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* PortalToThePast: In the novel ''Time Tunnel'', between 1964 and 1804.


Murray Leinster (1896 - 1975) was a prolific author of science fiction whose works include several firsts.

"The Runaway Skyscraper" (1919), his first published SF story, is one of the first works in which a location or structure and all its inhabitants are transported to an earlier point in history. "Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "Literature/FirstContact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.

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Murray Leinster (1896 - 1975) was the pen name of William F. Jenkins, a prolific author of science fiction whose career spanned from the 1910s to the 1970s.

His
works include several firsts.

firsts. "The Runaway Skyscraper" (1919), his first published SF story, is one of the first works in which a location or structure and all its inhabitants are transported to an earlier point in history. "Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "Literature/FirstContact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.
Internet.

Leinster also wrote several TieInNovel s based on the 1960s TV series ''Series/TheTimeTunnel'' and ''Series/LandOfTheGiants''.

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[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/murray_leinster.jpg]]

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* TechnologyMarchesOn:
** In "The Skit-Tree Planet", the exploration advance team carry a film camera to record things they'll want to look at again later, and a television camera for transmitting vision back to base. It's taken for granted that these two processes can't be combined in a single camera set-up.
** Much of "A Logic Named Joe" is an impressive avoidance of this trope; it predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.


Leinster won a HugoAward for his 1956 novelette "Exploration Team", and "First Contact" was awarded a Retro-Hugo[[note]](the Retro-Hugos honor works that might have won Hugos if there had been Hugos at the time)[[/note]] in 1996. The Sidewise Award for Alternate History, established in 1995, is named after "Sidewise in Time".

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Leinster won a HugoAward UsefulNotes/HugoAward for his 1956 novelette "Exploration Team", and "First Contact" was awarded a Retro-Hugo[[note]](the Retro-Hugos honor works that might have won Hugos if there had been Hugos at the time)[[/note]] in 1996. The Sidewise Award for Alternate History, established in 1995, is named after "Sidewise in Time".


* TechnologyMarchesOn: In "The Skit-Tree Planet", the exploration advance team carry a film camera to record things they'll want to look at again later, and a television camera for transmitting vision back to base. It's taken for granted that these two processes can't be combined in a single camera set-up.


"Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "Literature/FirstContact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.

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"The Runaway Skyscraper" (1919), his first published SF story, is one of the first works in which a location or structure and all its inhabitants are transported to an earlier point in history. "Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "Literature/FirstContact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.


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* MassTeleportation: One of the earliest examples of the transported-through-time version is "The Runaway Skyscraper", from 1919, in which a Manhattan tower block and its 2000 inhabitants are transported millennia into the past.


* ''Literature/FirstContact''

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* ''Literature/FirstContact''"Literature/FirstContact"



** In "First Contact", FTL travel is only possible in a perfect vacuum. At the time, many astrophysicists believed that interstellar space was completely particle-free, which later turned out not to be the case.



* FirstContact: ''Literature/FirstContact''



* NoWarpingZone: When ''Literature/FirstContact'' was published, many astronomers believed that outer space was a perfect vacuum. The human-piloted starship in that story could only travel faster-than-light in a ''total'' vacuum -- even the slightest wisp of atmosphere or nebula would be enough to prevent it.



* UniversalTranslator: ''First Contact''


"Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "First Contact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.

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"Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "First Contact" "Literature/FirstContact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.



* Literature/MedShip

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* Literature/MedShip''Literature/MedShip''
* ''Literature/FirstContact''



* FirstContact: "First Contact"

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* FirstContact: "First Contact"''Literature/FirstContact''



* NoWarpingZone: When "First Contact" was published, many astronomers believed that outer space was a perfect vacuum. The human-piloted starship in that story could only travel faster-than-light in a ''total'' vacuum -- even the slightest wisp of atmosphere or nebula would be enough to prevent it.

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* NoWarpingZone: When "First Contact" ''Literature/FirstContact'' was published, many astronomers believed that outer space was a perfect vacuum. The human-piloted starship in that story could only travel faster-than-light in a ''total'' vacuum -- even the slightest wisp of atmosphere or nebula would be enough to prevent it.



* UniversalTranslator: "First Contact"

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* UniversalTranslator: "First Contact"''First Contact''


"Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "First Contact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.

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"Sidewise in Time" (1934) has a claim as the first science fiction story featuring alternate histories, and also the first AlternateHistory story specifically to ask that perennial favorite question, ''[[TheAmericanCivilWar ''[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar What if the South won?]]''. "First Contact" (1945) has a claim to first UniversalTranslator and first use of "FirstContact" as the term for two alien races meeting. "A Logic Named Joe" (1946) predicts the use of home computers and depicts a public computer network very similar to the Internet.



* AlternateHistory: In "Sidewise in Time", a mysterious cataclysm causes several timelines to overlap, allowing glimpses of a variety of alternate histories, including one where the Vikings colonized North America, one where no Europeans colonized America, and of course one where TheAmericanCivilWar went to the other side.

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* AlternateHistory: In "Sidewise in Time", a mysterious cataclysm causes several timelines to overlap, allowing glimpses of a variety of alternate histories, including one where the Vikings colonized North America, one where no Europeans colonized America, and of course one where TheAmericanCivilWar UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar went to the other side.

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*BearsAreBadNews: "Combat Team" is set on a planet where the wildlife is so dangerous that the only way people can survive is with the help of domesticated mutant Kodiak bears.

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* TechnologyMarchesOn: In "The Skit-Tree Planet", the exploration advance team carry a film camera to record things they'll want to look at again later, and a television camera for transmitting vision back to base. It's taken for granted that these two processes can't be combined in a single camera set-up.

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