WMG: Batman: The Animated Series

See also WMG/DCAU

The Art Shift between BTAS and TNBA...
...coincides with a Tone Shift. Where BTAS dealt with more noirish elements and crime activity, TNBA could somewhat be argued to focus more on straight super heroics, delving more into the DCU outside Gotham and pitting Batman against his more colourful rogues—as opposed to straight mobsters like Thorne, or Corrupt Corporate Executive types like Daggett and Boyle. BTAS showed Batman's success at decreasing certain criminal elements in town while simultaneously giving rise to more outlandish adventures with the Arkham Regulars. In a way, it almost mirrors and presages The Long Halloween and that story's central theme: the passage of time.

In "Perchance to Dream" Selina Kyle was actually about to offer Bruce a handjob at the office to cheer him up.
In a dream induced by the Mad Hatter, Selina visits Bruce at work because his mother called her and said Bruce "could use some cheering up." She perches on his desk and purrs, "Who better for the job than the woman you're marrying next week?" while slowly removing one of her gloves. She begins to reach out to him with her one ungloved hand before pausing and noticing that he really is upset. Putting this here rather than Radar because I'm not sure if I just have a dirty mind or if this was actually implied.

Andrea Beaumount has supernatural powers, specifically communication with the dead.
In the animated "Batman: Mask of the Phantasm" she explains that she can imagine what her deceased mother would say if she talked to her. Perhaps she didn't know it at first, but she really could talk to her loved ones in the great beyond.
  • She also claimed she was closer to her father than ever, even he had been dead for some time.
    • She could have used this power to bargain for other powers, or learn to develop others such as teleportation.
      • However at the end when she says "I am alone", she may have meant that she lost her communication power as a result of her crusade.

Poison Ivy and Harley Quinn are not lesbians
I realize it's far-fetched and I don't have any evidence to back it up, but I get the feeling there is at least a one in a million chance that they are just friends. Now if you'll excuse me, there is a mob of angry fanboys outside my door with torches and pitchforks.
  • Perhaps Harley Quinn is bisexual. She has a serious crush on the Joker, who is male, and had grandchildren in Batman Beyond (though her kid may have been in-vitro or adopted).
    • Harley suffers from Single-Target Sexuality. She is hopelessly obsessed with Mistah' J. When he throws her out (literally) she immediately focuses on the very next person to show her kindness: Ivy.
  • In Poison Ivy's case, it seems a bit obvious. In "Eternal Youth", she was chasing the rich lady through the woods and probably enjoys every minute of it; later she sits on another rich woman's butt. In "Trial", she was staring at Janet Van Dorn and gives her a Psychotic Smirk. She was checking out Dr. Joan Leland when she walked pass her in "Harley's Holiday"; Harley noticed, when she said "What are you looking at?".

Poison Ivy and Harley Quinn, for all their sexual hang-ups, are actually Heterosexual Life-Partners with each other.
In keeping with being modeled after the Poison Ivy of the mainstream comics, the animated version of Poison Ivy sexuality pretty much involves Anything That Moves, including some of her plants in some cases (and not just the ones she's anthropomorphized to look human). However, in both the comics and the cartoons, the only times we ever see Ivy do anything sexual is when she's hurting people: in both Harvey Dent's case and Batman's, she was kissing them in order to poison them. (In one comic where she kissed Supergirl, she was—you guessed it—trying to poison her too.) In other episodes where she uses her pheremones to seduce people (of both sexes), she's scamming them and leading them to their death and destruction. For all that she does love her plants collectively and want to preserve them as a species, she also uses and disposes of the individual ones just as heartlessly as she does her human victims: consider how many of them she used up in "Home and Garden" just to have a "family" on her own terms.

Harley Quinn, however, is Poison Ivy's personal project, almost a Morality Pet, the only human to whom her otherwise extreme misanthropy does not apply. She really does love Harley Quinn—but in a "Sisters Before Misters" way. As such, Harley Quinn is the one and only human in the world with whom she would never do anything sexual, not even so much as a kiss on the cheek (even while not wearing her poisoned lipstick and having given Harley Quinn immunity to it anyway), because Poison Ivy can only see sexuality as a way of hurting people, and she would never do anything to hurt her best—not to mention only—friend.

The moral of Mask of the Phantasm is that sexism is bad.
If Bruce (having already learned Andrea was his equal if not better at martial arts) hadn't assumed she would "always be at home waiting for me" but thought of her as a possible partner, he wouldn't have felt forced to choose between love and crime-fighting. Most likely, he would have shared his secret with her earlier; maybe they would have been able to save her father from the mob together. Finding a woman who could handle his secret if not fight alongside him (instead of one whose worry would be a burden) never occurred to him, and that is the only reason he ended up alone/resigned himself to being alone.
  • To be fair, the only time Andrea's by his side during a fight (when they run into the bikers harassing the guy with the box full of jewlery) she just stands on the sidelines pulling concerned faces and actually distracts him during the fight, leading to him taking a baseball bat to the ribs with enough force that the bat breaks. Considering how her attempt to fight of Salvatore's men when they arrive to threaten her father results in one hiya noise before she gets a taste of Standard Female Grab Area, it seems that Andrea's status as a potential partner in crimefighting wasn't really viable until after her dad got killed, which presumably led her to supplement her self defence class training with Bruce-style Training from Hell.

Killer Croc's theory about Batman being a Robot isn't just him being stupid.
Remember it actually did happen in one episode! Croc probably had an offscreen encounter with the Batman Android, and that's why he thinks Batman could be a robot.
  • Never mind that he was actually Batman in disguise at the time.
    • Meh, details...
    • Remember though, Joker told him not to bring it up "again", so this isn't the first time it's come up.
    • Worth noting that His Silicon Soul was produced and aired after Almost Got'im.

The girl with red hair in "Legends of the Dark Knight" is actually Carrie Kelly
She fits the physical description from the books, and how else would she know about the events in TDKR? She time traveled or dimension-hopped or something.
  • She is Carrie Kelley. But she was never Robin, and her story never happened, it's just her own view of what Batman is like. She likes to put herself in the story; and made herself wrong when she thought Robin is a girl.

Those guys in the opening sequence didn't do anything wrong.
There was an explosion and they ran away, took it to a bit of an extreme by climbing a roof, then ran into Batman who was probably just scowling at the city from that particular roof top. He looks at them like he's going to attack, so they pull their guns to defend themselves. The rest is history.
  • They pulled guns. On BATMAN. If that's not doing something wrong, I dunno what is.
    • They tried to pull a bank robbery which had gone wrong.
      • They were outside the building when the explosion went off — possibly they were lookouts who ran for it when things started to go wrong. That would explain why they carried guns and pulled them immediately when their escape was interrupted.
      • Maybe they were working for the bank owner, blowing up the bank to collect insurance.
      • Which I believe is legal in Gotham.
      • Not to Batman.
      • I think the implication is that the bank owner was pulling an insurance fraud scam, which isn't legal even in Gotham. Legitimate demolitions aren't usually scheduled during the night.

Matt's story about his uncle meeting Batman and Robin did happen.
Only it happened during Batman (and Robin)'s early crimefighting career. It happened not too soon after Joker first appeared. Batman also wore the "Golden Age" costume in the flashback of "Robin's Reckoning". The Robin in the flashback was Dick Grayson, soon after he found out Bruce is Batman in the flashback, but in this flashback he's been Robin for a while. His uncle was half-asleep at the time, which explains the Art Shift and the cheesy dialogues, since that's how he recalls. Batman did say "old-chum" (despite one of the kids thinking it's ridiculous), he also called Juice that too (albeit in sarcasm).
  • He wore the same suit in the flashback of Robin's Reckoning that he wore throughout the entire series up until The New Batman Adventures

Dr. Joan Leland is doing drugs.
She's the most mellow Arkham employee seen in any medium. She's definately on something. My vote is either a lot of pot or opium.

Simon Trent knows Batman's secret identity.
Bruce Wayne is way too smart to say the same thing he did as Batman ("As a kid, I used to watch you with my father. The Gray Ghost was my hero.") to somebody unless he wants them to know who he is. It's a fairly common trope in the series note , and he pulls it with Simon out of his profound respect for the man. Simon's astounded reaction ("...really?") can be interpreted as either...
  • He is amazed that someone like Bruce Wayne - a billionare philanthropist - would be such a huge fan...
  • ...or the gears turned in his head and he realized Bruce is Batman.
  • Is this really a WMG? The implication was very obviously that Bruce deliberately said that as a means to let Simon in on his secret.

Only Ivy is Bi the Way. Harley is more If It's You, It's Okay.
I don't recall Harley being attracted that way to any other women. (If I'm wrong, please note it) And I know it's not Single-Target Sexuality because she kissed Batman in one episode.

Harley, at some point in the past, slept with the Scarecrow.
The Mad Love comic strongly implies if not outright states that Harley got through university primarily by sleeping with the male teachers. Jonathan Crane was a teacher at Gotham University, and they treat each other with some odd politeness in the interaction in Harley's Holiday, especially considering Crane's general attitude towards other people.

Penguin had cosmetic/reconstructive surgery
In TNBA he suddenly has proper hands. Regardless of the art shift explanation, he's also rolling in cash at this point. Prvided he had the proper separate bones in his hands, the surgeons likely reconstructed them. He wears gloves all the time because it's not a perfect cosmetic job- he might not have fingernails and they don't look like proper hands so he hides them. He could've also fixed his nose, but probably kept it because it was recognizable.

'Big Bad Harv's' presence in Harvey Dent's mind was exacerbated by his encounter with Poison Ivy.
Granted, this is just probably a casualty of the fact that Harvey is basically a plot device victim to establish Ivy in the DC Animated Universe, but consider the fact that Harvey doesn't seem to have any 'Big Bad Harv' breakouts or show any signs of having problems in 'Pretty Poison'. In 'Two-Face Part One', he has about four incidents in an incredibly short period - attacking the thug, the incident during his therapy session, nearly attacking his assistant, and attacking Thorne and his men when confronted with his stolen psychiatric report - it's five if you count his initial nightmare; So while the physically toxic and lethal effects of Ivy's poison were removed by the antidote Batman obtain, Harvey's mental issues were exacerbated by the poison, making Big Bad Harv a more frequent presence in Harvey's mind.

Alfred Pennyworth is Bruce Wayne's biological father.
In "Nothin to Fear," Alfred says, "I know your father would be proud of you because...I'm so proud of you."