What's Happening

Troperville

Tools

collapse/expand topics back to Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian

MarqFJA
topic
12:03:44 PM Dec 23rd 2013
Why does this page lack a character sheet, or at least a separate list for tropes that apply specifically to the title character's person rather than to the plot of the stories that he's involved in?
Prfnoff
topic
01:15:49 PM Dec 26th 2011
Deleted the entire "Stuff inspired by Conan" section. Works that are only pseudo-related shouldn't be listed on work pages, and the list was mostly redundant with the Barbarian Hero trope page anyway.
howdyho
topic
10:32:37 AM Apr 17th 2011
Do we really need so many tropes pertaining to The Movie and the Comic Book Adaptation of the same name? Wouldn't it simply be best to have separate pages for those adaptations?

I'm only asking here to see if there's an official reason from any moderators as to why that shouldn't be so; if nobody in charge gives me a reason why not, I'm pretty much just gonna do it. If they do, I'll let it lie.
YoungGun2
04:00:56 PM Aug 27th 2011
Agreed, I also think the 2011 film needs some more relavant tropes to it.
Mabalasic
topic
01:31:55 AM Nov 16th 2010
I think this page needs more delineation between "pure Howard" and pastiche, everything else. Will try to work on it.
tricksterson
08:50:25 AM Nov 18th 2010
Please do.
Kalaong
topic
01:54:42 PM Oct 12th 2010
Do We Have A Trope For "forgotten eras" such as the Hyborean Age?
painocus
09:24:54 PM Jun 9th 2012
edited by painocus
Camacan
moderator
topic
12:31:34 AM Oct 8th 2010
I think most of the material under Absurdly Sharp Blade was coversing about side issues. I streamlined this example on the main page. Here is the original.

  • Absurdly Sharp Blade: Conan must have his swords custom made out of Unobtanium, they can cut through nearly anything. Hardly a fight scene goes by that doesn't have the Cimmerian casually hewing off limbs and heads, plunging a sword through chainmail like wet paper or rotten fruit or some other metaphor for softness, and occasionally bisecting still-helmeted skulls and whole torsos. In "The People Of The Black Circle", he chops through a door with his sword. And yet it's still always described as "razor-sharp". He must go through a lot of blades.
    • Conan does state at various points that he regularly changes blades, and he even breaks some on the bodies of his enemies. In his very first short story he actually breaks the magic sword he needs to kill a demon in the head of a would-be assassin before said demon appears. Not that this stops him from killing the demon anyway with what's left of it...
      • In Sword of Skelos he voices the opinion that you can never have too many back-up weapons.
    • It also helps that Conan is one of the most famous examples of Heroic Build to help make his blades cut through everything like butter.
      • It should be pointed out that Hyborian Age metallurgy is likely to be far in advance of its Medieval equivalent: "Akbitanan" steel (an homage to Ecbatana, capital of the Parthian Empire) is said to be unbreakable.
    • The sword of the film is basically either magic or of ridiculously advanced metallurgical quality. The track playing when Conan finds it is titled "The Atlantean Sword", after all.
      • The steel sword his father forged was of such high quality that the villain kept it as a treasure, and stealing such weapons is implied to have been the entire purpose behind attacking his people. The Atlantean sword cut through it like tin foil.
Camacan
moderator
topic
11:54:48 PM Oct 7th 2010
edited by Camacan
The Elric Saga is very probably not a decontruction of Conan the Barbarian.

  • Word of God gives another target.
  • The parallels between Elric and Conan are messy and unconvincing: one is brawny, the other frail. One is unprincipled, the other is too, one destroys the world, the other doesn't.

So moving this example to the discussion page:

  • Elric of Melnibone was created by Michael Moorcock as a Deconstruction of Conan and the type of Heroic Fantasy he exemplified — while Conan is hardly a Cape, he's usually of good-cheer while he robs an ancient tomb blind or leads a bunch of rag-tag pirates to victory, rape, and pillaging. On the other hand, Elric is frail and amoral, traffics with dark powers, and eventually destroys the world itself.
    • Word of God is that Elric, and the Eternal Champion cycle in general, was aimed more at deconstructing the high-fantasy tropes created and popularized by Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, which Moorcock hated.
back to Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian

TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy