Music: Maximum The Hormone

From left to right: Ue-channote , Daisuke-hannote , Naonote  and Ryo-kunnote .

Maximum the Hormone is a Japanese band which derives influence from Punk Rock, Funk, Rock, Pop, Metal, Anime, Manga and Japanese popular culture with lashings of sex.

They are not a "comedy" band, but many of their songs, like "Bikini Sports Ponchin", "Chu Chu Lovely Muni Muni Mura Mura Purin Purin Boron Nurururerorero" and "Houchou Hasami (Cutter Knife Dosu Kiri)" have pretty damn funny lyrics when contrasted with the upbeat tunes of the songs.

The band are probably best known for their songs "What's up, people?!" and "Zetsubou Billy", which are the second opening and closing themes of the Death Note anime, and are generally harder edged and less hilariously perverted than most of their songs ("A kindergartener is fine, too."). It's worth noting that they're also pretty successful in their home country, their latest album being in the top 20 best selling albums of 2013 in Japan. Not bad for a metal band.

The current members are:
  • Daisuke-han (screaming vocals, rapping)
  • Nao (drums, vocals)
  • Ryo-kun (guitar, clean vocals)
  • Ue-chan (bass, backing vocals)

Daisuke-han and Nao are founding members, but when Sugi and Key left the band in 1999, Ryo-kun and Ue-chan joined them in the same year.

Faith No More, Incubus, System of a Down, Andrew W.K. and the early work of Red Hot Chili Peppers are comparable.


Their music contains examples of

  • Avant-Garde Metal: Mash-up genres with impunity.
  • Digital Piracy Is Evil: Somewhat inverted: the lyric "Stop, stop Winny upload" refers to the old p2p service Winny (comparable to Napster), but when asked in an interview about using such an old reference, the lead singer mentioned that he wanted to have a catchy “STOP” phrase where other stuff like “STOP NUKES” could be replaced. Knowing their self-referential humor and love of playing with expectations...
  • Dissonant Serenity
  • Expository Theme Tune: "What's up, people?" and "Zetsubou Billy" are this to Death Note.
  • Filk Song:
    • "F". Its about Dragon Ball's Freeza (and was later heard by original author Akira Toriyama and inspired him to write the film Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection ‘F’, which also features the song.)
    • Done in a weird way with the song "Unbelievable! (Suwomintsu Hokereiro Mifueho)" off of Yoshu Fukushu. The lyrics are about old school video gaming back in the Famicom days (mentioning how back then most gamers had to rely on passwords instead of saving), and the second half of the song name is a password from Konami Wai Wai World.
  • Funk Metal: Driving slap-bass taken Up to Eleven just sounds like Funk, especially in the hands of their bassist.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: "What's up, people?!"'s includes the repeated line, "HEY HEY! Ningen sanka ai nige ningen fuan ka?" ("Hey hey! Human paean. Do humans worry when love escapes?") The line is pronounced almost identically to the intended line, "HEY HEY! NINGEN SUCKER! AH NINGEN NINGEN FUCKER!!"note 
    • Which, ironically, is the most well known translation by Death Note fansubbers and fans.
  • Gratuitous English: "Koi No Mega Lover" - just from the title you can hear this making its insidious presence felt.
  • Hardcore Punk: Had their roots in this.
  • Iconic Outfit/Iconic Item: Ryo's toilet sandals of VIC, which he wears almost all the time. It inspires the song Benjo Sandal Dance, which is about his habit of wearing those sandals.
  • Indecipherable Lyrics: The screaming and the Motor Mouth lyrics make it very hard to understand a word.
  • Japanese Delinquents: Mentioned in "Chu 2 The Beam" ("8th Grader Beam" in English). Mentions how grade schooler punks are known to hang around the mini amusement park areas on the rooftops of stores that are somewhat common in Japan.
  • Last Note Nightmare/Big Rock Ending: "What's up, people?!" explodes into a thrash metal freakout after the title is screamed. This ending even appears in full in the TV-sized edit used for Death Note.
  • Lyrical Dissonance: "Chu Chu Lovely Muni Muni Mura Mura Purin Purin Boron Nurururerorero".
    • "My Girl" from the Greatest The Hits EP is a (mostly) upbeat Nu-metal track (with shades of 80s glam rock/metal). If you didn't know Japanese, you'd be forgiven for thinking it was a light-hearted song about a relationship. It's actually incredibly dirty and about how much they love pussy.
  • Metal Scream: Daisuke provides some very impressively ranged harsh vocals. Luckily for him, Ryo takes charge of the clean vocals, so his larynx probably isn't completely stripped out.
  • Mind Screw: Most of their music videos really.
  • Mohs Scale of Rock and Metal Hardness: Ranges from 6 to 10, but they can go as low as 2 to as high as 11. It's impossible to tell, though
  • Motor Mouth: The lyrics are so fast, it's hard to understand anything. Sometimes you might mistake the language of the lyrics.
  • Neoclassical Punk Zydeco Rockabilly: They combine and cross genres more-or-less when they feel like it. Few other J-rock bands have achieved the same level of Genre-Busting, the notable examples being Dir en grey and Melt Banana.
  • Nu Metal: Cite Korn as an influence and mix clean, harsh and rapped vocals. Not your typical Nu Metal band, though, it's safe to say.
  • Sibling Team: Half of them. Nao recruited her younger brother Ryo after Sugi and Key left the band.
  • The Smurfette Principle: Nao is the only female member of the band. She is also the oldest member of them and she's reaching her fourties.
  • Visual Kei: Invoked in the video for "Zetsubou Billy", which depicts a Stylistic Suck Visual band, among other Stylistic Suck takes on other music subcultures.
  • Vulgar Humor: Pretty much their schtick most of the time. For example, on would think their album Kusobannote  and the first song on the list "Koi no Sweet Kuso Meriken" note  would be a red flag for this.
  • Walking Shirtless Scene: Ue-chan, as depicted above, doesn't often wear a shirt.
  • X Meets Y: System of a Down meets Japan.