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This is a "Wild Mass Guess" entry, where we pull out all the sanity stops on theorizing. The regular entry on this topic is elsewhere. Please see this programme note.
VeggieTales
Rack, Shack, and Benny are not their universe's equivalents of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego
Nebby K. Nezzer's brother is seen in the "Toy That Saved Christmas", and Mr. Lunt serves as the henchman to both. Since the show's Biblical history seems to be identical (apart from vegetable characters), that would require Mr. Lunt and the Nezzers to be a couple thousand years old.

  • The episode "Rack, Shack, and Benny" could have taken place in modern times. They did have technology.

Alternatively, they caught a ride to the future, because...
The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything repurposed the Help-Seeker into a general-purpose time machine.
That explains why we see them in the present at the French seafood restaurant when they are able to recount an event they experienced during the Old Testament era.
The creators are atheists.
They're trying to make fun of Christians in a subtle parody by calling them mindless vegetables.
  • They must be hiding it pretty well then, considering that the series is now reaching its 45th stand alone video plus two movies and countless tie-ins. And they've never stopped making references to the goodness of God, or the importance of biblical principles. While its true they had to compromise a little to keep putting material out by bringing in contemporary stories under biblical principles and retold for kids, I think Phil and Mike were sincere in their efforts to promote Christianity to the children of video viewing age.
    • The best parodies are the subtle ones.
    • Not the ones that are so subtle that nearly the entire audience takes the message at face value, and misses the supposed satire. If we pretend that Veggie Tales really is a parody, though (which it isn't), then it's a pretty counterproductive one, as all it's succeeded in doing is to spread The Gospel to a whole new generation of kids. Whoops.

Bob the tomato is gay or an atheist.
Come on, he's the only fruit in a world of vegetables!
  • Well there also is The Peach who apeared in two silly songs.
  • And the Grape family. And Madame Blueberry. And if you insist that Bob the tomato is a fruit, then so is Larry the cucumber.
  • What about the Gourds?

The unnamed scallions represent the devil.
In almost all of their appearances, the scallions play some form of a villain (example: the crones who encourage the King to throw worshippers into the Lion's Den) or represent one of the Seven Deadly Sins (for example, in Madame Blueberry, they represent Greed). All the other vegetables who play some form of a villain usually get redeemed by the end and become supporting characters — and on the rare occasions that they do play a bad guy, it's usually because they happen to fit that role well.
  • The "crones" are supposed to be wise-men and councilors. It's hard to give a lot of male sexual identity to vegetables on helium.
  • Clearly the scallions are supposed to represent the devil and the Seven Deadly Sins. This is why they have no name and are kept Out of Focus.
  • And they sing in perky rhythms. They are clearly Rap-Scallions.

The one unnamed scallion that's been around since show one is God.
Omnipresent and underappreciated, in A Form You Are Comfortable With.
  • That makes a disturbing amount of sense.
    • While it could theoretically make sense, he's played the bad guy way too many times for that to be true, plus it was already Jossed seeing as how the shows creators said when they were starting out that they would never portray Jesus/God as a vegetable.
    • Well then, maybe he's Satan?

Archibald Asparagus is a homosexual.
Now, before you bring up Lovey, let me just say that you cannot possibly look at that thing at tell me it's not a tranny. The big, dramatic eyelashes, the beauty mark, the outfits, that my friends is a drag queen. The reason we don't see her anymore? He was feeling brought down about being on a Christian kids show and decided that he didn't want to be involved in the films anymore.

In Lyle the Kindly Viking, Lyle is the son of Mabel and Olaf.
Lyle's character is played by Junior Asparagus, and a random lady asparagus plays Mabel, and Mabel is married to Mr. Nezzer's character, Olaf. Mabel is the first one to address Lyle when he comes along after the Vikings finished another raid, and Olaf is the first one to scold Lyle for missing raids. Olaf proceeds to get a song in which he wonders about Lyle, and when he learns the truth about Lyle's little expeditions he is much angrier than the situation would really warrant. It's not just that Lyle is ignoring the Viking ways; Olaf is angry about it because it means he failed as a father.

In The Toy that Saved Christmas, George is not telling Annie a story about something that happened in his past. He is making it up as he goes along and basing the characters in his story on people he knew.

George did not want to tell Annie another story because he thought it was past her bedtime, but she demanded one and he gave in. None of it is real and he is making things up, but some of it is based on his life experiences and people he knew.

  • In the story, George is much younger—as evidenced by his brown mustache. However, the story mentions that Mr. Lunt used to work for Mr. Nezzer's brother (a reference to Rack, Shack, and Benny.) George was also in Rack, Shack, and Benny. But in that one, his mustache was white, not brown, which means the timelines don't quite match up. Unless mustache dye was involved, George is right off the bat not being entirely factual.
  • Sometimes it seems like George doesn't quite know exactly what's going on in his own story. When Annie asks how Louie is alive, George handwaves it with "Maybe he was wired different; who knows?" and quickly changes the subject, and when Annie asks who the "smart person" George mentions is, he stumbles for a few seconds before finally going, "me!" Which Annie is incredulous about.
  • The sled chase scene had such random things as lassoing a tree and a line of sledding penguins propelled by a buzzsaw because George gave up on trying to make his story make sense and just had fun with it at that point.
  • Several of the people in George's story are suspiciously similar to people George knew at the chocolate factory. His story has the same Mr. Lunt, he casts "Mr. Nezzer's brother" as the main villain, Laura from Dinkletown is very similar to Laura from the chocolate factory, and Bob, Junior and Larry are suspiciously similar to Rack, Shack, and Benny.

The Nezzers are eventually going to go out of business because of legal troubles.

Grandma Nezzer had good intentions when she started the Nezzer family on its factory biz, but unfortunately future generations weren't as good and kindhearted as she was.
  • Ebeneezer Nezzer starts the problems for the Nezzer family by accidentally blowing up his own factory in An Easter Carol. While it was accidental, his carelessness very nearly led to the deaths of both himself and Cavis, and probably led to laws being passed to prevent people from making tin chickens that laid plastic eggs.
  • Centuries later, Nebby K. Nezzer runs a chocolate factory. He makes children work ridiculous hours and severely underpays them, in defiance of child labor laws and minimum wage, and things like people getting anvils on their heads are simply ignored. Then Nebby K. tries to burn three of his employees alive because they refused to worship a chocolate bunny. The reason Mr. Lunt left Nebby K. was that while he was fine doing evil things for his employers, he was not fine with the ensuing lawsuits as it came to the attention of outsiders that Nezzer mistreated his underage, underpaid workers.
  • Nebby K.'s brother, Wally P., makes extremely dangerous toys for small children. Then, when he catches three kids and one of his own toys in his tv studio without his permission, he threatens them on television for the world to see. Then the entire population of Dinkletown catches Wally trying to kill the kids. Apparently Mom and Dad Asparagus never did go to the police about the fact that Wally P. tried to murder their five year old son, but since so many people know about it, it's going to get out that Nezzer is an attempted murderer and a manufacturer of unsafe toys.
  • Due to both brothers facing legal issues because of their actions, the name of Nezzer will be viewed negatively and it will be very difficult for any future Nezzer to set up a business.

Every movie will cast an unexpected Veggie in the spotlight.

In Jonah they cast Archibald Asparagus as the main character instead of Larry or someone else who usually gets cast as a protagonist. Same deal with The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything where Pa Grape gets to be the main character. Any further movie they will continue with this trend. One of these days we'll even see Scallion #1 in the spotlight.

UnderdogWMG/Western Animation (Series)The Venture Bros.

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