Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Creator / JackWilliamson

Go To



* ThreeLawsCompliant: "With Folded Hands..." explored the "Zeroth Law" back in 1947. This was written as a specific 'answer' to the Three Laws, to more or less demonstrate that they don't really work, the First Law doesn't protect because the definitions of 'harm' are endlessly mutable and can be gamed, and because machine minds won't necessarily be able to ''comprehend'' the subtleties of what is and is not harm anyway. The logical lesson of "With Folded Hands..." is that Laws or no Laws, good intentions or not, you don't want self-willed machines outside human control. Period.

to:

* ThreeLawsCompliant: [[DeconstructedTrope Deconstructed]] with "With Folded Hands..." ", which explored the "Zeroth Law" back in 1947. This was written as a specific 'answer' to the Three Laws, to more or less demonstrate that they don't really work, the First Law doesn't protect because the definitions of 'harm' are endlessly mutable and can be gamed, and because machine minds won't necessarily be able to ''comprehend'' the subtleties of what is and is not harm anyway. The logical lesson of "With Folded Hands..." is that Laws or no Laws, good intentions or not, you don't want self-willed machines outside human control. Period.


John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 November 10, 2006) was an early and influential ScienceFiction writer whose career lasted over seventy-five years. His first story, "The Metal Man", was published in 1928, when he was just twenty years old, and his last novel, ''The Stonehenge Gate'', was published in 2005, when he was 97. He was a regular collaborator with Creator/FrederikPohl; the two produced nearly a dozen novels together.

to:

John Stewart "Jack" Williamson (April 29, 1908 November 10, 2006) was an early and influential ScienceFiction writer whose career lasted over seventy-five years. His first story, "The Metal Man", was published in 1928, when he was just twenty years old, and his last novel, ''The Stonehenge Gate'', was published in 2005, when he was 97. He was a regular collaborator with Creator/FrederikPohl; the two produced nearly a dozen novels together.


Jack Williamson (1908-2006) was an early and influential ScienceFiction writer whose career lasted over seventy-five years. His first story, "The Metal Man", was published in 1928, when he was just twenty years old, and his last novel, ''The Stonehenge Gate'', was published in 2005, when he was 97. He was a regular collaborator with Creator/FrederikPohl; the two produced nearly a dozen novels together.

to:

Jack John Stewart Williamson (1908-2006) (April 29, 1908 November 10, 2006) was an early and influential ScienceFiction writer whose career lasted over seventy-five years. His first story, "The Metal Man", was published in 1928, when he was just twenty years old, and his last novel, ''The Stonehenge Gate'', was published in 2005, when he was 97. He was a regular collaborator with Creator/FrederikPohl; the two produced nearly a dozen novels together.



to:

->''"I have a vast curiosity about our universe, our origins, and its probable future."''

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:236:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jackwilliamson.jpg]]


He is credited with naming {{Terraform}}ing and GeneticEngineering, and was one of the first authors to write about {{Antimatter}}.

to:

He is credited with naming {{Terraform}}ing and GeneticEngineering, and was one of the first authors to write about {{Antimatter}}.
{{Antimatter}}. He was the second-ever recipient of the UsefulNotes/SFWAGrandMasterAward, after Creator/RobertAHeinlein.


His best known solo works include ''The Legion of Space'' series, the ''Humanoids'' series, and the ''Seetee Ship'' series. His best known collaborations are the ''Starchild'' series and the ''Undersea Trilogy'', both with Creator/FrederikPohl.

to:

His best known solo works include ''The Legion of Space'' series, the ''Humanoids'' series, and the ''Seetee Ship'' series. His best known collaborations are the ''Starchild'' series ''Literature/TheStarchildTrilogy'' and the ''Undersea Trilogy'', both with Creator/FrederikPohl.


* ExplosiveLeash: In the ''Starchild Trilogy'' (written with Creator/FrederikPohl) political dissidents are fitted with explosive collars with undefined timers that need to be periodically "wound up" by the guard's key to renew the timer. Within the series, legend has it that the only way around the tamper mechanism is to detach the head, remove the collar, and sew the head back on.



* MasterComputer: ''The Starchild Trilogy'' has The Plan of Man, a great computer which is responsible for managing the limited resource of Earth in the face of massive overpopulation. Even its enemies, who believe in old-fashioned concepts of freedom, are reluctant to attack it directly, since many of its functions are critical, and prefer to flee into space. Amusingly, by modern standards, it communicates by [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture printing its commands on paper]].



to:

* ''Literature/TheStarchildTrilogy'' (with Creator/FrederikPohl, 1963, 1965, 1969)

Added DiffLines:

* MasterComputer: ''The Starchild Trilogy'' has The Plan of Man, a great computer which is responsible for managing the limited resource of Earth in the face of massive overpopulation. Even its enemies, who believe in old-fashioned concepts of freedom, are reluctant to attack it directly, since many of its functions are critical, and prefer to flee into space. Amusingly, by modern standards, it communicates by [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture printing its commands on paper]].


* ''Literature/DarkerThanYouThink''

to:

* ''Literature/DarkerThanYouThink''
''Literature/DarkerThanYouThink'' (1948)

Added DiffLines:

* MegaCorp: ''Star Bridge'' (written with Creator/JamesEGunn) features the Eron Company, which has a monopoly over the secret to faster-than-light travel. When the general manager dies, this triggers a SuccessionCrisis.


* Literature/TheCosmicExpress (1931): The first-ever story about a teleportation beam or "transporter." Available [[http://fantasticworlds-jordan179.blogspot.com/2011/02/reprint-cosmic-express-by-jack.html here]].

to:

* Literature/TheCosmicExpress (1931): "Literature/TheCosmicExpress" (short, 1931): The first-ever story about a teleportation beam or "transporter." Available [[http://fantasticworlds-jordan179.blogspot.com/2011/02/reprint-cosmic-express-by-jack.html here]].
* ''Literature/DarkerThanYouThink''



!! Tropes in his works:

to:

!! Tropes in his other works:


* IShouldWriteABookAboutThis: In ''Darker Than You Think,'' one of the characters plans to write a book warning the world about the Witch Breed but it--the book you're reading--is dismissed as pulp fantasy.

to:

* IShouldWriteABookAboutThis: In ''Darker Than You Think,'' ''Literature/DarkerThanYouThink,'' one of the characters plans to write a book warning the world about the Witch Breed but it--the book you're reading--is dismissed as pulp fantasy.

Added DiffLines:

* PointOfDivergence: Coined the older name for this trope, "Jonbar hinge", in ''The Legion of Time''.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 29

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report