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Evolutionary Stasis
So, you have a dystopian epic set millions or billions of years in the future. It's safe to assume that there are still humans, and possibly other organic life forms, still reproducing.

One would think that, even if natural selection has ceased to be a factor because of a static environment, mutation and genetic drift would still be factors. Even the proponents of Designer Babies rarely intend to micromanage everything. (Genetic drift will happen in the parts that aren't.) And even cloning gets mutations. And if any other species has survived, then they should be affected by evolution, too.

But writers tend to ignore any possible evolution unless it's directly related to the plot. It may be on purpose, to save the trouble of imagining new species; World Building is a major distraction from writing, after all. And it's commonly believed that humans as we know them are more relatable than barely recognizable humanoid beasts who don't even resemble any other known species. (The ones that do resemble known species generally have undergone an Anthropomorphic Shift, which generally did not happen naturally...) A nonhuman human might as well be an alien...

Or maybe the writers didn't do their homework. Even if the fact that there will be genetic changes is possible to research, the nature of the changes would be a good deal harder.

See also Medieval Stasis.

Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 
  • Now and Then, Here and There is set 5 billion years in the future and humans haven't changed at all. Now, it's possible the human population was brought to the future by the 'bound' system, but that's never implied in the series.

    Comic Books 

    Literature 
  • Averted in The Underland Chronicles in that the underlander humans' eyes turned purple and their hair turned a very light blond. Although how living under ground could cause a change in melanin levels that quickly could be an example of artistic license.
  • Discussed in Isaac Asimov's The End of Eternity. Twissell, from beyond the 30,000th century, is virtually undistinguishable from a modern human (to make no mention of Nöys, who's from beyond the 100,000th century and still there's no way to tell). Twissell is convinced that this stagnation is due to some machination from beings in the future, but it's revealed that Eternity itself has deprived mankind of any evolutionary drive.
  • In Robert E. Howard's "The Hyborian Age", the Back Story of Conan the Barbarian, he inverts this, regarding cultural evolution as fixed, the failure of which, even in a short period of time, needs explaination.
    To the south of them the Picts remain savages, apparently defying the laws of Nature by neither progressing nor retrogressing.
    • But he seems to think that evolution is a one lane road that life can go both ways, but never adapting into new branches. In his world humans repeatedly regress back into apes, and then evolve to humanity again. Conan's ancestors were Atlanteans who became apes who became people, for example.
  • In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, it is mentioned that the Vogons stopped evolving shortly after they stopped being an aquatic species. The planet Vogsphere has created many other life forms far more appealing than the Vogons, which they inevitably destroy for their own amusement.
    • To lampshade it, the book even states that evolution threw up it's metaphorical hands in horror at the sight of the Vogons in daylight, refused to let them evolve again, and produced the other, amazingly beautiful creatures of Vogsphere in compensation for the Vogons.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In the BBC series Jekyll, the antagonists justify their attempts to kidnap Tom Jackman and experiment on his other personality on the basis that humanity is doomed to Evolutionary Stasis without Hyde's unique genetics.
  • Doctor Who:
    • In "New Earth" and "Gridlock", taking place 5 billion years in the future, pure humans are extinct, but the descendent species look identical.
    • In "Utopia", taking place trillions of years in the future, humans still look identical. At some point in between they spent time as clouds and data, but they apparently keep returning to human form.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Warhammer 40K: The major genetic evolution in humanity has been the emergence of psykers, and even then they're around one in a million. Somewhat enforced, however, in that FTL travel is far from easy: the populations of planets become known for very particular traits (every Catachan looks like Rambo and the Predator squad) and there is little opportunity for interbreeding. The other major modification, which involves taking the cloned genes of a long-dead superhuman warrior and injecting them into a human until they're seven feet tall and bulletproof also makes them sterile.

    Video Games 
  • Played straight in Chrono Trigger. Humans haven't changed one iota in 65 million years aside from the development of magic, and there's a number of other species that haven't changed at all either except for color. Justified when you fight the final boss - turns out Lavos has personally controlled humanity's evolution since its crash landing in 65 Million BC. Apparently the original form of man serves it best for its meal.
  • Mass Effect: Played straight and justified with the vorcha, as their DNA has been unchanged for millions of years. This is due to their ability to adapt rapidly to any environment as individuals which removes their need to evolve as a species.

Evolutionary LevelsSpeculative Fiction TropesExotic Equipment
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Evolutionary LevelsArtistic License – BiologyGenetic Engineering Is the New Nuke

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