Prefers the Illusion

"You know, I know this steak doesn't exist. I know that when I put it in my mouth, the Matrix is telling my brain that it is juicy and delicious. After nine years, you know what I realize? [Takes a bite of steak] Ignorance is bliss."
Cypher, The Matrix

A character knows that they are in a false, constructed reality and that nothing around them is real. Once discovered, leaving is a matter of determination and willpower. The illusion is broken, they're free.

Yet they choose to stay.

There are many reasons for this. It may be because life is good in the Matrix, and the character realizes they are truly happy there. Maybe they prefer the safety of delusions to bleak reality. Or it could be that to them the false reality seems more real than the alternative, if it's impossible to tell the difference between what is real and what isn't. Who's to say that something isn't true, if they choose to believe it is?

In works where reality is treated as painful and complex, this may become a Downer Ending, especially if there is an Anti-Escapism Aesop. Characters may or may not be successful in their choice to stay. Other characters may try to "save" them from the false reality, or the truth of their fantasy may become too much to bear. In contrast to this trope, I Choose to Stay has a positive connotation for helping others or resolving ongoing conflicts in an equally real setting. However, the "fantasy" is usually Another World rather than a false, constructed reality.

Compare Longing for Fictionland when characters prefer to live by the rules and expectations of fictional stories rather than Real Life, without actually going to a false reality. Not to be confused with I Reject Your Reality, which is stubbornness rather than a deliberate choice. Please refrain from adding Real Life examples.


Examples

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     Anime and Manga 
  • Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex: in the episode "Tachikoma Runs Away; The Movie Director's Dream—ESCAPE FROM", Section 9 acquires an computer programmed with a simulation created by a Mad Artist. The simulation is just a movie theater playing the artist's final film on a constant loop. Everyone who enters the simulation becomes so engrossed with the film that they don't want to leave—the audience never sees any of the film, but it's apparently just that good. Even the normally-stoic Major Kusanagi is moved to tears by the film, but she ultimately has enough willpower to stop watching and shut the simulation down.
  • In Neon Genesis Evangelion, the ending involves protagonist Shinji Ikari having to choose between staying with all of humanity in the sea of LCL or returning to Earth as a singular being. He chooses the latter, but since no one appears alongside him at the beach except Asuka, we can infer the rest of humanity preferred to stay in the "perfect", unthinking, unfeeling LCL sea.

     Comic Books 
  • The ending of La Quête de l'Oiseau du Temps. It turns out the Action Girl was a kind of holographic projection created by the Small, Annoying Creature. The hero, who had been led to believe she was his daughter, prefers to keep the creature (and therefore his daughter) alive rather than face the fact that her mother manipulated and betrayed him.

     Film 
  • One of the possible endings of Brazil has the protagonist retreat permanently into his Happy Place as a means to escape his torture. Oddly, this isn't as heartbreaking as you'd think considering the Crapsack World he lives in.
  • In The Matrix, Cypher sides with the machines because he prefers the Matrix to the After the End reality of Earth.
  • One of the theories for Shutter Island. While it appears that the doctor's efforts at curing the main character of his massive defensive delusions have ultimately failed, the final line may imply that it didn't fail. Instead, he deliberately maintained the act in order to be lobotomized, and forget everything anyway.
  • Inception:
    • This is the one danger of falling into Limbo. Because the time dilation causes a dream to last for decades, the mind will live out an entire lifetime that becomes the dreamer's new reality. By the time the dream ends and they wake up, they'll have either lost touch with reality or have lost their mental faculties to begin with.
    • Early in the movie, we're introduced to a group of people who, dissatisfied with the real world, have chosen to live the remainder of their lives in a dream.

     Literature 
  • In the second Dragon Age novel, The Calling, all of the Wardens and Maric are trapped in the Fade, within separate dreams designed to keep them from wanting to leave. One by one, they break free of their prison. Except for Nicolas, who chooses to stay in his little cabin in the woods, reunited with his recently killed lover, Julien.
  • In the novel Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World the protagonist almost escapes from his Epiphanic Prison, but turns back at the last minute, choosing to stay in the town, committing mental suicide.
  • Lucien Mulholland of Mary Hoffman's City of Masks chooses the reality in his head to the one where he's dying from cancer.
  • In The Pendragon Adventure, this is the reason that Saint Dane wins his first territory. The people of Veelox refuse to abandon the virtual reality world Lifelight, which gives users a chance to simulate living a perfect life. Eventually, so many people give up their real lives that society collapses and millions die when workers stop maintaining the Lifelight pyramids.
  • In a Witch World short story by Andre Norton, the protagonist, severely disfigured and disabled by a magical accident, chooses to live in a permanent dream and forget his harsh reality.
  • In the second Deltora Quest series, some of the Auron refugees created an illusory copy of their idyllic, sophisticated homeland on the underground island they fled to. To preserve the (emotional aspect of) this illusion, they forced all dissenters off the island and magically sealed its borders. A millennium or so later, only one person still lives on Auron- he killed everyone else to keep the illusion 'pure', as they couldn't deny reality or their traumatic memories of it. The exiles, in comparison, adapted to the ocean's "strange, wild beauty" and thrived.
  • In Arthur C. Clarke's novella "The Lion of Comarre", the protagonist discovers an automated city of people living in virtual reality. When he tries to "liberate" two of the inhabitants, one is utterly confused by the return to reality and another understands what happened and tells him to go away and let him resume the fantasy. He leaves them to their dreams.
  • In The Silver Chair, when faced with the Lady of the Green Kirtle's claim that Aslan and Narnia are simply things they dreamed up, Puddleglum answers that if that's true he prefers them to reality.

     Live Action TV 
  • In Star Trek: The Original Series, this is the ending of both the original unbroadcast pilot "The Cage", and the two-part episode of the main series it was re-edited and expanded into, "The Menagerie". In "The Cage", Captain Pike's love-interest Vina turns out to have been left severely disfigured and disabled by a spaceship crash and the well-intentioned but ignorant medical treatment she was given by a species of aliens with no prior experience of humans. She prefers to stay in the virtual reality created by the aliens where she is beautiful and able-bodied. In the ending of "The Menagerie", Pike, who has been left almost completely paralysed by an accident since the past events, decides to join her for the same reason.
  • Subverted in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, "Homeward." A group of relatively primitive people are tricked into thinking that they are still on their home planet-simply traveling to a new region-when in fact they are inside a holodeck, and are the only survivors of a cataclysm that destroyed their world, in transit to a new one. When one discovers the truth, he's offered a chance to remain on board the Enterprise. Instead, he commits suicide.
  • In Ally McBeal, one of the clients at Ally's firm is a sad, lonely, but very wealthy spinster. She has sequential dreams of a life where she met a man, got married, and raised a happy family. She is petitioning the court to put her in a chemically induced coma so she can sleep forever and live the life where she's actually happy.

     Tabletop Games 
  • In Shadowrun, SimSense (or just Sims) are virtual reality devices which allow the viewer to experience all of the 5 senses (actors appearing in Sims tend to be very good at controlling their emotions). This has lead to this trope on a massive scale, with Sim addiction being more common than chemical addictions. Made even worse by "Better Than Life" (or BTL) chips, which have the limiters illegally removed, making them even more vivid and "real" than the original recordings.

     Video Games 
  • In the ending to Drawn to Life 2, the villain, Wilfre, had discovered that the whole world was All Just a Dream created by a boy in a coma. Rather than allowing the boy to wake up, thus ending the world as they knew it, he conspired to keep him in his coma so as to continue their existence. He also briefly convinced Mari to help him, but she later decided it'd be more noble to sacrifice their entire world so one boy could wake up back in his.
  • In the second Neverwinter Nights expansion, at one point the illithid Elder Brain may force you into a Lotus-Eater Machine illusion. You can break out, or you can choose to stay for a Non Standard Game Over of your body tolling away as a mindless slave.
  • Within The Matrix Online, there's a group of people called "Cypherites" who argue that Cypher was right and that Neo and the people of Zion had no right to decide for the rest of humanity. After all, who would want to live in a dead, post-apocalyptic world that humans themselves were largely responsible for?
  • Eternal Sonata is set in the Dying Dream of Frédéric Chopin — or, perhaps, a Dream Land that he's lucky enough to enter. Whether or not it's real, in the Bittersweet Ending, he comes to believe in it and chooses to stay while his physical body dies; otherwise, he wakes up... on his deathbed, with tuberculosis.

     Western Animation 
  • In a What If? episode of The Simpsons Homer is shown what his life would have been like had he won Student Council President in high school. He's shown this in a pot of magic spaghetti sauce. At one point he shouts "I want to live in the sauce!" and tries to jump in. He is restrained by the chef who prepared the alternate-universe-showing sauce, who says "If you could live in the sauce, don't you think I'd live in the sauce?"
  • The finale for Gravity Falls shows the only reason Mabel hasn't freed herself from Bill's bubble prison by the time Dipper, Wendy, and Soos break in to rescue her is because she's aware of the nature of the bubble and has decided she'd rather stay. Leaving the bubble would result in facing the next year without Dipper, she believed he intended to stay in Gravity Falls when she returned home for school. The bubble lets her live in a world filled with glitter and rainbows, populated with talking stuffed animals and a cooler, more supportive version of Dipper (a.k.a. Dippy-Fresh). It takes a lot of convincing on Dipper's part to get her to leave the bubble, which she eventually does.
  • In the Adventure Time "Islands" mini-series, Finn and Jake discover an island whose inhabitants have spent their whole lives hooked up to virtual reality devices. When Jake "frees" them by disconnecting the mainframe, the people find themselves unable to cope in the real world. Seeing this, Finn decides that they're better off living in their virtual realities.
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