels in the game, every one of which is passable just by jumping on it. They're all even ''skippable'', and this is the only one that isn't (unless you're playing as Knuckles). Jumping on ''this'' barrel will move it, just like with all the other ones, and if you jump on it enough, you can ''theoretically'' spin-dash under it when it pops back
up key (but this is really hard to do, and it usually doesn't leave you enough time to finish the level), so players would assume that this is what you have to do -- and get frustrated when they ''almost'' pull it off, thinking they're on the right track but just not doing well enough. In fact, jumping on the barrel is the only thing that's guaranteed to give instantaneous feedback, and veteran ''Sonic'' players are conditioned to expect that feedback to show the way forward.
** Pressing up on the D-pad
has little to no use elsewhere in the game elsewhere. The up and down keys also appear to be non-functional game. Even pressing it while standing on a barrel. the barrel while it's stationary doesn't make it move, so no feedback there. Pressing up or down does not doesn't even make Sonic look up or duck down like he does elsewhere. If the barrel is stationary, pressing the up or down keys will do nothing. If you tap the up and down keys randomly, you're not likely to notice a change in the barrel's velocity.
** Jumping on a barrel makes it move. In fact, it is the
The only thing a player can do to a barrel that is guaranteed to give instantaneous feedback. It doesn't help that carefully timed jumps on any other barrel in the zone ''will'' be enough to pass them. it also doesn't help that pretty much everything else in the franchise up to this point exposed to stimuli which demanded quick reactions from us and conditioned us to believe that simple actions would always instantly give players the feedback they need. It is only ''just'' possible to get past the Barrel of Doom by jumping on it until it falls low enough that you can spin-dash under it when it pops back up. Players that could ''almost'' make it would believe they were doing the right thing, just not well enough. Plus, this method would often leave you with not enough time to reach the next checkpoint.
** That barrel is the only barrel in the zone that cannot be skipped. You ''will'' run into it, unless you're playing as Knuckles.
** If you read the manual, and saw the tip about how Sonic would sometimes run into "diabolical traps" set by Dr. Robotnik that were completely inescapable except by waiting for time to run
way you'd figure out or resetting the game, chances are you wouldn't realize that it was actually [[HandWave handwaving]] the rather large number of glitches that the player might encounter, ''does'' do something is by desperately mashing buttons and instead think it was referring to That F-ing Barrel.
** Finally, the fact that merely
hoping something happens. And just standing on the barrel makes causes Sonic to spin around vertically, which in any other situation would imply suggesting that he can't even be controlled beyond making him unless you jump off it, discourages people from actively trying to figure out what they need to do.
it.
** The barrel's many frustrating features can all barrel wasn't even ''designed'' to be chalked up to one thing -- it's ''not actually a puzzle''. puzzle. It was simply intended as yet another simple one of the myriad many obstacles in Carnival Night Zone Act 2 that designed to slow you down and [[MarathonLevel eat up your precious time]], and the devs time]]. The developers failed to consider that figuring out how to move get past the barrel would ever even be an issue. This led to the rise of a video game urban legend ó back around the time of might be why the game's release, when you called Sega's help line, the line's automated greeting was supposedly along the lines of "Welcome manual mentions Dr. Robotnik's "diabolical traps" that were designed to be inescapable except for letting time run out; while most people thought it referred to the Sega help line! To get past Barrel of Doom, it did so in the red and white swirly context of being one of many things in Carnival Night Act 2..."
**
(some of them [[HandWave glitches]]) that would slow you down, not something that you had to solve. This conception of the Barrel was even made fun of {{lampshaded}} in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comicbooks]] comics]], where [[KillerRobot Omega]] encounters the barrel gets destroyed by Omega. After all, why would go through the hell of trying Barrel and decides to get past it when you have a KillerRobot that can [[CuttingTheKnot just blow up anything in your way?
it up]].
* ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'':
** The first game
has a few Adventure Field emblems that can be tricky to find. find:
***
One of them in oin the Mystic Ruins requires flying over a large, seemingly empty space as Knuckles -- and the emblem itself ''won't won't show up because of the draw distance'' distance until you're actually close to it it, so you wouldn't even think about jumping and gliding across that super large bottomless pit unless you somehow knew the emblem was there. Another one there.
*** One
in the Egg Carrier requires you to fly on top of the giant spinning contraption at the back end of the ship's outside area as Tails. However, the emblem is only collectible when the ship is in ''wings out'' mode that separates the front and back ends of the ship and allows you to enter the Sky Deck stage. You change the ship around by pressing a big red switch on the ground located in the control room near the giant spinning thing. Every time you come back to the Egg Carrier after it's landed in the sea, the ship is always set to ''wings in'' mode by default. It's so obscure to that even if you went up there the first time with the ship in ''wings in'' mode and found no emblem up there, then you'd likely think that particular emblem was located somewhere else, leaving you stumped until you finally looked up and found you have to transform the ship to make the emblem appear.
** Most of the secret optional power ups/upgrades powerups and upgrades for all the characters, despite not being explained or shown in the manual, are not that difficult to find if you take time to explore the Adventure Fields (except for one upgrade for Big that is actually found in a secret area of Ice Cap). However Amy's Long Hammer upgrade just takes is the cake for this trope. big exception. In order to obtain it, you have to play the Hedgehog Hammer minigame again and get a certain high score. However, you have to do it in the Adventure Field after getting the Warrior Feather in the Adventure field (doing it from in Trial mode in the Games menu will not work) won't work), and get a certain high number of points. On top of that, you have to play the minigame do it after the Egg Carrier has landed in the ocean, so either ocean. This requires you to think to go back there after killing Zero or go back either immediately after Tails drops you off in Station Square by (by taking the boat by the sea, and NOT immediately boat) or after getting the Warrior Feather.killing Zero. Nothing in the game ever hints at giving the Hedgehog Hammer another go after the Egg Carrier crashes, so many would have seen no point in playing the game again other then to get the emblem for it in Trial mode.
** During the final boss fight of ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', It's it's possible to [[spoiler:switch characters by flying past the Finalhazard.]] Finalhazard]]. The game doesn't tell you how to do this, which can be real problematic [[spoiler:if you're running out of rings but can't land a hit.]]
hit]].
** Amy's got another example that's more of a case of FigureItOutYourself. She's In general, Amy has an unusual control feel; she's pigeon-toed with an overlapping gait and runs gait, which causes her to run a lot slower than she would otherwise, so the otherwise. The way to get her grade A emblems is by getting her to take the biggest leaps possible as you move through her stages.
stages. Nothing in the game tells you anything about this.
** [[VideoGame/SonicAdventure Both]] ''[[VideoGame/SonicAdventure2 Sonic Adventure]]'' games feature Chao, cute little critters that you can breed and raise. One mini-game includes racing the Chao, and if you win, you unlock an emblem. Along with their regular stats (Swim, Fly, Run, Power and Stamina), in the second game you also have two ''invisible'' stats, Luck and Intelligence. Nothing in the game tells you how to increase these stats, or what they do, leaving many gamers baffled. It turns out Luck prevents Chao from tripping, and Intelligence determines how well they solve puzzles. Good luck figuring that out on your own. Without a guide, you wouldn't even know they existed.
** Chao raising on the original Dreamcast version of both
The games is poorly explained. are not very forthcoming with how you go about doing that and what else you can do with them:
***
You can only see a Chao's stats, give them a name name, and have access to all the different types of fruits -- but only if you transferred them into your VMU via the machine located in every each garden. However, this is Neither game explains this, not explained by even in the games, nor their manuals.\\
manuals. The first game has a monitor in the Station Square garden hinting that different fruits have different effects on the chao, each Chao, but it doesn't explain how to obtain them. There is also a Tikal hint orb which them.
*** Chao have two invisible stats, Luck and Intelligence. Nothing in either game
tells you how to increase these states, or what they do, leaving many gamers baffled. They're important, though -- Luck prevents Chao from tripping (useful when racing them), and Intelligence helps them solve puzzles. In the player that animals can change the second game, a Chao's appearance, but omits the fact that it also affects the chao's stats.\\
The second game's
Luck and Intelligence stats can only be raised through the VMU, the former VMU -- Luck through a mini game about picking a jack-in-a-box, minigame, and the latter Intelligence by feeding the chao Chao a special fruit only obtainable on the VMU. If Not only is this not explained to you, but you didn't have a VMU, you would never wouldn't be able to raise these important stats if you didn't have a VMU.
*** In the first game, a Tikal hint orb will tell the plays that animals can change a Chao's appearance, but it won't tell you that the also affect a Chao's
stats.



* Like most Sonic games, ''VideoGame/{{Sonic Advance|Trilogy}} 2'''s true ending can only be seen if you collect all 7 Chaos Emeralds. However, to get to the Special Stage to even attempt to get a Chaos Emerald, you had to collect all 7 of the Special Rings hidden through a level. Unfortunately, as a later Sonic game, it wasn't really known for its exploration and most players would end up running right past them. It doesn't help that backtracking is pretty much impossible and players would either have to memorize an entire level to get them or get the game guide with the detailed maps. And you lose the rings you got if you die. GuideDangIt indeed...
* ''VideoGame/{{Sonic Rush|Series}} Adventure'': As opposed to nearly every other hidden island that is hinted at where there is shallow water, there are two that you may have to scour the entire sea map for, as there is no sign that they're at the very top of the map, far away from any other island. Also, ThatOneBoss Ghost Titan has one of the most absurd strategies behind it ''ever''.
* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' had many omissions in the game manual; the game was [[ChristmasRushed severely rushed]], so several of the things in the manual weren't actually in the game. In Shadow's Kingdom Valley, in one section you play as Rouge, and have to find 3 keys, 2 of which are relatively easy to find. One of them, however, is in a tower, which you can only get into by climbing the tower and breaking one of the stained glass windows by planting a bomb on it. Sounds simple, right? The problem is, Rouge's bomb-planting move isn't listed anywhere in the game manual, and the game itself doesn't even mention that specific move. Before this point, you most likely won't even realize that you even ''have'' that bomb-planting move, let alone know how to execute it.
* To reach the Robotizer in Zone 1 of Wacky Workbench in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehogCD'', you must stand on a block that looks like a [[SmashingHallwayTrapsOfDoom crusher]] and let it slam you against the ceiling. Rather than crush you, it drops you into a secret area (although it looks very similar to the ''real'' SmashingHallwayTrapsOfDoom found later in Metallic Madness). Considering there is no way in game to know before hand the "crusher" is actually a transporter, let alone one that would take you to the Robotizer, the only way you could have found this out without looking it up would be [[LuckBasedMission sheer dumb luck]].

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* Like most Sonic games, ''VideoGame/{{Sonic Advance|Trilogy}} 2'''s true ending can only be seen if you collect all 7 seven Chaos Emeralds. However, to get to the Special Stage to even attempt to get a Chaos Emerald, you had have to collect all 7 seven of the Special Rings hidden through a in any given level. Unfortunately, as a later Sonic ''Sonic'' game, it wasn't really known for its exploration exploration, and most players would end up running right past them. It doesn't help that backtracking is pretty much impossible impossible, and players would either have to memorize an entire level to get them or get the game guide with the detailed maps. And you lose the rings you got if you die. GuideDangIt indeed...
die.
* ''VideoGame/{{Sonic Rush|Series}} Adventure'': As opposed to nearly every other hidden island that is hinted at island, where there is shallow water, water will hint at its location, there are two that you may have to scour require scouring the entire sea map for, as there is no sign that they're to find. They're at the very top of the map, far away from any other island. Also, ThatOneBoss Ghost Titan has one of the most absurd strategies behind it ''ever''.
island, and there's no sign that they're up there.
* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' had many omissions in the game manual; the game was [[ChristmasRushed severely rushed]], so several of the things in the manual weren't actually in the game. In Shadow's Kingdom Valley, in one section But sometimes there are things you play as Rouge, and ''can'' do that you would have to find 3 keys, 2 of which are relatively easy to find. One of them, however, is in a tower, which you can only get into by climbing the tower and breaking one of the stained glass windows by planting a bomb on it. Sounds simple, right? The problem is, no idea was even possible. Rouge's bomb-planting move isn't listed is the most infamous, as it's not mentioned anywhere in the game manual, and (and it's necessary to clear one section of Shadow's Kingdom Valley, as you have to find one of the game itself doesn't even mention that specific move. Before this point, you most likely won't even realize that you even ''have'' that bomb-planting move, let alone know how to execute it.
three keys by bombing a stained-glass window).
* To reach the Robotizer in Zone 1 of Wacky Workbench in In ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehogCD'', to reach the Robotizer in Zone 1 of Wacky Workbench, you must stand on a block that looks like a [[SmashingHallwayTrapsOfDoom crusher]] and let it slam you against the ceiling. Rather than crush you, it drops you into a secret area (although it looks very similar to the ''real'' SmashingHallwayTrapsOfDoom found later in Metallic Madness). Considering there is no way in game to know before hand beforehand that the "crusher" is actually a transporter, let alone one that would take you to the Robotizer, the only way you could have found this out without looking it up would be [[LuckBasedMission sheer dumb luck]].



* While most of the ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' games are generally easy, there's always one or two Star Coins per game placed in extremely counterintuitive places that pretty much either require the player to be psychic or use a walkthrough to figure out. Some of the worst ones included:
** Any levels with invisible blocks leading to secret areas. The worst one is probably world 5-1 in ''[[VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros2 NSMB2]]'' and its invisible block hidden in a bonus room, which in turn leads to the secret exit and two additional levels.
** Anything hidden behind a fake wall which vanishes when you touch it. To find the ones in a certain underwater level and Wendy's Tower in World 4 of ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' is basically down to luck/trial and error. Bonus points if they're hidden behind a fake wall with breakable blocks in the way, [[FakeDifficulty which make the wall seem solid even when it's not]].
** The second Star Coin of World 1 Tower in ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros2'', where the coin only appears when a switch pressed in the lower part of the room is active, and the game doesn't even hint at there being an upper portion. Made worse by the fact an obvious reward in the form of temporary coins is located in the same room as the switch, causing some people not to even bother thinking to climb/fly upwards.
** The second Star Coin in 6-5 of ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU'' is hidden ''above'' the level; you must swing on a chain and jump into the sky in a place where there is no ceiling, which warps you to a bonus room.
*** And the second one in 2-4 is one of the aforementioned invisible block secrets. There is absolutely ''nothing'' to suggest that there might be an invisible block above that particular sand spout.
*** The World 4 Ghost House, meanwhile, could be an example of this trope in its entirety. Secret exit? Star Coins? Heck, this is possibly the only level in a ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' game where the NORMAL exit is hard to find.
** In one of the ghost houses in the first game, there's a star coin in a hidden room but you can only get to that room if you stand on a certain block and jump while crouching to hit an invisible block.
** Finding secret exits in the Mario series can be a challenge on its own, but in ''VideoGame/NewSuperLuigiU'', 2 of them are found by ground pounding completely normal looking ground, because it turns out that ground is actually made of Brick Blocks that are obscuring a fake wall.

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* While most of the ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' games are generally easy, there's always one or two Star Coins per game placed in extremely counterintuitive places that pretty much either require the player to either be a psychic or use a walkthrough to figure out. walkthrough. Some of the worst ones included:
include:
** Any levels with invisible blocks leading to secret areas. The worst one is probably world World 5-1 in ''[[VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros2 NSMB2]]'' and its invisible block hidden in a bonus room, which in turn leads to the secret exit and two additional levels.
** Anything hidden behind a fake wall which vanishes when you touch it. To find the ones in a certain underwater level and Wendy's Tower in World 4 of ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' is basically down to luck/trial trial and error. Bonus points if they're Some are even hidden behind a fake wall with breakable blocks in the way, [[FakeDifficulty which make the wall seem solid even when it's not]].
** The second Star Coin of World 1 Tower in ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros2'', where the coin only appears when a switch pressed in the lower part of the room is active, and the game doesn't even hint at there being an upper portion. Made worse by portion of the fact an obvious reward in the form of room. What's worse, there are also some temporary coins is located hidden in that room, making players think they've already found the same room as the switch, causing room's reward and not think to explore some people not to even bother thinking to climb/fly upwards.
more.
** The second Star Coin in World 6-5 of ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU'' is hidden ''above'' the level; you must swing on a chain and jump into the sky in a place where there is no ceiling, which warps you to a bonus room.
*** And the second one in 2-4 is one of the aforementioned invisible block secrets. There is absolutely ''nothing'' to suggest that there might be an invisible block above that particular sand spout.
***
** The World 4 Ghost House, meanwhile, could be an example of this trope House in its entirety. Secret exit? ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU'' is one big GuideDangIt. Forget secret exits and Star Coins? Heck, Coins; this is possibly the only level in a any ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBros'' game where you'll need a guide to find the NORMAL exit is hard to find.
''regular'' exit.
** In one of the ghost houses in the first game, there's a star coin Star Coin in a hidden room but which you can only get to that room reach if you stand on a certain block and jump while crouching to hit an invisible block.
** Finding secret exits in the Mario ''Mario'' series can be a challenge on its own, but in ''VideoGame/NewSuperLuigiU'', 2 two of them are found by ground pounding completely normal looking ground, because it turns out that ground is actually made of Brick Blocks that are obscuring a fake wall.



** Some stars involve hunting for five "secrets". These secrets include hitting a random ! Block, standing in a specific spot and pushing a box. These things do nothing in any other mission in the level and only by selecting the "Five Secrets" mission will they do anything.
** The first slide level in the game actually has ''two'' Stars. The first one you can get just by beating it normally... the second one you can only get [[spoiler:by beating it within 21 seconds]].

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** Some stars involve hunting for five "secrets". These secrets include hitting a random ! [!] Block, standing in a specific spot spot, and pushing a box. These things do nothing in any other mission in the level level, and only by selecting the "Five Secrets" mission will they do anything.
anything at all.
** The first slide level in the game actually has ''two'' Stars. The first one you can get just by beating it normally... the normally. The second one you can only get [[spoiler:by beating it within 21 seconds]].



** A strategy guide mentioned that one could get a Warp Whistle by dropping through a floating white block in stage 1-3 and then running behind the ending curtain. Only one problem: The guide didn't specify ''how'' to drop down, and holding down the 'down' button for several seconds isn't something that's immediately obvious.

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** A strategy guide mentioned that one could get a Warp Whistle by dropping through a floating white block in stage 1-3 and then running behind the ending curtain. Only one problem: The guide didn't specify ''how'' to drop down, and holding down the 'down' down button for several seconds isn't something that's immediately obvious.



** The last whistle is on world two, the desert, and you have to break a rock that was delicately placed to blend into the background. Without seeing something like ''Film/TheWizard'', your only clue is to TryEverything (because up until that point you aren't told what the Hammer actually ''does'', and there's no penalty for trying the Hammer on every square).
** It's not required for anything useful beyond a few [[OneUp Extra Lives]], but getting the Treasure Ship to appear (or even knowing that it exists) is not something most people would ever figure out on their own. An unknowing player might even trigger one by accident, unsure of what they even did.[[note]]To elaborate, one must finish a level in World 1, 3, 5 or 6 with an amount of coins that is a multiple of 11 (not counting zero), as well as having the tens column of their score match said multiple. So for example, finishing a level with 33 coins and a score of 20,430 points would trigger the Treasure Ship. Note that the Treasure Ship replaces one of the Hammer Bros. on the map, so the ship cannot be triggered if there are none remaining. Also, only one Treasure Ship can be triggered per applicable world.[[/note]]
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2''
** They barely mention Grandmaster Galaxy or how to unlock it. They also never hint at where any of the Green Stars are. For the ones that aren't sort of hidden in plain sight or just out of vision but still audible, good luck finding them.
** Here's a fun example from the fifth boss galaxy. The second Green Star can only be found by [[spoiler:shooting out of the cannon on the blue and purple sphere planet not toward the next planet, but really far and up to the left. The Star is about 20 seconds away and can only barely be seen by its twinkle]].

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** The last whistle is on world two, in World 2, the desert, and you have to break a rock that was that's delicately placed to blend into the background. Without seeing something like ''Film/TheWizard'', your only clue is to TryEverything (because up until that point you aren't told what the Hammer actually ''does'', and there's no penalty for trying the Hammer on every square).
** It's not required for anything useful beyond a few [[OneUp Extra Lives]], extra lives]], but getting the Treasure Ship to appear (or even knowing that it exists) is not something most people would ever figure out on their own. An unknowing player might even trigger one by accident, unsure of what they even did.[[note]]To elaborate, one [[labelnote:To elaborate:]]One must finish a level in World 1, 3, 5 5, or 6 with an amount of coins that is a multiple of 11 (not counting zero), as well as having the tens column of their score match said multiple. So So, for example, finishing a level with 33 coins and a score of 20,430 points would trigger the Treasure Ship. Note that the Treasure Ship replaces one of the Hammer Bros. on the map, so the ship cannot be triggered if there are none remaining. Also, only one Treasure Ship can be triggered per applicable world.[[/note]]
[[/labelnote]]
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2''
''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'':
** They barely mention Grandmaster Galaxy or is barely mentioned at all, let alone how to unlock it. They There's also never no hint at of where any of the Green Stars are. For the ones that aren't sort of hidden in plain sight or It's especially infuriating when you can barely hear them but they're just out of vision but still audible, good luck finding them.
sight.
** Here's a fun example from In the fifth boss galaxy. The galaxy, the second Green Star can only be found by [[spoiler:shooting out of the cannon on the blue and purple sphere planet not toward the next planet, but really far and up to the left. left]]. The Star is about [[spoiler:about 20 seconds away and can only barely be seen by its twinkle]].



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' has a few levels where you race against a clone of Mario. The game never hints that there is a speed boost you can get at the start of the races by holding forward, holding Z after 2 appears and then press A as soon as the countdown finishes. This is practically required in the races against Cosmic Luigi.
* Due to the large number of Power Moons in the game and the open world setup of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'', there are tons of examples of Power Moon placements which are insanely tricky to find or get. Some of the most over the top include:
** The Moon at the start of the cave section in the Moon Kingdom. It's really high up on the wall above the pipe, with no obvious way of getting there. How is the player supposed to get it? Take a Banzai Bill all the way from the end of the level back to the start, hoping it doesn't run out before that ledge (and there's basically no room for error here at all).
** Quite a few Moons found by the dogs in the game come into this category too. That's because the locations aren't marked at all until the dog starts digging, and the one with a Moon (rather than a few coins or a heart) can be a completely nondescript patch of land miles from where the dog initially appears.
** A few more Moons are found on platforms covered by fog in bonus areas, like the one accessed by having Yoshi eat a fruit blocking a pipe in the Mushroom Kingdom. Some give off a tiny glow that's easy to miss, but others are literally 'drop down, trust there's ground there'.
** There's also the second Goombette Moon in the Sand Kingdom. Normally she'd be on a platform the player has to reach with a Goomba stack, but in this case she's literally at the very edge of the level hundreds of metres away from anything else. This means that not only is she easy to miss herself, but once they find her location, they have to bring a Goomba all the way from the other side of the level to actually get said Power Moon.
** But the trickiest one to find in the entire game has to be the Moon hidden in the Cap Kingdom's pushing blocks bonus level. [[http://twitter.com/ThAshleyChannel/status/924363444744216576 That's because it's inside a compartment in the back of one of the blocks you'll jump across]], and unless you decide to randomly turn back at just the right point, it's incredibly easy to miss.
** An entire section of the Wooded Kingdom known as the Deep Woods requires jumping off a cliff, which would normally kill you. You can't teleport while in the section, suggesting that it serves as a kind of penalty area, but several moons and transformations are only available there.
** Speaking of the Deep Woods, one of the Moons found there involves Capturing the nearby Coin Coffer and using it to fire 500 coins at a nondescript sapling. It will likely take even more because of the precision required. Your only hints are five fossilized coins near the sapling and (if you're lucky to buy a marker from the Hint Toad) a marker in the Deep Woods.
** One of Mario's {{Idle Animation}}s involves sitting down if left on a seat, something you will likely only find by accident. There is only one instance in the entire game where this is actually useful: "Bench Friends", the Metro Kingdom sidequest with the depressed man sitting on the bench; doing this animation rewards a Power Moon. One could spend hundreds of hours and never figure this one.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' has a few levels where you race against a clone of Mario. The game never hints that there is a speed boost you can get at the start of the races -- kinda like in ''VideoGame/MarioKart'', but with a less intuitive process: start by holding forward, holding then hold Z after 2 appears and when the countdown hits 2, then press A as soon as the countdown finishes. This is practically required in the races against Cosmic Luigi.
* Due to the large number of Power Moons in the game and the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'' has a big open world setup of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'', there are tons of examples with a lot of Power Moon placements Moons, many of which are insanely tricky to find or get. Some obtain. Here are some of the most over the top include:
craziest:
** The Moon at the start of the cave section in the Moon Kingdom. It's Kingdom is really high up on the wall above the pipe, with no obvious way of getting there. How is the player supposed to You get it? Take it by taking a Banzai Bill all the way from the end of the level back to the start, hoping it doesn't run out of steam before you hit that ledge (and there's ledge. It also leaves you with basically no room for error here at all).
error.
** Quite a few Moons found by the dogs in the game come into this category too. That's because the locations aren't marked at all until the dog starts digging, and the one with a Moon (rather than a few coins or a heart) can be a completely nondescript patch of land miles from where the dog initially appears.
** A few more Moons are found on platforms covered by fog in bonus areas, like the one accessed by having Yoshi eat a fruit blocking a pipe in the Mushroom Kingdom. Some give off a tiny glow that's easy to miss, but others are literally 'drop "drop down, trust there's ground there'.
there".
** There's also the The second Goombette Moon in the Sand Kingdom. Normally Kingdom is hard to get. Normally, she'd be on a platform the player has to reach with a Goomba stack, but in this case she's literally at the very edge of the level hundreds of metres far away from anything else. This means that not only is she easy to miss herself, but once they you find her location, they you have to bring a Goomba all the way from the other side of the level to actually get said Power Moon.
** But The Moon hidden in the Cap Kingdom's block-pushing bonus level may be the trickiest one to find in the entire game has to be the Moon hidden in the Cap Kingdom's pushing blocks bonus level. game. It's [[http://twitter.com/ThAshleyChannel/status/924363444744216576 That's because it's inside a compartment in the back of one of the blocks you'll you jump across]], and unless across]]. Unless you randomly decide to randomly turn back at just the right point, spot, it's incredibly easy to miss.
** An entire section of the Wooded Kingdom known as the Deep Woods requires jumping off a cliff, which would normally kill you. You can't teleport while in the section, suggesting that it serves as a kind of penalty area, but several moons and transformations are only available there.
** Speaking
there. One of the Deep Woods, one of the those Moons found there involves Capturing capturing the nearby Coin Coffer and using it to fire 500 coins at a nondescript sapling. It will likely take even more because of the precision required. Your sapling marked only hints are by five fossilized coins near the sapling and (if you're lucky to buy a marker from the Hint Toad) a marker in the Deep Woods.
(and you'll likely need more than 500 unless your aim is perfect).
** One of Mario's {{Idle Animation}}s involves sitting down if left on a seat, something you will likely only find by accident. There is only one instance in the entire game where this is actually useful: "Bench Friends", the Metro Kingdom sidequest with the depressed man sitting on the bench; doing bench. Doing this animation rewards a Power Moon. One could spend hundreds of hours and never figure this one.



** Good luck finding all the regional (purple) coins. The various hint systems can help with Power Moons but getting hints for the regional coins requires using a [[BribingYourWayToVictory Bowser]] Toys/{{Amiibo}}.
** The various "Found with (KINGDOM) Art" Moons that require using hint art sign posts and backtracking to find. Many of the Hint Art Moons are easy enough to solve, but some of them are so vague that it could take days to figure them out.

to:

** Good luck finding all the regional (purple) coins. The various hint systems can help with Power Moons Moons, but getting hints for the regional coins requires using a [[BribingYourWayToVictory Bowser]] Toys/{{Amiibo}}.
** The various "Found with (KINGDOM) Art" Moons that require using hint art sign posts Hint Art signposts and backtracking to find.find them. Many of the Hint Art Moons are easy enough to solve, but some of them are so vague that it could take days to figure them out.



** Blue Coins, 10 of which equal 1 Shine Sprite in an exchange with an NPC, are this. While they are not needed to beat the game, they will drive 100% completionists batty as they will search every nook and cranny, squirt water at anything that moves or doesn't move, and do all this for '''EVERY EPISODE IN EVERY LEVEL'''.
** One of the secret Shine Sprites in Pianta Village can only be found if you stand on the platform atop the tallest tree, look straight up, and ''spray water at the sun''. After you spray it, a Shine will pop out.
** In another mission in the same area, you need to find a certain point and spray water at the ''moon'' for a Blue Coin. Both of these are hinted at by a villager, but who talks to them? The villager mentions exactly what you have to do with the moon in Episode 5 (and only in episode 5) but the only hint about what to do with the sun would be the same person mentioning the sun in the same manner; she only does this in Episode 8.
** At least two secret Shine Sprites can only be found by spraying normal looking SAND in random places with water.
** Shine Sprites are acquired by collecting 100 coins in each level, including the hub. The game fails to say that not all episodes in a level have 100 coins. You ''also'' don't have the added benefit of blue coins equalling five gold coins, since they serve a different purpose entirely in this game (see above).
** A few secret Shine Sprites involve going into places with yellow birds, and spraying them until they transform into Shine Sprites. There is absolutely NO indication that you ever need to do this.
*** Once you've figured out the general pattern (spraying blue birds with water gets you Blue Coins, spraying yellow birds gets you Shine Sprites, and in one level, spraying a red bird gets you a Red Coin), you can find all of the related secrets pretty easily. It still counts as a GuideDangIt, however, because nowhere in the game is it ever indicated that spraying birds with water has any kind of point to it.
** Other Blue Coin Guide Dang Its: Yoshi can eat the bees that emerge from the beehives in certain levels. This in itself is something that a player is likely to discover. However, you can get a Blue Coin by knocking down the beehive by spraying or jumping on it and then having Yoshi eat all ''those'' bees as well, which is ''not'' something that's likely to occur to the average player (in part because [[ViolationOfCommonSense knocking down a beehive seems like it would be a bad idea]]).
** In Ricco Harbor, you have to spray a normal-looking solid wall by the lighthouse in order to make a blue Shine Sprite symbol appear, which then yields a blue coin. It is not hinted at, and the only way to likely find it without a guide is by spraying said wall entirely on accident or while messing around.
** Sirena Beachís third shine, Mysterious Hotel Delfino. The goal involves getting Yoshi so you can get past enemies Mario canít defeat. Problem is, he only wants pineapples, which the fruit stand (in)conveniently doesnít have. In order to find some pineapples, you have to navigate this maze of a hotel by doing some very counterintuitive actions that the guests only give you the vaguest clues about. Just finding the first step in this mission can be hell for a first-timer.

to:

** Blue Coins, 10 ten of which equal 1 one Shine Sprite in an exchange with an NPC, are this. tend to be hard to find. While they are not needed to beat the game, they will drive 100% completionists batty {{Hundred Percent Completion}}ists batty, as they will search every nook and cranny, squirt water at anything that moves or doesn't move, and do all this for '''EVERY EPISODE IN EVERY LEVEL'''.
every episode in every level.
** One of the secret Shine Sprites in Pianta Village can only be found if you stand on the platform atop the tallest tree, look straight up, and ''spray spray water at ''at the sun''. After you spray it, a Shine will pop out.
** In another
out. Another mission in the same area, area requires you need to find a certain point different spot and spray water at the ''moon'' for a Blue Coin. Both of ''moon''. A villager hints at these are hinted at by a villager, but (and who talks to them? The villager mentions exactly what you have to do with villagers anyway?), but only obliquely -- she only talks about the moon in Episode 5 (and only in episode 5) but the only hint about what to do with and the sun would be the same person mentioning the sun in the same manner; she only does this in Episode 8.
** At least two secret Shine Sprites can only be found by spraying normal looking SAND ''sand'' in random places with water.
** Shine Sprites are acquired by collecting 100 coins in each level, including the hub. The game fails to say that not all episodes in a level have 100 coins. You ''also'' also don't have the added benefit of blue coins equalling five gold coins, since they serve a different purpose entirely in this game.
** The
game (see above).
** A few secret Shine Sprites involve going
utterly fails to tell you that you can get goodies if you go into certain places with certain birds and spray them with water. Blue birds will transform into Blue Coins, yellow birds, and spraying them until they birds transform into Shine Sprites. There is absolutely NO indication Sprites, and red birds transform into Red Coins (but that you ever need to do this.
***
only happens once). Once you've figured you figure out the general pattern (spraying blue birds with water gets you Blue Coins, spraying yellow birds gets you Shine Sprites, and in one level, spraying a red bird gets you a Red Coin), pattern, though, you can find all of the related secrets pretty easily. It still counts as a GuideDangIt, however, because nowhere in the game is it ever indicated that spraying birds with water has any kind of point to it.
easily.
** Other Blue Coin Guide Dang Its: Yoshi can eat the bees that emerge from the beehives in certain levels. This in itself is something that a player is likely to discover. However, you can get a Blue Coin by knocking down the beehive by spraying or by jumping on it and then having Yoshi eat all ''those'' bees as well, which is ''not'' also something that's not likely to occur to the average player (in part because [[ViolationOfCommonSense knocking down a beehive seems like it would be a bad idea]]).
** In Ricco Harbor, you have to spray a normal-looking solid wall by the lighthouse in order to make a blue Shine Sprite symbol appear, which then yields a blue coin. It is not hinted at, and the only likely way to likely find it without a guide is by just randomly spraying said wall entirely on accident or while messing around.
the wall.
** Sirena Beachís Beach's third shine, Mysterious Hotel Delfino. The goal involves Delfino, requires getting Yoshi so you can get past enemies Mario canít defeat. Problem is, he only wants pineapples, which the fruit stand (in)conveniently doesnít have. In order to find some pineapples, you have to navigate this maze of a hotel by doing some very counterintuitive actions that the guests only give you the vaguest clues about. Just finding the first step in this mission can be hell for a first-timer.



** There is a unique example in the form of Chocolate Island 2. Unlike any other level in the game, there is a point in which the layout changes ''based on the time left when the player enters a pipe''. Most players who've gone through the game and weren't going for OneHundredPercentCompletion probably didn't know that there were alternate sections of the level. While the Secret Exit requires you to speed through the first two sections as quickly as possible and get into a pipe with 250 seconds or more on the clock, there are several other rarely-seen sections (like the final non-secret exit one, which has DynamicDifficulty based on how many Dragon Coins were collected in the sections prior to this) that can also trip players up. Your only hint in the game is the message block at the level's start: "Here, the coins you collect or the time remaining can change your progress", which barely explains how it ''works''.

to:

** There is a unique example in the form of Chocolate Island 2. 2 is a unique example: Unlike any other level in the game, there is a point in which the layout changes ''based based on the time left when the player enters a pipe''. pipe. Most players who've gone through the game and weren't going for OneHundredPercentCompletion HundredPercentCompletion probably didn't know that there were alternate sections of the level. While the Secret Exit requires you to speed through the first two sections as quickly as possible and get into a pipe with 250 seconds or more on the clock, there are several other rarely-seen sections (like the final non-secret exit one, which has DynamicDifficulty based on how many Dragon Coins were collected in the sections prior to this) that can also trip players up. Your only hint in the game is the message block at the level's start: "Here, the coins you collect or the time remaining can change your progress", which barely explains how it ''works''.


** The first slide level in the game actually has ''two'' Stars. The first one you can get just by beating it normally... the second one you can only get [[spoiler:by beating it within 18 seconds]].

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** The first slide level in the game actually has ''two'' Stars. The first one you can get just by beating it normally... the second one you can only get [[spoiler:by beating it within 18 21 seconds]].


* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]]) most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them, or how many they've even completed. Even players following a walkthrough will have to keep track of which ones they've completed all on their own as there's ''no'' in-game way of knowing if you've completed a Skill Point challenge.

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* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]]) most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them, or how many they've even completed. Even players following a walkthrough will have to keep track of which ones they've completed all on their own as there's ''no'' in-game way of knowing if you've completed a Skill Point challenge. The ''VideoGame/SpyroReignitedTrilogy'' remakes do have a list of Skill Points accessible from the pause menu, but the descriptions are vague enough to make hunting for them a chore anyway.

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** During the final boss of ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', It's possible to [[spoiler:switch characters by flying past the Finalhazard.]] The game doesn't tell you how to do this, which can be real problematic [[spoiler:if you're running out of rings but can't land a hit.]]


* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]]) most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them, or how many they've even completed. Even players following a walkthrough will have to keep track of which ones they've completed all on their own as there's _no_ in-game way of knowing if you've completed a Skill Point challenge.

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* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]]) most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them, or how many they've even completed. Even players following a walkthrough will have to keep track of which ones they've completed all on their own as there's _no_ ''no'' in-game way of knowing if you've completed a Skill Point challenge.


* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]] so most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them, or how many they've even completed.

to:

* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]] so Villa]]) most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them, or how many they've even completed. Even players following a walkthrough will have to keep track of which ones they've completed all on their own as there's _no_ in-game way of knowing if you've completed a Skill Point challenge.


* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]] so most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them of how many they've even completed.

to:

* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]] so most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them of them, or how many they've even completed.

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* ''VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage'' and ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' have Skill Points, hidden objectives you can complete in various levels that unlock an extra WhereAreTheyNow entry in the Guidebook / Atlas if you collect them all. Unlike every other collectable in the game there is ''no'' hint that these are a thing, no entry in the pause menu, and they don't count for OneHundredPercentCompletion, and as they are very esoteric actions (like destroy all the seaweed in [[VideoGame/Spyro2RiptosRage Aquaria Towers]] or burn all the trees in [[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon Sunny Villa]] so most players likely won't even know they're a thing, while players who happen to stumble across them will have no hints at all where to find the rest of them of how many they've even completed.


** This was even made fun of in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comicbooks]] where the barrel gets destroyed by Omega. After all, why would go through the hell of trying to get passed it when you have a KillerRobot that can just blow up anything in your way?

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** This was even made fun of in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comicbooks]] where the barrel gets destroyed by Omega. After all, why would go through the hell of trying to get passed past it when you have a KillerRobot that can just blow up anything in your way?

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** This was even made fun of in the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie comicbooks]] where the barrel gets destroyed by Omega. After all, why would go through the hell of trying to get passed it when you have a KillerRobot that can just blow up anything in your way?


* In ''VideoGame/CaveStory'', [[TheProfessor Professor Booster]] gets teleported into the Labyrinth by [[TheDragon Misery]]. When the player reaches a certain area, Professor Booster appears in midair and falls a dozen feet, resulting in broken glasses and apparent injury. Getting the [[MultipleEndings good ending]] hinges ''entirely'' on ''not'' talking to him. If you try to help him, he gives you the Booster v0.8 and dies. However, if you leave him to his (apparent) death, a Tow Rope will appear in the Core Room, allowing you to pick up Curly Brace after the battle with the Core and save her life; later on in the game, Professor Booster will inexplicably teleport back into Arthur's House in perfect health *and* with fixed glasses and hand you the Booster v2.0. From this, it can be inferred that talking to Professor Booster '''kills him''', ''and'' somehow causes a piece of rope found at the bottom of a room several stages away to disappear. The only clues given for this puzzle are a note found in a prefab shack right before the final boss, and a broken teleporter underneath the area Professor Booster falls in with the description "a sufficiently skilled electrician might be able to fix this". The former tells of how Professor Booster is working on a jetpack called the Booster, which is currently in version 0.8, [[DoubleUnlock but will be in version 2.0 once he finishes it]]. Of course, by the time you get to this, Professor Booster has either already died or survived and given you the finished Booster 2.0. The latter obviously explains how Professor Booster was able to teleport to Arthur's house, but the pit Professor Booster falls into is so deep that it can only be escaped with the Booster v0.8 he gives you when you talk to him. Therefore, [[UnwinnableByMistake even investigating what happens to him resigns you to the standard ending]]. The only way to avoid this is to either have the [[MoreDakka Machine Gun]] on you ''and'' to have it leveled up to 3, at which point it [[RecoilBoost propels you into the air when fired downwards]], or make the pixel-perfect jump from the one tiny red spot before the chasm. Altogether, this all [[GuideDangIt makes getting the good ending (or even knowing of its existence) without consulting a wiki nigh impossible except by accident]].

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* In ''VideoGame/CaveStory'', there is a small room in the labyrinth with a wide gap between the entrance and exit. When the player enters, [[TheProfessor Professor Booster]] gets is suddenly teleported into the Labyrinth by [[TheDragon Misery]]. When the player reaches a certain area, Professor Booster appears room in midair and falls offscreen. If you go down to talk to him, he gives you the the Booster v0.8, a dozen feet, resulting in broken glasses jetpack that allows you to easily reach the next room, and apparent injury. Getting dies. However, getting the [[MultipleEndings good ending]] hinges ''entirely'' on ''not'' talking to him. him, and instead making the difficult jump across the gap on the first try; if you fall, [[UnwinnableByMistake you can't get back up without the Booster]] (unless you happen to have gotten and fully leveled the [[MoreDakka Machine Gun]]). This is made somewhat easier by a subtle mark on the ground at the spot you have to jump from, but it's easy to miss. If you try to help him, he gives you make the Booster v0.8 jump and dies. However, if you leave him the professor to his (apparent) death, a Tow Rope will appear in the Core Room, allowing you to pick up Curly Brace after the battle with the Core and save her life; life (although several more steps are required for a full recovery); later on in the game, Professor Booster will inexplicably teleport back into Arthur's House somehow appears in perfect health *and* with fixed glasses and hand at Arthur's House, where he hands you the Booster v2.0. From this, it can be inferred It turns out that talking to Professor the professor, having '''not'' given you the Booster '''kills him''', ''and'' somehow causes a piece of rope found yet, finds the strength to make it to the broken teleporter at the bottom of the room, repair it, escape, make a room several stages away to disappear. full recovery, and finish work on a much more powerful version of the Booster. The only clues given for this puzzle are a note found in a prefab shack right before the final boss, and a inspecting the broken teleporter underneath the area Professor Booster falls in with the description to learn "a sufficiently skilled electrician might be able to fix this". The former tells How this causes a piece of how Professor Booster is working on a jetpack called rope found at the Booster, which bottom of a room several stages away to disappear is currently in version 0.8, [[DoubleUnlock not explained, but will be in version 2.0 once he finishes it]]. Of course, by this saves the time you get to this, Professor Booster has either already died or survived and given you player the finished Booster 2.0. The latter obviously explains how Professor Booster was able to teleport to Arthur's house, but trouble of going through the pit Professor Booster falls into is so deep that it can rest of the steps to reach the true final area only be escaped with to find it nearly impossible without the Booster v0.8 he gives you when you talk to him. Therefore, [[UnwinnableByMistake even investigating what happens to him resigns you to the standard ending]]. The only way to avoid this is to either have the [[MoreDakka Machine Gun]] on you ''and'' to have v2.0, and makes it leveled up to 3, at which point it [[RecoilBoost propels you into the air when fired downwards]], or make the pixel-perfect jump from the one tiny red spot before the chasm.slightly more obvious that something was missed. Altogether, this all [[GuideDangIt makes getting the good ending (or even knowing of its existence) without consulting a wiki nigh impossible except by accident]].

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