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The book took seven years to make. The art was painstakingly reconstructed from family photographs, alongside the panels Alison herself posed for. Upon its release, ''Fun Home'' was well received critically, and is held up as an exemplary work of both its medium and its genre.

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The book took seven years to make. The art was painstakingly reconstructed from family photographs, alongside the panels Alison herself posed for. Upon its release, ''Fun Home'' was well received critically, and is held up as an exemplary work of both its medium and its genre.\n



* WrongGenreSavvy: When Alison comes out of the closet, she considers herself some sort of dramatic heroine. When her mother reveals that her father is also gay and closeted, she realizes she's actually only the comic relief in her father's tragedy.

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* WrongGenreSavvy: WrongAssumption: When Alison comes out of the closet, she considers herself some sort of dramatic heroine. When her mother reveals that her father is also gay and closeted, she realizes she's actually only the comic relief in her father's tragedy.


-->--'''Welcome to Our House on Maple Avenue'''

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-->--'''Welcome -->-- '''Welcome to Our House on Maple Avenue'''


* {{Foil}}: Bruce and Alison, especially in the musical. Both grew up in the same small town, both turned out to be gay. Alison handled it considerably better than Bruce did, at least partially due to going to college in a time period that was rather more accepting of the LGBT community. Consequentially, Alison grows up to be a happy, well-adjusted, openly gay adult, while her father remains closeted his entire life, carries out several affairs in his marriage, and kills himself. To drive the point home in the musical, the two sing many of the same lyrics, with different contexts and meanings.

to:

* {{Foil}}: Bruce and Alison, especially in the musical. Both grew up in the same small town, both turned out to be gay. Alison handled it considerably better than Bruce did, at least partially due to going to college in a time period that was rather more accepting of the LGBT community. Consequentially, Alison grows up to be a happy, well-adjusted, openly gay adult, while her father remains closeted his entire life, carries out several affairs in his marriage, and kills himself. To drive the point home in the musical, the two sing many of the same lyrics, with different contexts and meanings. In the book, this is acknowledged by Alison mentioning that an old-fashioned term for gay people was "inverts", and jokes that she liked it because they were like inverted versions of each other.


* ImagineSpot: Alison has a brief imaginary outburst at her father's funeral of yelling at the minister. The next panel cuts back to reality, where she is quiet and polite.

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* ImagineSpot: Alison has a brief imaginary outburst at her father's funeral of yelling at the minister.mourner. The next panel cuts back to reality, where she is quiet and polite.


%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.


* DarkReprise: Helen Bechdel's "Days and Days" in the musical is a dark reprisal of "Welcome to Our House in Maple Avenue."

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* DarkReprise: DarkReprise:
**
Helen Bechdel's "Days and Days" in the musical is a dark reprisal of "Welcome to Our House in Maple Avenue."

Added DiffLines:

* GayngstInducedSuicide: You can see the contemplation of her closeted gay father's death and its later ruling as suicide. She deals with this during accepting her own homosexuality. It aimed to be a heartwarming family story, but the musical [[https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/04/branding-queerness-the-curious-case-of-fun-home/479532/ was still nicknamed the "lesbian suicide musical" by its marketing team]].


** {{In-universe}}. Alison and her girlfriend were fond of doing this to classic childhood literature. "God, [[Franchise/WinnieThePooh Christopher Robin]] was a total imperialist!"

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** {{In-universe}}.InUniverse. Alison and her girlfriend were fond of doing this to classic childhood literature. "God, [[Franchise/WinnieThePooh Christopher Robin]] was a total imperialist!"



** Demonstrated {{in-universe}} during Alison's literature class.

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** Demonstrated {{in-universe}} InUniverse during Alison's literature class.


** Bruce was also not the nicest parents, tearing up library books, yelling at his children for normal childlike behavior, micromanaging Alison's dress style because she's the only girl in the family,

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** Bruce was also not the nicest parents, parent, tearing up library books, yelling at his children for normal childlike behavior, micromanaging Alison's dress style because she's the only girl in the family,



** For Alison, the fear that she may have caused her father's "suicide," if it was a suicide, because she was willing to come out of the closet when he wasn't. In the comic she wonders what it might have been like if he ''has'' come out and succumbed to the [=AIDs=] epidemic, making his death more painful.

to:

** For Alison, the fear that she may have caused her father's "suicide," if it was a suicide, because she was willing to come out of the closet when he wasn't. In the comic she wonders what it might have been like if he ''has'' ''had'' come out and succumbed to the [=AIDs=] [=AIDS=] epidemic, making his death more painful.


* TurnOutLikeHisFather: Bechdel spends much of the book looking back on her childhood with a new perspective after she learns her dad is gay.

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* TurnOutLikeHisFather: Bechdel spends much of Allegedly the book looking back on her childhood cause of Helen's discomfort with a new perspective after she learns her dad is gay.Alison's sexual orientation.


* IWantSong: In the musical, "Welcome to Our House on Maple Avenue" is a "He [Bruce] wants" song. Then a more subtle straight example in "Ring of Keys," when young Alison, while having trouble articulating it, realizes she wants to dress similarly to the butch delivery woman.

to:

* IWantSong: In the musical, "Welcome to Our House on Maple Avenue" is a "He [Bruce] wants" song. Then a more subtle straight example in "Ring of Keys," when young Alison, while having trouble articulating it, realizes she wants to dress similarly to be like the butch delivery woman.


** {{In-universe}}. Alison and her girlfriend were fond of doing this to classic childhood literature. "God, [[WinnieThePooh Christopher Robin]] was a total imperialist!"

to:

** {{In-universe}}. Alison and her girlfriend were fond of doing this to classic childhood literature. "God, [[WinnieThePooh [[Franchise/WinnieThePooh Christopher Robin]] was a total imperialist!"


* TakeThat: ''A flair for the dramatic'' While not a song, has Allison calling out her dad to Joan after receiving a reply to her coming out letter believing that he doesn't know anything about what she's going through. Except it's before she finds out that her Dad [[spoiler: is gay]].

to:

* TakeThat: ''A flair for the dramatic'' While not a song, has Allison calling out her dad to Joan after receiving a reply to her coming out letter believing that he doesn't know anything about what she's going through. Except it's before she finds out that her Dad [[spoiler: is gay]].gay.


[[quoteright:280:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/funhome.gif]]

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[[quoteright:280:http://static.[[quoteright:227:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/funhome.gif]]

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