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This is the third major film adaptation of the story, following the American versions of [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1923 1923]] and [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1939 1939]], and is most noted for being TruerToTheText, even keeping Hugo's original DownerEnding intact. It's also the first adaptation in colors.

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This is the The third major film adaptation of the story, story following the American versions of [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1923 1923]] and [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1939 1939]], 1939]] and the first in colors, it is most noted for being TruerToTheText, even keeping Hugo's original DownerEnding intact. It's also the first adaptation in colors.
intact.


* GoOutWithASmile: Esmeralda's last words are "C'est beau, la vie" ("Life is wonderful").


This is the third major film adaptation of the story, following the American versions of [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1923 1923]] and [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1939 1939]], and is most noted for being TruerToTheText, even keeping Hugo's original DownerEnding intact. It's also the first adaptation to be in colors.

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This is the third major film adaptation of the story, following the American versions of [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1923 1923]] and [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1939 1939]], and is most noted for being TruerToTheText, even keeping Hugo's original DownerEnding intact. It's also the first adaptation to be in colors.


''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' is a French-Italian 1956 screen version of [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame the novel]] by Creator/VictorHugo. Produced by Paris Film Productions and Panitalia, it featured Creator/AnthonyQuinn as Quasimodo and Creator/GinaLollobrigida as Esmeralda.

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''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' is a French-Italian 1956 screen version film adaptation of [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame the novel]] by Creator/VictorHugo. Produced by Paris Film Productions and Panitalia, it featured Creator/AnthonyQuinn as Quasimodo and Creator/GinaLollobrigida as Esmeralda.


%% * GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming and persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the future, please check the trope page to make sure your example fits the current definition.

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%% * GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The English version never ''says'' that Frollo is a priest, because that would violate [[https://productioncode.dhwritings.com/multipleframes_productioncode.php Section VIII of the Hays Code]]. However, he does live in a cathedral and persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this wear robes that look like they could be priest's robes. He's identified onscreen as an alchemist, but he did practice alchemy on the side in the future, please check original novel. All in all, it seems like the trope page filmmakers are trying to make sure your example fits it so that the current definition.audience will infer that he's a priest, but without tipping off the censors.


* AdaptationalJobChange: This time, Frollo is an alchemist... who lives in Notre Dame for some reason. See GettingCrapPastTheRadar.

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* AdaptationalJobChange: This time, Frollo is an alchemist... who lives in Notre Dame for some reason. See GettingCrapPastTheRadar.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The movie never ''says'' that Frollo is a priest in the American version, but he does live in a cathedral and wear robes that look like they could be priest's robes. He's identified onscreen as an alchemist, but he did practice alchemy on the side in the original novel. All in all, it seems like the filmmakers are trying to make it so that the audience will infer that he's a priest, but without tipping off the censors.

to:

%% * GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The movie never ''says'' that Frollo GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming and persistent misuse, GCPTR is a priest on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the American version, but he does live in a cathedral and wear robes that look like they could be priest's robes. He's identified onscreen as an alchemist, but he did practice alchemy on future, please check the side in the original novel. All in all, it seems like the filmmakers are trying trope page to make it so that sure your example fits the audience will infer that he's a priest, but without tipping off the censors.current definition.


* AmbiguousSituation: Due to her literary counterpart having been an example of AmbiguouslyBrown, it is uncertain if this portrayal of Esmeralda is truly a RaceLift or still an example of Roma by adoption with her backstory having been cut.

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* AmbiguousSituation: AmbiguouslyBrown: Due to her literary counterpart having been an example of AmbiguouslyBrown, it is uncertain if this portrayal of Esmeralda is truly a RaceLift or still an example of Roma by adoption with her backstory having been cut.



* RaceLift: After the ambiguity of the 1939 version, this is the first version in which Esmeralda is no-question-about-it a Gypsy by birth.
* TruerToTheText: This version is the closest to the book. There are a few differences, such as Esmeralda possibly being a Gypsy by birth and Frollo not being explicitly stated to be a priest, but it still follows the original plot beat-for-beat, including the DownerEnding.

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* RaceLift: After the ambiguity of the 1939 version, this is the first version in which Esmeralda is no-question-about-it a Gypsy by birth.
* TruerToTheText: This version is the closest to the book. There are a few differences, such as Esmeralda possibly being a Gypsy by birth and Frollo not being explicitly stated to be a priest, but it still follows the original plot beat-for-beat, including the DownerEnding.

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationDyeJob: Quasimodo is portrayed as black-haired rather than as a redhead.


* AmbiguousSituation: Due to her literary counterpart having been an example of AmbiguouslyBrown, it is uncertain if this portrayal of Esmeralda is truly a RaceLift or still an example of Roma by adoption with her backstory having been cut.



* AmbiguousSituation: Due to her literary counterpart having been an example of AmbiguouslyBrown, it is uncertain if this portrayal of Esmeralda is truly a RaceLift or still an example of Roma by adoption with her backstory having been cut.


* TruerToTheText: This version is the closest to the book. There are a few differences, such as Esmeralda being a Gypsy by birth and Frollo not being explicitly stated to be a priest, but it still follows the original plot beat-for-beat, including the DownerEnding.

to:

* TruerToTheText: This version is the closest to the book. There are a few differences, such as Esmeralda possibly being a Gypsy by birth and Frollo not being explicitly stated to be a priest, but it still follows the original plot beat-for-beat, including the DownerEnding.

Added DiffLines:

* AmbiguousSituation: Due to her literary counterpart having been an example of AmbiguouslyBrown, it is uncertain if this portrayal of Esmeralda is truly a RaceLift or still an example of Roma by adoption with her backstory having been cut.

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalAttractiveness: A downplayed example as Quasimodo is portrayed more realistically and less like a caricature with his back having a small curve in his spine and his face being only slightly deformed.

Added DiffLines:

** Gina Lollobrigida herself is probably also a barefooter, given that she really enjoyed posing to the photographers in her Esmeralda outfit (most of the pictures you would find by googling "Lollobrigida Esmeralda" are off-screen shots rather than actual scenes from the movie), and portrayed two other iconic barefoot characters, namely Maria De Ritis in ''Bread, Love and Dreams'' and Ippolita from ''La bellezza di Ippolita''. Speculation even says that it was the actress' own idea to portray Esmeralda in bare feet, rather than the director's.


Added DiffLines:

* GoOutWithASmile: Esmeralda's last words are "C'est beau, la vie" ("Life is wonderful").


This is the third major film adaptation of the story, following the American versions of [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1923 1923]] and [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1939 1939]], and is most noted for being TruerToTheText, even keeping Hugo's original DownerEnding intact. It's also the first adaptation to be in color.

to:

This is the third major film adaptation of the story, following the American versions of [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1923 1923]] and [[Film/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame1939 1939]], and is most noted for being TruerToTheText, even keeping Hugo's original DownerEnding intact. It's also the first adaptation to be in color.
colors.


* CulturalTranslation: While the French version follows the book and has Quasimodo crowned "Pope of Fools," it's "King of Fools" in the English version in order to comply with UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode. The scene had to be shot twice to accommodate the change in headwear. Additionally, the French version had two scenes that were cut out of the English version.

to:

* CulturalTranslation: While the French version follows the book and has Quasimodo crowned "Pope of Fools," Fools", it's "King of Fools" in the English American version in order to comply with UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode.the Hays Code. The scene had to be shot twice to accommodate the change in headwear. Additionally, the French version had two scenes that were cut out of the English version.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The movie never ''says'' that Frollo is a priest, but he does live in a cathedral and wear robes that look like they could be priest's robes. He's identified onscreen as an alchemist, but he did practice alchemy on the side in the original novel. All in all, it seems like the filmmakers are trying to make it so that the audience will infer that he's a priest, but without tipping off the censors.

to:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The movie never ''says'' that Frollo is a priest, priest in the American version, but he does live in a cathedral and wear robes that look like they could be priest's robes. He's identified onscreen as an alchemist, but he did practice alchemy on the side in the original novel. All in all, it seems like the filmmakers are trying to make it so that the audience will infer that he's a priest, but without tipping off the censors.

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