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Stars JamieLeeCurtis as Lynn Taylor, Amazing Grace's manager and close friend, and Creator/GregoryPeck as the US President. Directed by Mike Newell (''Film/FourWeddingsAndAFuneral'', ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'').

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Stars JamieLeeCurtis Creator/JamieLeeCurtis as Lynn Taylor, Amazing Grace's manager and close friend, and Creator/GregoryPeck as the US President. Directed by Mike Newell (''Film/FourWeddingsAndAFuneral'', ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'').


* ElectiveMute: All the children in the world make a vow of silence in the last act of the movie.



* TheVoiceless: Chuck (and the other children) during the film's third act.


[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/image_724.jpeg]]



Not to be confused with the 2006 film, Film/AmazingGrace.

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Not to be confused with the 2006 film, Film/AmazingGrace.''Film/AmazingGrace''. Or with ''Series/{{Chuck}}'', for that matter.


* GenreSavvy: As soon as Amazing announces why he's leaving basketball, Jeffries warns one of his business partners that this could be a threat, people are sentimental and might actually ''listen'' to this kind of message.


* DirectToVideo: In the UK, as ''[[MarketBasedTitle Silent Voice]]''.


Chuck Murdock is [[TheAllAmericanBoy a 12-year-old boy (and local star little league pitcher) from Montana]] who goes on a field trip to a nuclear missile silo. While there, he becomes unnerved by the sight of the missile and the guide's description of the destructive power of the ICBM. After a nightmare about the missile launching, he stages a protest by walking out rather than pitching in his little league game, to the dismay of his teammates and his father, Russell, none of whom seem to understand why he's suddenly so upset about nuclear weapons.

This story is picked up as a human interest piece by several local papers and comes to the attention of fictional NBA player "Amazing Grace" Smith. The pro-athlete, fascinated by the boy's convictions and dedication, decides to go meet him. After listening to Chuck's explanation about "giving up what he does best" as a form of protest, Amazing decides to follow suit, publicly announcing that he is resigning from basketball (crediting Chuck as his inspiration) until there are no more nuclear weapons. He buys some land in Chuck's town and the two begin an unlikely friendship. They are soon joined in their strike by more and more pro-athletes, who make their movement's base of operations in a renovated barn on Amazing's land. Eventually the movement extends to athletes from other countries and even across the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain.

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Chuck Murdock is [[TheAllAmericanBoy a 12-year-old boy (and local star little league pitcher) from Montana]] (then real-life Little Leaguer Joshua Zuehlke) who goes on a field trip to a nuclear missile silo. While there, he becomes unnerved by the sight of the missile and the guide's description of the destructive power of the ICBM. After a nightmare about the missile launching, he stages a protest by walking out rather than pitching in his little league game, to the dismay of his teammates and his father, Russell, Russell (William L. Petersen), none of whom seem to understand why he's suddenly so upset about nuclear weapons.

This story is picked up as a human interest piece by several local papers and comes to the attention of fictional NBA player "Amazing Grace" Smith.Smith (played by real-life NBA player Alex English, who at the time played for the Denver Nuggets - Amazing plays for the Boston Celtics). The pro-athlete, fascinated by the boy's convictions and dedication, decides to go meet him. After listening to Chuck's explanation about "giving up what he does best" as a form of protest, Amazing decides to follow suit, publicly announcing that he is resigning from basketball (crediting Chuck as his inspiration) until there are no more nuclear weapons. He buys some land in Chuck's town and the two begin an unlikely friendship. They are soon joined in their strike by more and more pro-athletes, who make their movement's base of operations in a renovated barn on Amazing's land. Eventually the movement extends to athletes from other countries and even across the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain.



Stars JamieLeeCurtis as Lynn Taylor, Amazing Grace's manager and close friend.

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Stars JamieLeeCurtis as Lynn Taylor, Amazing Grace's manager and close friend.
friend, and Creator/GregoryPeck as the US President. Directed by Mike Newell (''Film/FourWeddingsAndAFuneral'', ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'').



* AmazingFreakingGrace: One of the titular characters is nicknamed after the song. His friends just call him "Amazing"

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* AmazingFreakingGrace: One of the titular characters is nicknamed after the song. His friends just call him "Amazing""Amazing."



* AsHimself: Boston Celtics then-president Red Auerbach, at the press conference when Amazing quits the team (which prompted one American film critic to wonder if Auerbach would be so relaxed about one of his star players quitting if it was during the NBA playoffs - when the movie was released!).



* {{Deuteragonist}}: [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Amazing Grace and Chuck]]

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* {{Deuteragonist}}: [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Amazing Grace and Chuck]]Chuck]].
* DirectToVideo: In the UK, as ''[[MarketBasedTitle Silent Voice]]''.


* PlatonicLifePartners: Amazing and Lynn. There's a hint of UnresolvedSexualTension in their chemistry, but ultimately they simply care for and love each other as best friends.

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** Part of the friction that develops between Russell and Amazing as the movement picks up steam is because he fears that this swings both ways, with his son Chuck looking up to Amazing more than him. They clear the air during a tense conversation (which is when Amazing admits that he ''is'' jealous of Russell's family) and Russell reconnects with his son on a fishing trip a few days later. After that, the issue is dropped.
* PlatonicLifePartners: Amazing and Lynn. There's She's been his manager since college, and he was her very first client. Lynn talks at one point about how a lot of people assume they are a couple, and there's a hint of UnresolvedSexualTension in their chemistry, but ultimately they simply care for and love each other as best friends.


Chuck Murdock is an all-american 12-year-old boy (and local star little league pitcher) from Montana who goes on a field trip to a nuclear missile silo. While there, he becomes unnerved by the sight of the missile and the guide's description of the destructive power of the ICBM. After a nightmare about the missile launching, he stages a protest by walking out rather than pitching in his little league game, to the dismay of his teammates and his father, Russell, none of whom seem to understand why he's suddenly so upset about nuclear weapons.

to:

Chuck Murdock is an all-american [[TheAllAmericanBoy a 12-year-old boy (and local star little league pitcher) from Montana Montana]] who goes on a field trip to a nuclear missile silo. While there, he becomes unnerved by the sight of the missile and the guide's description of the destructive power of the ICBM. After a nightmare about the missile launching, he stages a protest by walking out rather than pitching in his little league game, to the dismay of his teammates and his father, Russell, none of whom seem to understand why he's suddenly so upset about nuclear weapons.


Added DiffLines:

* TheAllAmericanBoy: Chuck is a prime example. This is part of what makes his initial protest an interesting enough story to garner ''some'' media attention even before Amazing Grace joins him.

Added DiffLines:

* TheVoiceless: Chuck (and the other children) during the film's third act.

Added DiffLines:

* BigBrotherMentor: Amazing to Chuck.


Chuck Murdock is an all-american-boy 12-year-old (and local star little league pitcher) from Montana who goes on a field trip to a nuclear missile silo. While there, he becomes unnerved by the sight of the missile and the guide's description of the destructive power of the ICBM. After a nightmare about the missile launching, he stages a protest by walking out rather than pitching in his little league game, to the dismay of his teammates and his father, Russell, none of whom seem to understand why he's suddenly so upset about nuclear weapons.

to:

Chuck Murdock is an all-american-boy all-american 12-year-old boy (and local star little league pitcher) from Montana who goes on a field trip to a nuclear missile silo. While there, he becomes unnerved by the sight of the missile and the guide's description of the destructive power of the ICBM. After a nightmare about the missile launching, he stages a protest by walking out rather than pitching in his little league game, to the dismay of his teammates and his father, Russell, none of whom seem to understand why he's suddenly so upset about nuclear weapons.



* IronicEcho: When Russell's superior in the reserves is giving the tour of the missile silo, he explains that the soldiers in the control room carry pistols because they have to be sure each man will obey if a launch is ordered, even if it means starting global thermonuclear war. As an example, he mentions that a good man like Chuck's dad might hesitate or refuse, "maybe he can't be trusted". Russell throws this line back in his face later when asked to silence his son, refusing by saying he's probably not the man for that mission ("maybe I can't be trusted")



* ParentalSubstitute: Inverted, with Chuck as a stand-in for Amazing's daughter, who died in a car crash five years earlier along with his wife. If she hadn't, she would be just about the same age as Chuck. Both Lynn and Russell allude to Amazing seeing Chuck this way. Lynn even tells Chuck that part of why Amazing joined him in protest was that he thinks his daughter would have asked him to if she were alive.

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* ParentalSubstitute: Inverted, with Chuck as a stand-in for Amazing's daughter, who died in a car crash five years earlier along with his wife. If she hadn't, she would be just about the same age as Chuck. Both Lynn and Russell allude to Amazing seeing Chuck this way.way (he admits as much to Russell when he brings it up, saying he's "jealous as hell" of Russell's family). Lynn even tells Chuck that part of why Amazing joined him in protest was that he thinks his daughter would have asked him to if she were alive.


* YoungAndInCharge: As much as Chuck looks up to Amazing, the whole group really follows ''his'' lead on any major decisions. In the end, its always up to Chuck when/if/whether the protests will go on or give up.

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* YoungAndInCharge: As much as Chuck looks up to Amazing, the whole group really follows ''his'' lead on any major decisions. In the end, its Its always up to Chuck when/if/whether the protests will go on or give up.up. By the end of the movie, Chuck is able to essentially ''veto'' a a seven-year disarmament treaty between the USSR and the USA because its not good enough. He forces the two world leaders to go back and agree to ''total'' disarmament ''immediately''


* YouthAndInCharge: As much as Chuck looks up to Amazing, the whole group really follows ''his'' lead on any major decisions. In the end, its always up to Chuck when/if/whether the protests will go on or give up.

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* YouthAndInCharge: YoungAndInCharge: As much as Chuck looks up to Amazing, the whole group really follows ''his'' lead on any major decisions. In the end, its always up to Chuck when/if/whether the protests will go on or give up.

Added DiffLines:

* TheHeart: Usually, it would be the kid in this role, reminding the adult leader what is important. But in this case its reversed: Chuck is the leader of the protest movements, Amazing is the Heart.


This story is picked up as a human interest piece by several local papers and comes to the attention of fictional NBA player "Amazing Grace" Smith. The pro-athlete, fascinated by the boy's convictions and dedication, decides to go meet him. After listening to Chuck's explanation about "giving up what he does best" as a form of protest, Amazing decides to follow suit, publicly announcing that he is resigning from basketball (crediting Chuck as his inspiration) until there are no more nuclear weapons. He buys some land in Chuck's town and the two begin an unlikely friendship. They are soon joined in their strike by numerous other pro-athletes, who make their movement's base of operations in a renovated barn on Amazing's land. Eventually the movement extends to athletes from other countries and even across the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain.

to:

This story is picked up as a human interest piece by several local papers and comes to the attention of fictional NBA player "Amazing Grace" Smith. The pro-athlete, fascinated by the boy's convictions and dedication, decides to go meet him. After listening to Chuck's explanation about "giving up what he does best" as a form of protest, Amazing decides to follow suit, publicly announcing that he is resigning from basketball (crediting Chuck as his inspiration) until there are no more nuclear weapons. He buys some land in Chuck's town and the two begin an unlikely friendship. They are soon joined in their strike by numerous other more and more pro-athletes, who make their movement's base of operations in a renovated barn on Amazing's land. Eventually the movement extends to athletes from other countries and even across the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain.



* ShapedLikeItself: The explanation of what a linebacker is, which one of the athletes gives to Chuck's little sister, is simply to point to the [[ScaryBlackMan Mad Dog]], [[TheBigGuy "THAT is a linebacker"]]

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* ShapedLikeItself: The explanation of what a linebacker is, which one of the athletes gives given to Chuck's little sister, sister as she stares at a truly enormous man, is simply to point to the [[ScaryBlackMan Mad Dog]], [[TheBigGuy "THAT is a linebacker"]]



** Referenced again later during the height of the children's silent protest, when the President's aide reports that anti-nuclear sentiment is reaching the point that they are unsure the ''soldiers'' in the control room would obey the order to launch if it were given (and that they might even draw their weapons on each other if it came down to it). At least the Russians are in the same boat according to their intelligence.

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** Referenced again later during the height of the children's silent protest, when the President's aide reports that anti-nuclear sentiment is reaching the point that they are unsure the ''soldiers'' in the control room would obey the order to launch if it were given (and that they might even draw their weapons on each other if it came down to it). At least the Russians are in the same boat according to their intelligence.intelligence.
* YouthAndInCharge: As much as Chuck looks up to Amazing, the whole group really follows ''his'' lead on any major decisions. In the end, its always up to Chuck when/if/whether the protests will go on or give up.

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